Instructables

How to use the Laser Cutter and or the Water Jet to make a Radius Check Gauge for organinc sheet metal work (Metal Shaping, Panel Beating, etc) I made it at TechShop

Picture of How to use the Laser Cutter and or the Water Jet to make a Radius Check Gauge for organinc sheet metal work (Metal Shaping, Panel Beating, etc) I made it at TechShop
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How to use the Laser Cutter and or the Water Jet to make a Radius Check gauge for Organic Sheet metal work (Metal Shaping, Panel Beating, etc)

I made it at Techshop.


This is going to be a really short and simple one, but if you are doing any sheet metal forming, especially using the Planishing hammer this will allow you to make a really useful tool yourself.

You can get this tool online for $20ish in plastic and $40ish in anodized aluminum, but with this Instrucable and access to Techshop, or equivalent tools, you'll be able to make one yourself. As an added bonus it'll have a cool TechShop logo on it with extra Texas Flair
since I'm a member at the Austin Round Rock Texas location.

(The red image is of a commercially made radius check gauge, I'll upload pics of the real one soon)

Step 1: What the cut file looks like

Picture of What the cut file looks like
Here is a gif of what the cut file looks like so you can visualize it better

Basically, you download the PDF I created here:

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B8Bg9eVVQhaYOWJkNWlaYnpyNGs/edit?usp=sharing

Or get it from step 3 of this Instructable

The red lines are cut lines, the black lines are etch. Pretty standard stuff here no surprises.

I replaced the '0' that marks the perfectly flat side on the professional one with a ruler
as I thought it'd be alot more useful in checking profiles and everyone knows a ruler is straight without extra
hints.

Step 2: The Vector Pdf file

Here is the vector Pdf file in case you have trouble getting it from my Google drive link.

You may have to play with the cut line stroke thickness, as I did one in Inches and the other in Metric and then copied and pasted them into one file. This causes the lines to be differing thicknesses. Simply select all the red cut lines  in Illustrator or Corel Draw, and change them to the thinnest stroke (i.e. hair line) before cutting.

 
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"Organic sheet metal work?"

Haven't heard that term before. Aren't we carry this "organic" business a little to far?  ;-)
caladin (author)  shannonlove1 year ago
It's the term used by techshop to describe the class, i call it "metal work"