Instructables
Picture of How to make a Color-changing LED flower headband
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This is a similar idea to my glowing flower headband (which can be found here:http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-a-glowing-flower-headband/ ) but this one requires more soldering and gives more freedom.

Step 1: Materiels

Picture of Materiels
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For this project, you will need:

-one fake flower (or more, you can use a bunch if you want.  Bigger and fluffier ones are easier to work with)
-color changing LED (or any color)
-one small switch
-one battery holder that will hold 2 AAA batteries
-2 AAA batteries
-blank headband
-ribbon
-feathers, or anything else you want to use to decorate
-hot glue and glue gun
-soldering iron and solder
-electrical tape

Step 2: Put the LED in the flower

Picture of Put the LED in the flower
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I've made a few of these and after some experimentation, this is the best way to get the LED inside the flower.  Disassemble your flower by taking out the plastic center peg that the petals are stacked on.  You might have to carefully separate some of them if they are glued together.
Check your LED to make sure it works first.  Wrap some electrical tape around one of the leads and then around both of them, but don't wrap too tight or put pressure on them.  This is the part that will now act as the enter peg of the flower.  Insert the wrapped leads through the top petals and continue putting the flower back together, hot gluing as you go.  Keep the layers of petals in the same order.  When you are done, your flower should look the same as it did before, but with an LED in the center.

Step 3: Solder the circuit

Picture of Solder the circuit
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The short lead of your LED should be ground.  Solder it to the ground of the battery pack with a short length of wire about 5 inches long.  The long lead is positive.  Solder that to a switch lead and the positive of the battery pack to the switch.  Try the switch.  Your circuit should work.  Wrap all connections in electrical tape.  You might need to use a resistor in your circuit depending on what type of LED you have.
 
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Oh this would make a great present! You should post a picture when it's done!
Its really an interesting 1
i want 2 do this and
want 2 give surprise 2 my firends
i hav a small doubt
dnt u think that the bateries used makes the band heavy
do u have any alternative for this????
The batteries are not unbearably heavy, although you can feel them on your head. You could definitely use a 3 volt coin battery or two 1.5 volt watch batteries, both of which are much smaller, easier to hide and lighter weight. I just happened to have AAA batteries and the holder for them so I used those.
Basically, you just need to provide the right voltage to your LED and mine needed 3 volts, so any type of battery that can accomplish that will work.
If you make this please post pictures! I love that people are interested in it!
OK THANKU FOR THE INFORMATION
scoochmaroo4 years ago
Yes, I may need to make one of these for my wedding. . .
That would be awesome! Post a picture if you end up making one! I'd love to see other variations!
ChrysN4 years ago
Pretty, I like the way you hid the battery with the ribbon!
thanks! It was a challenge to figure out how I was going to hide it, but it turned out really well and you can't even see the battery pack on the finished headband :)