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How to get into your dream school (Ivy league, state, or other)

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I got through my four years of high school with considerable stress, confusion and anxiety. Yes, I did work my butt off, but I did get into my dream school. Here is a four year game plan for those who know what school they want to shoot for.
 
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Step 1: Research!!!

Picture of Research!!!
Where do you want to go? Harvard? University of Florida? Ohio Community college?
Here is some honest advice: ONLY WORK AS HARD AS YOU HAVE TO!!!! Many state schools are great and practical choices for state residents: they are inexpensive, local and a great way to find what you want to do for a living without spending much cash. If you do not have the means to go to school out of state, don't worry about it. Just don't work super hard to get into a school that you can't afford and then end up going to a state school and resenting others who didn't do as much work as you.
Go to prospective school's website and

1. Find out what classes they expect you to take (standard, honors, AP)
2. Find out what standardized test scores they expect (SAT, SAT II and ACT)
3. Find out what they value- Are they focused on sustainable living for the near future and a cleaner America? Or do they specialize in bringing finer arts to life? This will help you shape your high school schedule as well as extracurriculars, and also tell you what to emphasize in the admissions process.

NOTE: If you end up taking more challenging classes then you need to, try not to worry about it. Education will come back and benefit you even if the result is not immediately apparent.
Kantkaw2 years ago
What a useful information!! thanks a lot! :)
In England our universities are so different from the USA. You guys call them colleges, but for us, you can go to either college, or sixth form from the ages of 16-18 (i think that's junior and senior year for you guys) or you can stop your education at 16, however education is still free up until 18, unless you go to a private school. Then at 18 you go to a university for generally three or four years, sometimes more, dependent on courses etc. You an then do a masters degree, pHD, and other extra degrees.
This was very insightful for american college applicants, and if someone could do one for UK sixth form and Uni, I'd definitely read it :)
Thanks :D
Would this work for getting you into foreign colleges?
Whales3 years ago
Another tip to add in, Atleast in my state(Tennessee) it is thousands of dollars less to go to an in-state college. Some of the ones I"m looking at frop about 10-15 or even 20 thousand dollars! So everyone should definitely look into that

Also, I got a Magazine/book from US News on the "Best Colleges" It is a MAJOR help. It lists every accredited university/college in the country and plenty of info on each.
Whales3 years ago
I'm in my high school's band, and i love it to death, it's only bonus that I'll probably get a scholarship from it.
GO MIT !!!! w00t
granonan4 years ago
YOUR PICTURE ON THE TOP IS DARTMOUTH WOOOOOOT :))))))))
Good work.

Ivy leagues were always and will always be the top tier for schools; and so remember, the variables included in acceptance are not really known. Just try to do everything well, and excel in them. And iremember, there's always grad school. (looks even better than a undergrad at xyz school!)

I went to college about 10 years ago, before even online apps were popular. Now [http://http:/www.classesonlineusa.com Online Classes] are more popular, so you can catch up with classes and get recommendations from top schools too.

Anyways, just things to think about.
kirnex5 years ago
This is really good advice...pretty spot on, actually. A couple of notes to hopefuls:

We have three kids currently in college (U of Richmond, UVA, and Wake Forest), and one who went to Davidson and will be starting law school next fall. Going through the process is tedious at best, and it doesn't get easier (as the competition just seems to get worse).

My younger daughter, who is now a freshman at UVA, also applied to and was accepted into William & Mary, Emory (for their very competitive pre-med program), Vanderbilt, U of Richmond's Honors Law program, and Davidson. For those who are worried about not being "privileged" (as many kids at the better schools seem to be), there is hope! She went to a public school and did not participate in any sports. She made excellent grades, however, and she DID spend a lot of time doing extracurricular activities (excelling in two, notably). She did extremely well on the SAT in the verbal and written portions (which she personally attributes to taking four+ years of Latin), and pretty well on the math (not her forte).

Some keys for her seemed to be the following:

1) She took several SAT IIs, and of course had numerous APs under her belt.
2) She stood out by adding some humor to her essays and writing about rather progressive-minded topics.
3) Finding her school's guidance department woefully inadequate, we hired a one-time college advisor to look over her applications and help her tweak them.
4) She graduated tenth out of a class of 500.
5) She applied to several schools. This is essential. According to the college advisor and several Deans of Admissions we've spoken to, gone are the days of applying to two or three schools and expecting to get into them all. Apparently, the first-tier schools are now seeing an increase in applications ten-fold from a decade ago, and the average student applying has also applied to 8-10 other schools. This makes it very difficult because you are competing now with a much larger pool of applicants.

