Introduction: How to Make a Fairly Simple Wood Framed Mirror With Shelf

Picture of How to Make a Fairly Simple Wood Framed Mirror With Shelf

Using recycled materials,
This is how I make mirrors from a single board, I normally use Oak but for this I'm using Pine as it is easier to work, with basic tools.

Step 1: Tools

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Saw
Knife
File
Screwdriver
Drill
Pencil
Scroll saw/Fret saw
Screws
Hanging hook
Router

Step 2: Materials

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You will need a piece of wooden board - I won't give measurements for this as you can make it any size you wish, except to say...
The thickness should be minimum 25mm to allow for recessing the glass (mirror).
And some mirror, 3-4mm thick

Step 3:

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Mark out the shape of your design but don't make it too narrow around the sides, and allow space at the top on the back for a hook or hanger, and enough space at the bottom for the shelf.  If possible cut the shelf from the same piece.
I have added some shape to make it look more interesting.

Step 4:

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Now cut out the pieces - If you have used curves you will need to use a band saw, scroll saw or fret saw.

Step 5:

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To cut out the middle you will need a scroll saw or fret saw, start by drilling a hole at one corner and start your cut here.

Step 6:

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Now Add shape and detail to the frame, and remove or curve the edges using a knife, file or as I used here - a drawknife.

Step 7:

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Decide on the design and cut out the shelf and also shape and detail this - make the width narrower than the frame by about 20mm overall.

Step 8:

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Take a piece of mirror and cut it 6 - 8mm bigger all round than the aperture you have cut out, don't make it too long as you will need room top and bottom for the shelf screws and a hanging loop.
Lay the frame face down and the mirror face down on top of it, make sure the mirror is evenly overlapping the aperture and draw around the mirror, mark the back of the mirror and the frame so you know which way the glass fits.

Step 9:

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Use a router if possible or a multitool, otherwise a chisel and cut inside the lines to a depth equal to the thickness of the mirror.  Clean up the edges and corners using a chisel or sharp knife.

Step 10:

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Place the shelf where you want it and draw around it lightly, then mark a center line between the sides where the screw holes will go about 25mm in from each end, then drill these at 4mm

Step 11:

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Give the whole thing a good sanding, and then you can fit the shelf with two screws from the back through the pre-drilled countersunk holes and then fit a hanging loop.

Step 12:

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Give it one or two coats using the finish you prefer - varnish, wax oil etc - I used Danish oil here, and when dry glue the mirror into place - I use silicone for this as its flexible and makes it easier to replace the mirror in the event of an accident.
You may want to glue felt on the back or some other material, this improves the overall appearance and protects the mirror coating.

Comments

MaryT8M (author)2012-01-17

OMG how COOL,,,,,,,,,,I take it you have a shop and sell them. I really LOVE wood.....I like to look at all the wood grain, and the knots etc. My friend's husband makes bowls on a lathe (I think).....It's fun watching how the natural colors come out on the wood. He made a small bowl for me from Mulberry wood and it was yellow!

MatthewEnderle (author)MaryT8M2012-01-19

hey if you love wood and the natural grain look at my grand parent's intarsia projects at thier etsy page http://www.etsy.com/shop/jdintarsia

Also if you were interested in Computers too I'd advise you too look at my instructable on my wooden Computer https://www.instructables.com/id/iDeciduous-The-Wooded-Computer-Case/

Nice work, on both counts... but as for computers - Instructables is as close as my beloved woodwork is allowed to get to them :)

Thank you, I have a friend who has a shop and he buys a lot, I also have a craft stall but haven't done that for a while. Wood is my favourite material, metal second. Cherry is nice, and Laburnam (although poisonous) looks good for bowls, I carve mine by hand as I don't have space for a lathe at the moment, I've never had the pleasure of Mulberry, but I have a nice piece of Yew which needs carving soon.

MaryT8M (author)2012-01-16

I REALLY like this! I'll show it to my DH and hope he takes the "hint"

Thanks, These look really nice in Oak, here are a few without shelves -

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