Instructables

How to make pickled sausage

Picture of How to make pickled sausage
You will need:
a stove
a large pot
a small piece of grill or grating
canning jars
sausage
vinegar
spices
jalapenos(optional)
 
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Step 1: Step 1: Select type of sausage to pickle

Picture of Step 1: Select type of sausage to pickle
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I believe you could pickle any type of sausage as long as its cooked. I will show pictures of my own recipe for Smoked Jalapeno Venison Kielbasa. I get my sausage from Pete The Hunter. Pete has his own blend of venison (deer meat) and pork or beef depending on what he is making.

Step 2: Step 2: Cook the sausage

Picture of Step 2: Cook the sausage
Sausage can be purchased pre-cooked like kielbasa. I prefer this method to buying raw sausage and cooking it. It makes for a prettier finished product. If you grill sausage then pickle it you will have globs of grease floating around in the jars. Getting a smoked flavored sausage helps with the final product as well.

Step 3: Step 3: Make the brine

Picture of Step 3: Make the brine
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The brine is the liquid in which you pickle. There are numerous potential combinations to add to the brine. I like to add peppers for flavor. In the particular recipe I use jalapenos. Any pepper could be used depending on how hot you like your food. I also use apple cider vinegar. Regular vinegar can be used it's all just personal preference. Make sure you use 5% only and do not dilute. It's important that the pH stays low enough so that bacteria does not grow inside your jars. Then add whatever spices you would like to add for flavor. Bring this combination to a boil and let simmer for a few minutes.

Step 4: Step 4: Assemble ingredients

Picture of Step 4: Assemble ingredients
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I use quart size canning jars. I hand wash and run them through the dish washer to make sure they are clean. I put a little bit of the peppers in the bottom and place the sausage inside. Place more peppers and spices on top and fill with the brine up to the part of the jar that has the ring.
Cee20081 year ago
As written this recipe and method are only safe to be stored under refrigeration.
This is not a safe way to can meat to be stored on a shelf. A 10 to 15 minute boiling water bath is only safe for things like jams and jellies. All meat must be pressure canned. The fact that the jars are sealed does not make the meat safe to eat. Jars will seal when heated then allowed to cool. Botulism grows in vacuumed sealed jars.
djkurtz92 (author)  Cee20081 year ago
You are correct in saying that botulism grows in vacuum sealed cans. However, you can tell if you have botulism if the can swells, bloats, or foams when opened. The dimple on top of the lid is a pretty safe bet that nothing is going on with your can. Also, it depends on the pH of the contents of the food. My recipe is pure vinegar along with other spices and jalapeños. If I were canning say peaches that I don't want to taste like vinegar I have a greater risk of botulism. I don't keep the rings on so if there is a problem with my canning the lids will swell and likely pop open on there own as there is nothing holding them down. I believe safety to be a number one priority, so I appreciate your comment. I have not had a single suspect jar in the years I have been making this recipe, and have eaten this sausage up to one year after completion. These jars are stored on a rack in my basement and not in a refrigerator until just before I'm ready to eat it.
fzbw9br djkurtz929 months ago

I won't discuss the issue of vinegar as a sterilent, but I will say this:

There is NO WAY to tell if your product is contaminated with "Botulism"

it does NOT foam, swell, bloat.... what ever! It does NOT!

you can open a jar/can of product that appears perfect and it will kill you!

just because YOU have not died from it, using this method does not mean it is safe.

many many grammas thaw their turkeys overnight on the counter, and no one gets sick... that doesn't mean it is safe to thaw turkeys on the counter overnight.

please, do some research.

and for everyone else, HEED Cee2008's advice and STORE IN THE FRIDGE!