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Here we see how to make a quick IR flashlight.

We need:

-A battery

- IR led lights. You can either use the LED from an old TV remote, or buy them on eBay or any other electronic store (http://www.ebay.com/itm/5WATT-5w-5-modes-940nm-infrared-IR-LED-night-vision-flashlight-/180824820467?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a19ffcaf3). 840nm is the best range to make a flashlight: http://www.ebay.com/itm/5W-watts-High-Power-SMD-LED-Chip-Light-Beads-White-Red-Blue-Yellow-With-PCB-/201592318208?var=&hash=item2eefd6a900:m:mkk8ftfLZPagG0a3-uwXTzw

- A button (or a light switch)

-Insulating tape.

First, we have to cut some pieces of tape. Loop one end of the led light cable to an end of the battery, and secure it with tape.

Second, connect the button to the other end, and the last end of the button to the other pole of the battery. If you press the button, you should see a small light going out of the led. Any camera sees a little bit of infrared light, since the filters do not block out all the light that comes in, so we can check if our flashlight is working very easily.

Finally, we just put everything together so there are no loose cables using tape, and we are ready to play!

See here how to make a IR night vision camera from an old point and shoot pocket camera!

https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Point-and-Shoo...

...or how to do it with the cheapest camera I could find online!

https://www.instructables.com/id/Night-vision-tiny-...

<p style="color: black;">Hi Joe,</p><p style="color: black;">Neither the LED's from TV remotes, not the 940nm ones that you link to will be terribly effective for photography. You need something around 830..850nm LEDs for that and they'll seem much &quot;stronger&quot;.</p><p style="color: black;">Here's a selection.</p><p><a href="http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2050601.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H0.X840nm+ir+leds.TRS0&_nkw=840nm+ir+leds&_sacat=0" style="color: rgb(3,71,190);">http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&amp;_trksid=p...</a></p><p>Have a nice day :)</p>
<p>Sorry I left this message unreplied... you are right, the LEDs I used aren't the most efficient ones, but I had them around from another project. Anyway, the problem with the &quot;high power&quot; LEDs is that they require stronger currents (12-14V), or then use the 6V (5W) ones, which are quite dim too... anyway, I will add a comment in the instructable, I think you have a very good point! </p>
<p>Sorry for the late reply (I haven't got any email notifications for a long time).</p><p>I probably should have linked to something like </p><p><a href="http://www.ebay.com/itm/SOTTOCOSTO-100-pz-led-IR-5-mm-infrarosso-840nm-ART-SP23-/262421712775?hash=item3d198d8f87:g:jP0AAOSwYmZXKx6S" style="color: rgb(0,50,169);">http://www.ebay.com/itm/SOTTOCOSTO-100-pz-led-IR-5-mm-infrarosso-840nm-ART-SP23-/262421712775?hash=item3d198d8f87:g:jP0AAOSwYmZXKx6S</a></p><p> instead. Compare one of those to a 9nn nm type and you'll know what I mean. The high powered one will be even better, of course, but the difference between these 840 nm (5mm) and the tv-remote type will be very large seen through a cam.</p><p>Have a nice day :)</p>

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