Instructables
This Instructable will show you how to saw cut and patch a pothole in asphalt. Chances are you will never have the occasion to do this yourself but if so this is for you.

Step 1: Safety First

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You should always use eye protection, ear protection, and breathing protection when using a demo saw.

Step 2: Necessary Equipment

Demo Saw
asphalt patch
shovel
tamper
dust mask
ear plugs
safety glasses

Step 3: Cutting

Picture of Cutting
First make sure their is fuel in the saw. Next prime the saw, set to full choke pull until it turns over. Set to half choke, start let run for ten seconds set to run. Once you start the saw cut a square or rectangle around the border of the pothole a few inches from the edge.

Step 4: Clean out

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Once you have completed cutting use the shovel to remove all the large debris. Now take your broom and sweep most of the smaller debris and loose sand.

Step 5: Fill'er up

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Empty enough asphalt to slightly over fill the hole that you cut. Use your shovel to even it out over the surface of the hole.

Step 6: Pack it down

Picture of Pack it down
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Now that the patch has been spread evenly, take your tamper and pack it down. Start at the edges and move in to center. Once it is thoroughly compacted you can sweep some of the loose sand back over the surface to cover the tackiness on the surface. Now all you need to do is clean up your mess.
 
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james.m.k1 year ago
I don't suppose it's possible to cut concrete, do you know? The ground below my back door sidewalk has sunk and the concrete has tipped and broken. (Over 20 years ago, so the subsidence has stopped. But it's heck to shovel, and creats a nice pond of slush in the spring, and rainwater the rest of the time. Right in the middle of the walk.
They have dry cut diamond saws that cut concrete well. A sledge hammer or small demolition hammer will break it up. I have both I use in my ornamental metal business, but I would check with tool rental places. And often you can get good advice on what to use and how to use it from tool rentals. Lowes and Home Depot rent some tools, though I'm not certain if they rent those.
They have dry cut diamond saws that cut concrete well. A sledge hammer or small demolition hammer will break it up. I have both I use in my ornamental metal business, but I would check with tool rental places. And often you can get good advice on what to use and how to use it from tool rentals. Lowes and Home Depot rent some tools, though I'm not certain if they rent those.
They have dry cut diamond saws that cut concrete well. A sledge hammer or small demolition hammer will break it up. I have both I use in my ornamental metal business, but I would check with tool rental places. And often you can get good advice on what to use and how to use it from tool rentals. Lowes and Home Depot rent some tools, though I'm not certain if they rent those.
They have dry cut diamond saws that cut concrete well. A sledge hammer or small demolition hammer will break it up. I have both I use in my ornamental metal business, but I would check with tool rental places. And often you can get good advice on what to use and how to use it from tool rentals. Lowes and Home Depot rent some tools, though I'm not certain if they rent those.
Lucky7x7 (author)  james.m.k1 year ago
yes concrete can be cut out and ground leveled underneath. then build a frame box and pour new section with expansion joint between New pour and existing slabs.
oktex1 year ago
Hi all,

I am in the industry. (Decorative side of things)

Cold patch products are temporary at best.
To respond to comment about heat needed, yes it should be used if regular asphalt is being employed.

The components of cold patch don't respond to heat like normal asphalt and should not be used.

One tip: If you are going to saw cut the area heat should be used at edges and once warm, take a flat shovel and cut a chamfer on a 45 to give the edge a shoulder. Next fill the area as normal and you prevent shearing or dropping lower because of the support of the angled edge instead of a sheer edge.

Just FYI.


Lucky7x7 (author)  oktex1 year ago
thanks for tip on edges will have to try that sometime.
You just need to tamp it? No need to heat it?
Lucky7x7 (author)  audreyobscura1 year ago
With this product there is no need to heat. Once winter comes heat is useful to make the product more workable. but other than that if too much heat is applied you will burn off the oils that bond the gravel. There are hot patch mixes but this is the least expensive way and that is what most Property managers want ,Cheap and effective.
Audrey, this is what is known as "Cold Patch" and it is a patching solution and not meant as a permanent solution. Like most patches, it's not meant to be left exposed and is supposed to be covered in a sealant afterwards--otherwise the heating and cooling cycle of weather will cause the bonds to fail in a short while and the hole will now be worse as it is quite a bit deeper and square.

However, as property managers are quite cheap they never seem to get around to that sealing step and the hole gets worse and worse each passing day... My place got cited twice for having driveways that were so riddled with holes that the city had to come out and fix them the right way and charge the complex.
Lucky7x7 (author)  Spokehedz1 year ago
Spoke well stated about property managers but in Florida it is not so much the temp change as much as rain. Potholes in areas that water does not pond can last quite a while with just cold patch. But yes as you stated the ideal is to have lot seal coated regularly.
Toxictom1 year ago
I think it might be a good idea to also tamp the soil before using the patch to alleviate any settling that may occur.
Lucky7x7 (author)  Toxictom1 year ago
there is no soil underneath, at least not directly. limestone under asphalt and most older lots have been re coated with asphalt multiple times. if there is soil directly under asphalt that is a problem it would not hold up.