Introduction: How to Wash Dirty Hands?

Hello,

Today I will show you haw to wash greasy hands covered with oil and break pads mixture.

Step 1: What Do We Need?

All we need today is a spoonful of kitchen salt or sugar or both if you want. And washing up liquid. All we need to get this extra rubbing action is adding grains of sugar or kitchen salt to the washing up liquid on your hands and you are sorted. Grains of salt or sugar change your washing up liquid into a rubbing paste and unlike sand that I used to use before will not cause any obstruction in your piping, because sugar and salt will easily dissolve in water.

This mixture can be also used as rubbing agent for cleaning stainless steel, your water taps etc. Be aware that adding any type of grains to washing up liquid can cause scratches to delicate surfaces, so I do not recommend you using this solution for e.g. mirrors or car lamps ;) That it enjoy the video.

Step 2: How to Wash Dirty Appliances?

This mixture can be also used as rubbing agent for cleaning stainless steel, your water taps etc. So additional items for this application may be a dish-washing sponge, and a small brush Be aware that adding any type of grains to washing up liquid can cause scratches to delicate surfaces, so I do not recommend you using this solution for e.g. mirrors or car lamps ;) That's it enjoy the video.

Step 3:

Comments

author
pfred2 (author)2015-06-30

For grit I use borax. In an emergency scouring powder and dish soap works good too. My favorite combination there is green Palmolive, and Comet. It makes this nice ammonia stench when mixed together. Then you know it's working.

author
Jobar007 (author)pfred22015-07-02

I'm with pfred2. Borax is my go to abrasive for cleaning off my hands of gunk.

author
Jobar007 (author)Max DIY2015-07-06

That's interesting. The U.S. National Library of Medicine lists it as non-carcinogenic. Elemental boron, on the other hand, is stupid toxic. Just like elemental sodium and chlorine. But if you combine sodium and chlorine together, you get a building block of life.

I wonder what research backs up that it is carcinogenic? Maybe it is a labeling requirement in your country?

author
Max DIY (author)Jobar0072015-07-06

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borax read the last section toxicity.

In my opinion the dose is always the answer we all contain a small amount of lead and osmium but yet we live and we have no problem with that small amount, but as soon as the concentration rises the adverse effects can become not only easily noticeable but they simply can go at exponential scale. So the simple idea is to minimise the exposure. In case of borax if u have to use it it might be a good idea to prepare a borax solution as the powder loves to fly everywhere, if u can use solution. As a hand cleaner powder is better solution but instead of using borax solution ( solution and solution ;) ) u can always use borax paste simply add a minimal amount of solvent i.e. water in this case till u get a proper thick paste that u can use when needed.

All best

author
Jobar007 (author)Max DIY2015-07-07

Absolutely! I always wet my hands before use to help minimize dust. I figured that doing so was common place with borax use since that's they way I was taught. I use a special dispenser (Boraxo brand that I inherited from my grandmother) to dose a small amount and that helps to keep dust down.

You are probably right about making a paste ahead of time to even minimize any dust at all. I'm always wary about fine dust particles since the finer it is, the more likely it is to cause damage to lungs. Thanks for the link to the Wikipedia article for clarification.

author
Max DIY (author)Jobar0072015-07-06

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borax read the last section toxicity.

In my opinion the dose is always the answer we all contain a small amount of lead and osmium but yet we live and we have no problem with that small amount, but as soon as the concentration rises the adverse effects can become not only easily noticeable but they simply can go at exponential scale. So the simple idea is to minimise the exposure. In case of borax if u have to use it it might be a good idea to prepare a borax solution as the powder loves to fly everywhere, if u can use solution. As a hand cleaner powder is better solution but instead of using borax solution ( solution and solution ;) ) u can always use borax paste simply add a minimal amount of solvent i.e. water in this case till u get a proper thick paste that u can use when needed.

All best

author
Max DIY (author)pfred22015-06-30

Haven't seen comet in eu, but thanx for the tip.

author
pfred2 (author)Max DIY2015-07-04

You may have to experiment with locally available products to find the pair that deliver the kick then. Other combinations of scouring powder, and liquid dish soap do work too. Comet and Green Palmolive just seem to me to be the most powerful. My daily driver when it comes to greasy hand clean up is borax and liquid hand soap. I have a clean as I go policy too. By that I mean I try not to let my hands get too out of hand, when it comes to getting dirty. I will take a break and wash up, just so I do not spread grime all over my workshop. I clean my tools if I get them dirty too. What annoys me now is I take all of the precautions I can, yet I still manage to get dirty. There really is no end to it, or avoiding it for that matter.

I plan on doing some metalwork today, so I'll be getting dirty doing that. I am convinced now that metal is just very well compacted dirt. Because as soon as I start cutting, and grinding metal, I release the mess then.

author
Max DIY (author)pfred22015-07-04

I saw your profile. I can c u do some carpentry too, sending u a link u should like it if u haven't seen it so far: https://youtu.be/W1pvUlQgYtk

author
Mindmapper1 (author)2015-06-30

Orange peel works well too!

author
pfred2 (author)Mindmapper12015-07-04

When I worked in a kitchen we'd clean these rings of black chud that would build up behind the slicing machine blades with lemons. That goo was some bad ju-ju, but we wanted something food safe to clean it with. Lemons worked OK. We'd use the whole lemon, sliced, and just rub it on the back of the running blade, like it was a scouring pad. Let the flesh of the fruit take up the slime. Then when the fruit got loaded we'd slice it for a fresh face.

author
Max DIY (author)Mindmapper12015-06-30

Thanx will try it one day

author
dmwatkins (author)2015-06-30

Another tip: Hand wipes, or "baby wipes," also do a pretty good job on grease. They are a great item to carry in your vehicle to clean up after roadside repairs.

author
Max DIY (author)dmwatkins2015-07-01

Ay, I use them when I have to but comparing to liquid soap or washig up liquid they r no match. Thanx 4 d tip.

author
pfred2 (author)Max DIY2015-07-04

When I used to commercial flat roof we all carried cans of hand cleaner in our cars. Because we'd have tar and other nastiness on us. You didn't want to glue yourself to your steering wheel trying to drive home either. There was this one called D&L Blue Label Hand Cleaner that was especially effective. Right on the can it said, "Contains a Solvent". I don't think today it is nearly as good as it used to be. It was a different age. Goop was so so, and Go-Jo a little better than Goop. D&L was the primo product.

I think if a guy broke out baby wipes he'd never live that down on the job site. So you can file that idea under the not gonna happen heading.

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willtwinkle (author)2015-07-02

that is a nice one , thank you

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Max DIY (author)willtwinkle2015-07-02

no problem warking on the next one

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jandersen5 (author)2015-07-01

always use coffee powder, its easy remove Olie/ dirt from your hands

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Max DIY (author)jandersen52015-07-01

never tried that, will try it next time my hands get dirty...