Also, if you get waitlisted at one school, don't fret. My daughter was initially waitlisted at William & Mary and took it very personally, until she was accepted to UVA, Emory, and Vanderbilt! You have to consider what the ratio of women to men is, the typical student applicant body, etc. W&M has a higher ratio of women to men, and of in-state female applicants, in particular. That worked against my daughter, we suspect. Apparently, they were trying to balance their freshman class, because none of her female friends (all in the top ten of their class) got into W&M at first, either--but a male friend did--AND was offered a $3000 scholarship. He also scored an 800 on his math SAT. But, it shows you there is never a "perfect equation" for getting into any school. It just depends on the needs of that year's class.

However, following all this advice will surely help you compete with all those other high-achievers, so kudos for offering the info!
Dorkfish925 years ago
Wow, nice work! I'm in my Junior year of high school right now and plan on going to University of Central Florida (15 minutes away). Thanks for all the tips! For others reading this, noxvox is correct about the sports thing. I wrestled varsity freshman and sophomore year; however, keeping up with sports and academics is tough. School is so much easier now without sports. Also, now I was able to switch out of 1st period wrestling into AP Computer Science. =-)
NO! Go far away from home. Don't fall into the trap of living at home. FInd yourself, eat ramen noodles like everyone else, complain of the dining hall food. Just push yourself beyond your comfort zone.
noxvox (author)  Calorie5 years ago
Here's the thing. Florida has a scholarship program called "Bright Futures," which can pay for 75-100% of tuition to a state school for students who meet the requirements. Financially, this is an amazing option for students who do not have the resources to go out of state or have not decided what they want to do yet. You do not want to go to a private school with a $30,000 a year price tag in order to "find yourself" for a couple of years and not end up with a degree. I agree that going to school away from home is the ideal option. The University of Florida is a great state school and is still covered by "Bright Futures." Thank you for the insight about student loans. I neglected to cover paying for college once you got in!
Scurge noxvox5 years ago
I applied to FAFSA and got a full ride grant. The university also gave me a SMART grant (its an acronym, Science math and something or other) so I actually got payed $1700 to go to school this semester! The 3.79 GPA and student activities helped, and I'm 27 and don't have to put my parents income on my grant applications like most students. Plus I showed a loss on my taxes for last year so that helped. LOL according to the IRS, I'm sub-poverty. I have been broke as crap, for real though. : /
Calorie noxvox5 years ago
I am aware of Bright Futures. I am from Florida, and UF is a good school. I went to USF for my degrees, then to Europe for others. That said, there is a reason for alumni networks. They are like clubs. Graduate of the military academies wear their rings for life. Part of it is for pride. The other part is for identification of each other. Americans love name brands. They are impressed when people have expensive things, irrespective of their functionality. I could tell you that I went to the University of York in England. That would draw a blank. However, I could then tell you I had the option of Oxford but York Uni had a better program for my career. Would you know that? Most likely not (it was for social work.) As an American, would you really care? Again, most likely not. Human Resource drones will see the words "Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, etc..." and their eyes will bulge out. Oh, as far as cost, Harvard has a great deal of grants available to its students. This is true for most of the Ivies. I'm not promoting elitism, but for career reasons name recognition is a god send. Also, if you are talented, it is good to be around others like yourself. You'll feel more at home and be more likely to push yourself harder. Best O' Luck!
Not like all schools don't have their problems, but avoid UCF if you can unless you're going into one of their specialty programs (engineering, education, business, or forensic science). Other schools have better education, better classes, and aren't called U CANT FINISH. Not to mention better advisers, people who care, etc. Take it from a 5th year UCF student, this is not where you want to be if it can be helped. If you insist on this option, consider going to community college for 2 years, it really helps speed up graduation (only 4 years this way), gives you better classes, and costs a whole lot less. Plus you're more likely to get into the FL 4 year school of your choice. Bright Futures isn't all it's cracked up to be either. It doesn't include the extra boat-load of fees they added on this year and most of the people I know lost it because of one bad semester. Needless to say, I'm not a fan of the FL education system or their budget cuts. And by the way: all of my friends who lived at home when they started college moved out. Why? You experience new freedom in college and your parents don't give you that same freedom. I don't mean to sound so negative, but UCF isn't so hot. I love college and the people I've met here, but the education isn't as nice as if I had gone elsewhere. UCF doesn't have my program (decided at the end of my junior year), isn't helping me with classes that could be useful in my future, and is thus spoiling my chances of good grad schools. Pooey! As much as it sucks, I say look out of state. Some schools (Olin, in Ohio, for example) pay tuition and books for engineers, or so I've heard. Some NY schools cost just as much as FL in-state tuition, depending on the program. If you do your research right, you may find a better opportunity elsewhere.
Yea, I do realize that Bright Futures isn't AMAZING; however, it is still A LOT of money that I would have to spend otherwise. My sister has it and she wouldn't be able to afford college without it. Anyways, I plan on doing an engineering program. I'll probably stay home my first 2 years until I have some money.
I'm in my Junior year of high school right now and plan on going to University of Central Florida (15 minutes away)

