Instructables
Picture of How to fix a broken monitor
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So I came home one day to find my old LCD monitor would turn on for a couple seconds and black out. If this sounds familiar, try shining a light at the monitor. If you can see faint outlines of what the screen is supposed to be showing, congrats your backlight is probably broken. Here's what you need to fix it:

Broken LCD monitor
Soldering iron
extra capacitors
a screwdriver

BTW: a lot of the times popped capacitors will effect the monitor in different ways. However, if your monitor stopped working in a natural manner (ie. not you punching it in rage) then more often than not it is because the capacitors are broken. Therefore, this tutorial will still work=D

BTWW: dont open CRT monitors unless you know what you're doing...but then you could probably skip reading the rest of this tutorial; they contain much larger capacitors and a new monitor is worth it. trust me.
 
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Step 1: Opening your monitor

Picture of Opening your monitor
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First step is pretty simple: attack the case with a screwdriver. Since different monitors open in different ways, I can't say much about your's. If you really are stuck trying to pry that case off, before you decide to break out the hammer, try a quick youtube/google search of your particular brand. Tip though, take pictures of all your screws like the pic attached. It'll save you much agony and humpty dumtying later on when putting it all back together again;D

There are a couple wires you may have to unplug throughout the process, and again, picture help a lot especially if you have adhd or like doing a million things at the same time.

IMPORTANT: As you reach the motherboards of the monitor be very careful where you touch. Inside there are often large capacitors that can potentially give you unpleasant shocks. To make sure they are discharged properly, use a screwdriver with a rubber handle and connect the two leads of the capacitor. Chances are it won't do anything, but safety is first as always.
Wo0kiE10 months ago
Where was this instructable a couple of years ago when I had to replace the caps on the power board of a projection TV?!? LOL

Handy piece of info but I have to include a small piece of advice:
Even if the caps have a swollen end, they may still be good. The best way to know for sure is to either have a capacitance tester or a multimeter that has a setting for testing caps.
Good piece of info though, thanks for posting.
lukish (author)  Wo0kiE9 months ago
Sorry for the late reply. I'm going to say you're welcome on behalf of my cousin (he monitors this account even less than I do :/ (He's 'luk' and I'm 'ish') Thanks for the feedback, btw. :D
lukish (author)  lukish9 months ago
(no pun intended)
AndyGadget1 year ago
 
Not just monitors - It's worth checking the capacitors on a computer motherboard as well. Signs of capacitor failure are random reboots or freezes, or hanging at early bootup. These will get more and more common as the cap breaks down more.

My company used a certain computer from a very well known brand and over half the ones in service have had to have the capacitors replaced - 10 per board - In the 5 years since we bought them.  I really should have sub-contracted my services to the company rather than just changing them as it saved the company a lot of money.
(*Lenovo A55 if anyone's interested #;¬)
i have 2 pc-s one is 10 years old and second 5 years and i didnt have any problems with capacitors :D
You may not, but plenty have.
There have been two bad outbreaks of 'capacitor plague' that I know of. (Large batch of sub-standard electrolytics being shipped and included in all manner of equipment.) Anyone who's been in electronics for any amount of time will have their own stories to tell about this.
I didn't have on the motherboard but I had one on the monitor and 2 times in the old CRT TV (i wake up one morning, turn on the TV and boom the whole room was full of smoke)