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Hi everyone, I am efendisiz from Turkey/ Istanbul. This is my first instructable.
I am going to show you, how to process empty tetrapak packagings for easy storing & recycling.

Step 1: 1- Clean Your Tetrapak

- Before you start, wash the inside with water.
- Begin form the bottom, detach the glued flaps.
- Squeeze the package from the corners.
- do the same thing for the top.


Step 2: 2- Remove the Bottlecap and the Piercing Screw

- Uncap your bottle
- There is a reverse moving cutter piece in the cap mechanism, remove it by sticking in & turning your finger either clockwise (it comes outside, be carefull it has sharp edges) or counterclockwise (it falls in the package)

Step 3: 3- Remove the Cap Screw With a Knife

- Apply pressure and make the package flat.
- Remove the remaining cap screw with a knife, slowly and in a circular cutting movement.

Step 4: 4- Cut the Both Ends Off

- Use a sharp knife and a ruler.
- Cut the ends of the package
- Now you have a hollow tube.

Step 5: 5- Open Up the Tube

- Use a piece of wood as a support while cutting the tube vertically.
- Cut from the place of joint. Use a ruler for easy cutting.

Step 6: 6- the Final Products

I processed 15 tetrapaks, you can see from the photos now they consume very small space, i can store them one on top of of each other. Putting a weight on helps them to become flatter.

OK now, what can we do with these;

Tetrapaks are, waterproof & lightproof, i am going to ducktape them together and use them as a reflector but i need more. Maybe they can also be used on rooftops.

I have plans for the caps also, i think i am going to make a 3d art piece with them, but i haven't decided yet.

You can fire up your barbecue with remaining cut off pieces, or store them in an other tetrapak for later recycling.

If you have some brighter ideas please share.

I hope you enjoyed my instructable.

Can any of those components <em>actually</em> be<strong> recycled</strong>? <br /> <br /> Or are you just showing a way to break them down into individual parts so to &quot;re-use&quot; them..?<br /> <br /> <br />
<p>A tetrapak is made up from polyethylene on the outside which protects the paper layer (for strength) ,, then a polyethylene layer for adhesive.. then foil and then two more layers of polyethylene. The carton is 75% paper. I attempted to cut the tetrapak into strips and then soak them in hot water over night.. it didn't help much.. i managed to salvage about 30% of the paper before giving up. The aluminium foil (about 5% of the carton) can be collected and recycled. Polyethylene makes about about 20%.</p><p>Perhaps you could re-fashion the flattened tetrapaks into a concave reflector to condense sunlight onto photovoltaic sensors... :-/</p>
Heh yıllardır bunu nasıl yaparım diye d&uuml;ş&uuml;n&uuml;yordum sen muthişssin :)
I'm just wondering whether using the off-cut pieces for a barbecue wouldn't be a bit dangerous (health-wise)? Maybe if you use them to start the fire it would be okay, but if you were going to barbecue with it I'd be worried about fumes affecting the taste and possibly being toxic.
Exactly, it is ok to start a fire, but i prefer not to barbecue on tetrapak remains.
For a cool use of recycled Tetrapaks check out Doy Bags: <br/><a rel="nofollow" href="http://doybags.com/overview.html?PHPSESSID=36378d7b0d67179b4b68e44d85d01828">http://doybags.com/overview.html?PHPSESSID=36378d7b0d67179b4b68e44d85d01828</a><br/>
Yeah they are cool, but i think doy bags are different from tetrapak. They are basicly aluminium foil fused with polyethlyene. They are more flexible and thiner than tetrapak. And also there is no paper layer in them. Tetrapaks are more rigid and thick. Totally 6 layers of aluminium, polyethlyene and paper fiber mix.

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