Cool! That's not too far from where I am! (about 1-1/2hrs)

I live about 10 minutes from FIT, though. I might end up going to a state college; I think I want to go to Florida State...
noxvox (author)  Dorkfish925 years ago
5% Percentage of high school athletes who go on to compete in college SOURCES: Mass. Interscholastic Athletic Association; NCAA I found this at boston.com. Thanks for the comments!
Gosh, I wish I was as smart as you, noxvox :P
I would also recommend that you do something that you're passionate about and let that show through in your application as well. Some admission people want to see your personality beyond a list of college-aimed accomplishments.
V-Man7375 years ago
Hehe... An Instructable for dealing with poison ivy is in the "related" column on the right... Also great Instructable! Five points for Gryffindor!
mmcnama45 years ago
I am no English major, but I do find it funny that butt is spelled wrong...
noxvox (author)  mmcnama45 years ago
Ha! I corrected the error, rendering your comment inaccurate! (thanks for reading closely though)
mmcnama4 noxvox5 years ago
Honest mistake...
Labot20015 years ago
Awesome job! I don't hand out 5 stars often, but you've earned it!

If I can add a bit of advice, though, it's this: don't switch schools during high school. I started at a new high school in a new state freshman year, and was wayyy ahead. I was bored in class and decided to switch to another school that offered more advanced courses in the middle of my freshman year. After that year was over, my family and I decided to move to Florida, where I'll be starting 10th grade in my third high school.

I know it's not always completely avoidable, but trust me, if you can avoid it, then do avoid it. You'll save yourself A BUNCH of headaches, especially if your credits get screwed up, as mine did...



