Instructables
After making the first version of Metal Pulse Magnetizer, I have read some constructive comments so I decided to make the second version of this device, which is more stable and safer. You will see how to make it in next steps, but first, if you want, you can read this abstract which is about the modifications of this version of magnetizer.
This Magnetizer uses a bleeding LED which empty the capacitors if they are not used. It is more stable because the circuit is built on a perfboard and fixed with two screws. It also contain 2 CAPACITORS, so the magnetizing pulse is more powerful.
I hope you will enjoy this project.
 Let's get to work.
 
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Step 1: Materials needed

Picture of Materials needed
Below you have a list with materials needed. Most of my materials are recycled. So with this project I want to show you that you can make "gold" from trash.
 - a 1N4007 diode
- a DPST switch (I get mine from an old lamp)
- a Push button switch 
- two capacitors - 220 µF and 400 V (I get mine from CRT screens)
- a nonconducting electricity case (My case is taken from an old recycled device)
- because my case didn't have panel, I've made two panels from the back of two old keyboards
- a jack from an old power supply unit
- a lamp (15 W, 220 V)
- something on you can spool your coil (I use a plastic support from soldering wire with inner diameter 20 mm [don't use something that have the inner diameter bigger than 20 mm because then your magnetizer will not work])
- a cable for your jack (I use an ordinary cable for PC supply), why I use it ? because it can be removed
- copper wire for making a coil (0.6 mm diameter for 800 turns) 
If you have made the first version of magnetizer, you can disassemble it and use the coil.
Before you start to build this device, you must check if the capacitors are empty. If they aren't empty, you must discharge them.
If you don't know how to do that, you can check it here.
->http://www.wikihow.com/Discharge-a-Capacitor
When your close the switch you have an LC circuit which will tend to oscillate which will decrease the final field. A snubber diode will kill this oscillation ( google for more info ). The caps you are using are polarized and may act as snubbers themselves. I am not sure if this is bad for them or not. A single sweep scope would show you the discharge and see if there is an oscillation or not.
bvictal1 year ago
Wouldn't the back EMF damage your electrolytic capacitors? I think you will need some sort of flyback diode here if you want your Caps to have a longer life.