loading

First off you're gonna need a car. So today we are working on my old 1964 Buick Skylark. Since my engine is not stock (1971 Riviera 455 cubic inch big block the cooling fan previously that was installed is just not enough to cool it down. So we have bought a Ford Taurus 2-speed fan, this fan had rumored to cool down the biggest and some of the toughest blocks around! So today we are going to do the wiring part of the fan! This will take around 45 min to do or maybe less if you have some experience with cars and electricity work!

Step 1: The Equipment

Here is only some of the equipment we need to have in order to make this possible.

1- Zip ties

2- 2 packs of 10 Gauge wires

3- Wire Clippers

4- 1 pack of butt connections -10 gauge-

5- 1 pack of quick disconnects (male) -10 gauge-

6- Roll of electrical tape

7- Screwdriver

8- Pair of needle nose pliers or some clamps

9- Heavy duty 40 amp switch

Any of these parts can be purchased from an O'Reillys or Hardware Store

Step 2: Saftey

One main safety step is to unhook the BLACK (negative) wire from the battery, and when you do so make sure it will not touch the RED (positive) wire or any metal around it!

Step 3: The Setup

Above is the picture for our wiring plan!

Step 4: Wiring (first Part)

Get the wire situated and know which wire is ground and which wire is power! For instance the blue is our ground wire and the black is power wire.

Step 5: Wiring (second Part)

So now take the ground wire and clamp a (round) male connection piece to the wire, then tape it to make sure it stays. Next we will find a piece of metal inside the engine bay to screw it onto. Since we found a place in the car to connect it to, feel free to screw it in place! Now since it is in place continue to the next step!

Step 6: Wiring (third Part)

Now lets get the power wire in place. Get the 10 gauge wire and place it through the hole in your fire wall. This will be the wire that connects your switch to your fan power wire. So now we have a wire that goes through the engine bay to the cabin of your car! Now take the power wire from your fan and connect it to the wire that is going through the firewall. We will be using a butt connection to fuse these together. At the end of the power wire and the end of the firewall wire put a butt connection between them and clamp it together to make it stay in place. Now easily tape the wires and butt connection to hold it in place.

Since the wire is now connected we need to do a safety tip! Take some zip ties and tie them to a stationary place in your engine bay! Now cut the excess zip tie off for a clean look.

Step 7: Wiring (Final Part

The wire through the fire wall will now be connected to the switch. Unscrew the according link from ON position of the switch, put the wire around it and simply tape it! Then make sure the the blue wire on the Power link (middle link of switch) is connected to the main ignition wire of the car. This will be the big red wire that is connected to your ignition and sometimes even the red (positive) wire to your battery. This ignition wire will be in your cabin under the dash connected to your key system. Now take that blue wire and tap into the red wire (after the fuse) and tape it up!

Step 8: Last Few Steps

After this is all finished, connect the black (negative) wire back on to your battery. Now turn on the switch! Your engine should now be getting a cool breeze of air with no problems!

Step 9: You Are Done!

Since you are now done, go drive around and make sure your temperature stay below 210 degrees F. Go grab a drink or a bite to eat after this job. You deserve it!

Nice but a few suggestions i might add is you add a relay too save your switches from arching. Then use the thermostat for the switch cause they are low volts. Switches arent designed for high voltage and abuse but the relay is. You can get the current for the thermostat at a switched 12v that way it only works when the car is on, and the proper temperature.
<p>Yep! Relay Good!</p><p>DNAP420 I like your intelligent suggestions. When you say &quot;Thermostat for the switch&quot;, do you mean a Temperature Sensor Switch of some type or Cooling Fan Switch that mounts on the engine or radiator. If so do you know if they come in different temperature turn-on specifications? I'd like to do as described here, but with the relay, and I would like to have my cooling fan turn on at 160, or 180 degrees in the summer and a higher temperature in the winter. I would swap the sensors depending on the season.</p><p>Best Regards,</p><p>John</p>
<p>Nicely done! I hope you'll share more of your work on your car. Very cool stuff!</p>
Thanks! And maybe I will! I mean I did this project just for my engineering assignment but who knows maybe Ill do more work.
instead of a switch you can get a fan controler from the autoparts store for 20 to 30 and it will turn the fan on and off as needed like a factory fan would work
<p>Thanks for the suggestion guys! This was mainly for simple wiring and for old cars but I totally understand your input thanks again!</p>
<p>A temp switch that threads into the block/intake and relay can be had for around 10 if you want to make the harness yourself. But yeah I suggest a fan control of some type.</p>

About This Instructable

66,597views

20favorites

License:

More by Skylark64:How to wire a Cooling Fan to your car (DIY Electric) 
Add instructable to: