Instructables
Picture of How to make a tool set
Life without tools is barbaric. But even simple tools can be expensive in rural parts of developing countries. Import duties bump the costs up higher than they are in the States or elsewhere, and sometimes only low-quality brands are available anyway.

So, to hold off future barbarians, we'd like to show how to build a simple tool set on a very low budget.

Larry Bentley, the man who figured out how to make these tools, said a wise thing: "Without tools, kids don't take stuff apart, and without taking stuff apart, you don't learn how things work."

These tools, Bentley says, could be in the hands of the next William Kamkambwa,who made a working wind power generator from backyard scraps in a village in Malawi.

Here's Larry's quick guide to DIY tools.

The tools in this guide:
  • Saw
  • Pliers
  • Wooden vice
  • Wood drill bit / star drill bit
  • Chisel
  • Strap hinge vice
 
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Step 1: How to bend rebar

Picture of How to bend rebar
The first step in making the saw and drill is to bend rebar. Try sliding a pipe around one end to use a hickey bar and a  pipe "T" with a pipe attached to the bottom of the "T" around the other end. That way, you can make tighter bends, and you can even make the brace and bit without a vise.

Step 2: Saw: step one

Picture of Saw: step one
RebarSawHandle.JPG
As you'd expect, Bentley shops for souvenirs in hardware stores. So, he was souvenir hunting in a hardware store in the cruise ship port city Costa Maya, Mexico when he saw a hacksaw made from bent rebar.

That inspired this rebar saw.

Start by bending the saw and the handle into the shape shown. You can use the pipe bending technique shown in Step One.
park4711 months ago
Thanks...:D
faacuunndoo2 years ago
Very good instructable. I'll try to make some of those tools.
About pushing vs pulling blades-
This is one of those false arguments. There is only one way that a flimsy toothed blade like a hacksaw blade can function, and that's being pulled. It's the very reason that you use the blade 'pulling' with no saw frame. The only difference is whether it's pulled by the front or back of the saw. Now, would you rather pull on a blade from a sturdy attachment point close to the handle (control), or an attachment point out on the end of an at least somewhat bendy tube or rod? Pulling toward oneself is the stronger, more precise option. Especially when the saw frame is less than ideal (As soon as the frame bows even slightly one is threading an arced blade through the cut).
It's also less likely that one will bear down ones weight through the saw when cutting by pulling, and each tooth of the blade can slice (as it was designed to), instead of digging into the target material and 'catching'.
flamesami2 years ago
Very good instructable, but I have to point this out - there are many types of steel, all of them different. If you sort Iron/steel by carbon content, it would be something like this:
Iron - almost no carbon
"mild" steel - very little carbon, difficult to harden
"medium" steel - more carbon, still difficult to harden
"high carbon" steel - lots of carbon (I think up to 1%) hardens easily (springs, files saws are usually good sources for this)
cast iron - so much carbon it's brittle

all of these forge differently, and harden differently. the lower the carbon content, the harder they are to harden and so need a faster quench - oil is slowest, then (I think)water, brine and "super quench" which is water, salt and detergent (Google it for correct proportions)
If you know what the steel is, you know more about how it might behave - O2needs an oil quench, for example
rebar is usually a mishmash of steel, usually mild to medium, but some is medium to high carbon

yes, I'm a bit of a steel geek :)
(also, a hammer can be made with a thick rod of steel and a "hot chisel" or punch
Good info, thanks! I'll post a note about your comment on the Blacksmithing step.
This puts visually observable phenomena to the words they used so it might be useful:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spark_testing

But now you're going to have to expand your tool set to include a high speed grinder.
Nice Instructable.
You could score the faces of the pliers with the the hacksaw to improve their grip.
Huh. Good idea.
flamesami2 years ago
Very good instructable, but I have to point this out - there are many types of steel, all of them different. If you sort Iron/steel by carbon content, it would be something like this:
Iron - almost no carbon
"mild" steel - very little carbon, difficult to harden
"medium" steel - more carbon, still difficult to harden
"high carbon" steel - lots of carbon (I think up to 1%) hardens easily (springs, files saws are usually good sources for this)
cast iron - so much carbon it's brittle

all of these forge differently, and harden differently. the lower the carbon content, the harder they are to harden and so need a faster quench - oil is slowest, then (I think)water, brine and "super quench" which is water, salt and detergent (Google it for correct proportions)
If you know what the steel is, you know more about how it might behave - O2needs an oil quench, for example
rebar is usually a mishmash of steel, usually mild to medium, but some is medium to high carbon

yes, I'm a bit of a steel geek :)
(also, a hammer can be made with a thick rod of steel and a "hot chisel" or punch
Wazzupdoc2 years ago
This great! I took a smithing course where we first had to make all the tools we needed to do smithing! What a great experience. great 'ibble.
Kinnishian2 years ago
Super cool instructable.
rimar20002 years ago
WOW, these tools are amazing!

In 1968 I was at military service and they ask me If I could do some rustic drills to make holes on hard wood. I accepted, and made three of them. The chucks were simply an additional rod, parallel to main axis, fastened using a tube, hammered. The drill bits were purchased, square stem.