Instructables
Picture of Improved Table Saw OFF Switch
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This is a very self explanatory one-step instructable.  I made this large OFF switch for my Makita MLT100 table saw which has a plastic body.  Hence it was easy to screw the hinge to it after pre-drilling some pilot holes.

Now I can turn off the saw with my knew without having to look or feel for the OFF switch.  It make the TS use much safer and comfortable.

I was inspired by a post I had seen on a forum of a very similar concept.   I improved it by adding a large hole in the plank so that you can easily reach the ON swicth.  I used the router with a small roundover bit to smoth the edge of the hole, but you could use a fine rasp or sand paper on a dowel.

Depending on what type of stationary power tools you have, this could be adaped to fit a wide variety.

That’s twice I’ve seen your table saw now.
I have one exactly the same.
IS THE TOP OF YOUR TABLE SAW FLAT?
Mine is like a roller coaster.
I placed 2 square squares facing each other in several different locations, at the top of the squares the gap changed from overlapping to a good 3 mm gap.
Spoke to makita, sorry you made changes to your rip arm by screwing wood to it, you have void your warranty.
Long story short, wrote to several managers with no luck, and wrote to makita Japan head office, I even translated it into Japanese.
Reply I got was that is within our tolerances, if you want a flat top on your table saw I would suggest purchasing a more expensive one.
Near fell off my chair when I read that reply.
Up to that point I had nearly 40 makita tools in my work shop
Have never purchased another Makita product since.
domino88 (author)  broken board1 year ago
Hi Broken Board!
Thanks for sharing your experience. No, I would not say that my tablesaw top is flat, neither did I expect it to be. :-) I had read negative reviews on that aspect, so I guess I was not disapointed. In fact, the saw exceeded my low expectations... I live in a country where I do not have to much choice on tools and this was the best option I could find. I would have gone for a BOSCH, had it been available then. One thing I did like about it was that the top was quite large and in aluminum, hence does not rust. I live in a tropical climate and that is big help. I also like all the small extensions that come in handy once in a while.
the mitre gauge was totally useless. But I build a cross cut sled (see my other instructable) and a 45 deg mitre sled. Once the sleds are calibrated, the cuts are quite accurate and repeatable. Soon I will add an ajustable angle feature and a tenoning jig that can both be attached to my crosscut sled. That will add versatility. I will post instructables

Somehow, I understand Makita's point of view in their undiplomatic answer to you: they have to strike a balance between perfection and cost target. It's not advertised as a cabinet or furniture making saw, it's meant to be a portable worksite saw. The degree of accuracy required for house building and even finish carpentry is not the same as that required for fine furniture making. I could have paid 3 times more to buy a JET cabinet saw, but I did not want to spend the money and my workshop could not handle the size and weight of a cabinet saw. This makita gives me more flexibility for the time being. With some sleds and tweeks, it is quite usable to make furniture and I'm quite happy with it. One day, I hope to have a larger workshop and a proper cabinet table saw.
So simple! But great idea! I have a triton and the off switch which is supposed to be easily turned off by hitting it with your knee is a pain. I will be using your 'ible to remedy this - thanks!
domino88 (author)  bricabracwizard2 years ago
I'm happy this could help!
pfred22 years ago
I put some thought into where I wanted to mount the switches that control my table saw. Often it is all about location, location, location. As an odd aside due to how I wired it, the toggle switch on the left can shut the saw down, but not start it, so I often use it to turn my saw off. Which I'm sure says something about careful planning, though I'm not quite sure what.
james123cb2 years ago
I work in a saw mill town. It's amazing how many hands I shake that are missing a finger.

Nice simple instructable that makes any work shop safer!
Thanks for sharing