Step 4: Giving them the bends.

Next step is to give the pieces of underwire the characteristic bends. These bends are very important to the jiggling method mentioned before. What you need to do here, is lay the pieces so they are together as best you can and then clamp them with vice grips about an inch from one end. Put a bend in them, but don't try to make it too sharp. A rounded bend is okay. Also, this bend doesn't need to be 90 degrees. A bend of 60 or 70 degrees is appropriate here.  The most important part of the bend is to make sure the pieces are held tightly together. This will make them sit with each other.  

Next, grab the pair about an inch and a half from the bend you just put in the picks. It's time for the twist. Grab the fore- end with another pair of pliers and give it a 90 degree twist. *Note* The twist you put in should rotate the interior of the curve in the same direction as the downward bend you put in a moment ago. Check the photo if this is confusing.

Now, study the pictures carefully, yours need to look like mine. Study them and make that happen.
<p>Finally made it and it looks like crap compared to yours. But I got in my door within 10 seconds on the first shot. Great instructable!</p>
<p>Thanks for the compliment! Function is always over form in my opinion. As long as they work, the beauty is in the success! </p>
<p>Man I'm dying to make thus but my print out for it isnt printing out big enough or to big too. how do itt print it out correctly? using gimp for the dpi i think it's called. it's close for sure just want it to be prefect. maybe ill go with the smaller and eyeball it.</p>
<p>Thats the best part about rakes like this, it doesn't have to be perfect, often variations in the way they are made end up advantageous for different sizes of locks! So many keyways and pin combinations make for a wide range of usable sized tools. Make one set and if they turn out too large for whatever lock you are fiddling with, make another set slightly smaller. You will use the larger one on some old Schlage cylinder some day. </p>
sweet. how about you make me a pair instead lol. will give this a shot
Underwire........ you are putting WAY to much thought into this AND at the wrong times!
Ha! Oh how I wish it was as simple as my mind wandering. I have an issue throwing stuff away, and apparently bras are not made to last. So, my thriftiness and bras disposability made it only natural that I would have to find a use for the metal in them.
That must have taken a steady hand. Props for that. It's crazy what you can make lock picks out of. I went on a google spree after seeing this and I found instructions to make temporary lockpicks out of paperclips.&nbsp;<a href="http://openalockeddoor.com/locked-out-of-house/" rel="nofollow">http://openalockeddoor.com/locked-out-of-house/</a>
Love field-expedient tools! :D
Thats nice...
King, If you have a local bike shop or REI they can order you packs of flat spokes if you ask. I work at REI and know they will. I should also mention they are made of some pretty solid steel. <br>I need to build a deadbolt rig and practice more with my set. So far I've only been successful at my house.
I will have to check them out. I'm always looking for new supplies of steel to make more picks. Thanks!
Some parts from laser printer cartridges may also work. :)
Great instructable! I just made a set from a pair of blade style bike spokes and thy work pretty great!
Excellent! I'm glad they work, I have never tried the flat bike spokes. Maybe in the near future I can find and repurpose some.
That set looks to have come out nicely! The curve on the pick shaft is a bit odd, but I must admit curiosity as to how that affects utility... does it help, impede, or is it neutral in its effect on use? Personally, I'd think it might detract from the function, but that is only speculation based on how the normal bogota interacts with the pins. It may very well prove to be beneficial. I think I may have to make a set with a curve on it like that to find out how they work for me. <br> <br>Also, DIY bogotas always make me think of the BIGGOTA I made for MBI over at Keypicking as part of a novelty pick set I did for him (The lightning bolt is pretty cool too.) There is a pic of it in the following thread over there: http://keypicking.com/viewtopic.php?f=39&amp;t=5410
LMBO, where have I seen a comment similar to this?
Similar yes, identical, no... But regardless, nice work. Nice 'ible too!
Thanks a ton!
Document the process of making it that is.
Not this time. I will however. My better half has a call out to all the girls she knows to save me the underwires. Im sure they'll find it creepy. I will say, After playing around with the reach-diamond, I may like it even more than the bogotas.
You didn't happen to document the other pick you made from the rest of the underwire did you?
The bragotas are excellent, I have 3 pairs of them. I carry a pair every day in a duct tape pouch that is inside the belt case for my leatherman. I have used them on many occasions to pop an old master lock or some knockoff that a friend or family member has lost the key for. Also, they work on the crappy wafer lock in my filing cabinet at work. I have gotten to my precious drawer full of tea on many occasions using these, when I forget the key. I have yet to try them on anything heavy-security but they are wonderful on every lock I own. The curvature actually comes up aces, if you see the design by Raimundo, he has a bend right before the twist in the shaft of the pick, the curvature of the underwire does this for you and makes it superlatively comfortable. The curve is so slight though overall that I have noticed no difference at the business end of the pick between these and ones that I have made of sweeper bristle and wiper blade.
This is amazing!
You are too kind. :) I owe you one!
This is awesome! What a cool upcycle for bra underwire.
Thanks for the feedback!

About This Instructable


159 favorites


More by hailtothkngbby: How to make a Bogota Rake from bra underwire, or Bragota;  a how-to. How to make your own diaphragm turkey call The Litter Kit
Add instructable to: