Introduction: I Can Make That Romper

My little one just sprouted up and outgrew her favorite jumper. It is such a simple garment and she loves it so much! I looked and looked for a replacement and found the romper pictured below from the Gap. $24.95 reduced to $14.99. Ha! Add shipping to that and it is a no go for me. Too expensive. I am DONEDIRTCHEAP.

I can make one for a dollar.

Step 1: Dollar Store!!!!

Dollar Tree is the best. I found a bunch of adult tees there and I let the girls pick out two colors that they liked. One dollar rompers, coming right up!

Here's a sped up video of me making them. I suggest that you pause it a lot; it goes by pretty quickly.


1. Cut out the tees from the bottom corners up. If you want to make really easy rompers you can cut all the way up to either side of the collar.

2. Cut up the middle about 3 inches to make the inseam. I cut too much and had to sew them back together. Growl.

3. Sew up the sides. If you are keeping the crew neck then don't sew the sides all the way up- leave arm holes.

4. Sew up and down the inseam, zip-zip.

5. If you aren't keeping the crew neck (red one pictured) and want to to do the ribbon straps (blue) then attach the ribbons to the inside of the front around the nipple line and between the shoulder blades in the back.

 
6. Fold over the top with the ribbons and stitch it in place. Viv's blue romper complete.

7. Overcast the arm holes of the red one to reinforce the shoulders. I added the white ribbon trim at Cookie's request. Pretty, huh?
 

Step 2: Buck Rompers

Don't they look lovely? Seeing them feel pretty in their new rompers is the best feeling in the world. What a rush!

I added the white ribbon to the waist of the red one to cover up a flaw in the fabric. It serves no other purpose.

Enjoy the smiles!

Comments

author
supersoftdrink (author)2013-08-12

Great instructable, and cute rompers!

Might I make one suggestion about the shorts?  It might be helpful down the road, especially if you use less stretchy fabric.

I drew a picture so you can see what I mean.  The blue shorts are how some people make them... they cut a slit in the middle and simply sew both sides together.  This doesn't work well for 3D shapes (like humans) unless the fabric is really stretchy like jersey.  Even with stretchy fabric, sometimes this method can make it can bunch up or hang in a weird way.

The green shorts are more how a lot of clothing manufacturers and pattern makers suggest doing shorts or pants.  The side view with the green outline shows a how the inside seams should generally fit.  You can make separate front and back sections (two of each, for a total of four that need to be sewn together), or make two separate leg pieces (like the picture with the blurred "seam" in between the front and back pieces).  If you make just two separate leg pieces, there won't be a seam on the outside edge of the shorts - it'll just be on the inseam and between the two halves.

If you're able to cut the romper from the t-shirt like the pink drawing... it might have a more even fit, even if you use a t-shirt with a bit less stretch.

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author

You are absolutely right about everything you said. That is why I love Instructables. Thank you for taking the time to draw these and send them. I'll make these modifications in the future.
Yours,
DDC

author
shazni (author)2013-08-07

You have lovely daughters and they model your outfit quite nicely!

author
AmyCat59 (author)2013-08-06

I've seen child-size sundresses made from adult t-shirts, but nothing like this before. And your girls look like they're having so much FUN in 'em! :-)

When it gets to be winter-time, check the thrift shops for flannel bed-sheet sets for warm-fabric clothes for your little ones... You could probably make an entire flannel shirt for one of 'em out of a pillow-case. (Hint: use scraps from the t-shirts, cut in 2" wide strips and folded lengthwise, to make rib-knit collars and cuffs, even on non-t-shirt fabrics... You get a semi-gathered effect, and it's a lot easier and cheaper than doing elastic cuffs...)

Also check used bookshops and libraries for the HASSLE-FREE SEWING books by Sharon Rosenberg; these were written by and for hippies and back-to-the-land commune-dwellers, so they're aimed at people like us who want to make our own style and do it cheap.
Here's an online source for them which *isn't* part of the Evil Amazonian Empire:
http://www.biblio.com/search.php?stage=1&author=rosenberg&title=hassle-free&pageper=20&omit_product_types=NS&strip_common=1&program=1005&order=priceasc

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