Introduction: Indian Masala Dabba, Spice Tiffin, Spice Box

Picture of Indian Masala Dabba, Spice Tiffin, Spice Box

Indian masala dabba is a round stainless steel box with seven round compartments along with a small teaspoon measure which fits in the box. The Indian cook will then fill these compartments with his/ her seven favorite regularly used spices. Spices need to be stored in a dark cool place.

Here are the common spices that you can put in your masala dabba by filling them with spices as you see fit .Here are some suggestions:  Red chili powder, Turmeric, Garam masala, Cumin powder, Cumin seeds, Black mustard seeds, Coriander seeds, Asafoetida, Coriander powder.   Cooking Indian will become a breeze as you will be able to find all the spices you need in one place. 

I wanted a spice box, but did not want to pay $30, $40, $45 or even $65 for one. After looking at those prices, I wanted to make one.  I was look around for how to make one, but can’t find any information. So for some time I did not think about it. Until I was getting stuff for chrisms and found the tin boxes, and soon all the pieces fill in. (This is my first upload, so there are some mistakes.)

Step 1: Items You Will Need

Picture of Items You Will Need

So here what I made:

1.       First you need:

 

1. Tin (I used square tin cost: $3.50 plus tax) wal mart

 

2. Labels (I use dissolved labels cost: $ not sure I got then years ago, but you can get some labels for $1 plus tax) dollar tree

 

3. Small contain (cost: $1 plus tax. I used 3 packs) dollar tree

(They need to fit into the tin.  I used small one. They need to not tapper.  If they tapper, they will move around in the tin.  This is the hard part is find containers that will work in tin. It took me 3different containers to find the right one.)

 

5. Snack bag (cost: $1.60 plus tax) family dollar

 

6. Small spoon (cost: $ 00.25 plus tax) Theft store

 

4. Spices (cost: Up to you)

 

Total: $10.01 (not including spices)

Step 2: Tin

Picture of Tin

 

1.      You need to take off the red ribblen. (The ribbed was easy removed.)

 

2.      Clean off the glue that was left after the ribblen was taking off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3: Key to It All.

Picture of Key to It All.

1.      See how the containers will fit together in the tin any how any you will have.

 (My tin fit 3x3x2. 3 across, 3 long, and two high. So 9 each level and 2 level. So I end up have 18 containers to fill. This will change depending on size of tin and size of containers.)

Step 4:

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1.      Now fill the containers with spices.

2.      Write on the labels the name of the spice and date the spices were put in. Place the label on the top of the containers.

Step 5: All the Part Together

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1.      Place the containers in the tin.  

(As you can see I have some space to the bottom and on one side of the containers in the tin. That space is where I put long spices like: dried chili, cinnamon, bay leafs. Along the side I put a spoon, for using with the spices.)

Step 6: Last Step

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1.      Fill the snack bag with the long spices and put them in the bottom of the tin.

2.      Put the small spoon on the side or bottom.

3.      Put the top on and you are done.

Step 7: Side Note

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SIDE NOTE:

·         The spice boxes are easy to use, make, replace and clean.

·         They stack them up and can be put in your cabinet.

·         They are not just used for spices. I used one for tea and cake decorson.

·         They are not just used for Indian food. I cook a lot of different cuisines. So I use then for seam seed, achiote seeds, dried herbs, and nuts

 

 Side information:

The shelf lives of spices are different. You never really need to worry about them going “bad” like other foods do. For example, a bottle of curry powder that’s been around a questionable amount of time probably won’t make you sick.  It will just be less potent.

• Ground spices (nutmeg, cinnamon, turmeric): 2 to 3 years
• Herbs (basil, oregano, parsley): 1 to 3 years
• Seasoning blends: 1 to 2 years
• Whole spices (cloves, peppercorns, cinnamon sticks): 4 years
• Seeds: 4 years (except for poppy and sesame seeds, which should be discarded after 2 years)
• Extracts: 4 years (except for vanilla, which will last forever)

Sorry for any and misspelling.

Comments

jennifer.guertin.963 (author)2015-03-07

I was thinking of doing something similar, then walked into a local Indian Grocery and found a stainless steel Masala Dabba spice tin with 7 containers inside and 2 spoons (no spices) for $12.99. So clearly this is a better choice than buying online!

I already had the spices so I'm ready to go!

SoSyrious (author)2014-02-05

Very very nice... :>