Also, if you go to a private school and your school doesn't offer the clubs/sports/activities that you're interested in (*cough*marchingband*cough*) then in most cases, the public school that your residency is zoned for will allow you to participate in theirs. I'll be in marching band at the local public high school next year (I got here in mid-August... marching season starts late June).
PKM5 years ago
This seems pretty thorough... if there isn't one already you have inspired me to do a similar guide for the UKinese (general guidance is sound but our schools system is so different all the specifics in this Instructable don't really apply). Stars for you, sir.
noxvox (author)  PKM5 years ago
That's great! Yeah, I can only provide insight about American public schools with AP classes, which is a pretty narrow topic. The more guides about education that we can produce, the better off we'll be. For example, if anybody wants to write about IB schools more in depth, or ones with block schedules (or more for other countries), be my guest. Thanks PKM for covering the UK! To answer mironman above, I am of the female persuasion.
Calorie5 years ago
I've gone to both public and Ivy league schools and I can say that there aren't a great deal of differences. You get what you put into it. The only thing that really matters is the name on the diploma. Harvard is Harvard and no one will be the wiser that you skimmed by or were at the top of your class. They'll see the degree and think your brilliant. Public Schools are great in my opinion. Work hard and you can gain a reputation that will follow you far. On the other hand, you'll have to deal with the academic deadwood. It's a trade off. Avoid PRIVATE LOANS. Stafford loans are the way to go. Unsecured private loans are from the Bank of Hades. I've also studied as a full student in Europe. In the UK they found it abhorrent that one would share a room. Instead you have a small hall with a communal kitchen. The criteria for schools in the UK is different. I often felt it was how they felt about you as a person, not so much as a number. The interviews were fun and generally enjoyable. You know what you know and that was that. Oxford Uni has the weirdest though. And if you came from a state school and worked hard and researched with a professor who was prominent in their field...you are doing yourself a huge favor. It's like a big club where everyone knows everyone else.
This is a good guide, but I really think the true deciding factor is whether or not you're sure about what you want to do. I had no idea when I left high school, and therefore made a stupid school choice based solely on things that were external to my education. (Significant other, wanting to move to a big city, live on my own, etc.) Don't let someone like a friend, parent or significant other choose for you. You need to be worrying about yourself and your education. I didn't realize this, and now I'm stuck at a school I don't care for. I got lucky and found something I wanted to do and cared about, but it took a lot of wading through classes I hated and didn't need. I'm graduating two years late, actually. :P To summarize: go in with a plan and be selfish! :D
I would counter and say that having a vague idea is a great way to go. Leave yourself open to new vistas. Study abroad for at least a semester. Go to different classes. You'll have general education credits you must take, and it will expose you to all sides of education. You may find what you want. I do agree that you should NEVER follow a partner to a new school. It's over, it's not going to work, a long distance relationship will only end up in protracted misery. FIN. Also, keep your parents away from you. Call home and remind them how lonely and poor you are, but that's about it. Don't let them come to campus with you. Part of the fun is stumbling around trying to find the registrar's office or the ID issuing room. You'll meet new people in your Zelda like quest to find the dining hall early on. People quickly make friends and then it becomes a bit harder. Mom and Dad get the first weekend to haul you up there, buy you dorm supplies and that's that. Speaking of dorms, live in them for the first year. After that it's time to go! Try to get the type where you have a room by yourself. The last thing you want is a roommate you farts all the time during sleep (ugh...) Bonne Chance!
mironman5 years ago
Are you a guy or a girl?
Pretty useful information, I'm in my sophomore year, and unfortunately, I can't change up into AP classes this late in the year (2 weeks in, god forbid. . .), although my stanines are all 9's. I plan on taking 4 next year, in my core classes. I think you may be wrong regarding the music bits though. I plan on attending a conservatory in Boston on a partial scholarship (of course, it is only a plan), although it's rather difficult. Being in a jazz ensemble, as opposed to marching band or such, will help immensely, if I'm not mistaken.
I forwarded this to a couple of people who are in high school that I know are stressing out about college entrance. There may be better guides out there somewhere for this sort of thing, but your Instructable is easy reading and cuts to the chase. Well done.
Kiteman5 years ago
Wow, very comprehensive, and (to a non-Yank) useful-sounding advice. Rated.
noxvox (author)  Kiteman5 years ago
Thanks for rating/featuring this! I appreciate the comments, as this is my first Instructable.
Kiteman noxvox5 years ago
You're welcome - you've set yourself a high bar to match, though.
joshf5 years ago
My quick two cents: there's really no "way" to get into any school. It's all a crapshoot really, and the best advice anyone can give you is probably to try to show why you are interesting/make your application stand out in some way. Yes, have fun in high school--enjoy it. But doing the bare minimum to get by is not the best way to go about it. Take classes you like, and spend time talking to your teachers: you might find that some of them will give you some great advice and ideas.
saites20015 years ago
Also: If you want to do ROTC, FOR THE LOVE OF GOD don't drink/do drugs/get arrested. Some branches don't care so much, but some (esp. Air Force) won't let you in at all. I took all (3) of the AP courses my high school offered. Dual Enrollment (taking a class at a local college instead of a high school course) can also be great. For me, it allowed me to free up my schedule (I only had class one or two days a week) and take more specialized classes that my school didn't offer. As a bonus, I found the classes to be quite easy, and they all transferred to my college.
noxvox (author)  saites20015 years ago
I think it's great when we get a lot perspectives in the comments. There are so many ways to get through high school, and I only went through it once. Thank you for contributing and adding useful info! :)
lawizeg5 years ago
Sweet. I'm gonna follow this when i get into high school. Rated!
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