Introduction: Inexpensive Front and Rear Bicycle Bright Led Lights With Three Operating Modes-solid White, Solid Red or Flashing Red

These lights I put on my bike to improve the chances of being seen by a passing motorist. I am not sure if they meet any federal or state requirements for bike lighting. So before you try these check out your local regulations.

Parts for bicycle front and rear lights

2 ea. Emergency 39 LED Triangle Worklight from harbor freight HFT® - Item#62158 which I purchased on sale for $2.99 ea. These lights have three modes, flashing red, solid red, and white. They have 39 led lights, run on three AAA batteries and are supposed to last 48 hours.

2 ea. 3/16 by 1" long bolts and nuts + washers. The size will depend on how you are mounting them. I had these on without reflectors and I read where all bicycles in the US are required to have front and rear reflectors so I added them back.

If you are putting reflectors back on you will need to figure what works for your particular set up. I used some thin metal strips and had to add washers so the screw that goes into the reflector did not bottom out breaking the reflector.








Step 1: Remove Reflctor From Bike

I removed the reflector and arm from the bike and then removed the reflector from the arm. The light will be mounted to this piece and then put back on the bike.

Step 2: Remove Back of Light

Turn the light over and remove the two screws in the back of light. At this point you can remove the hook if you want by taking the two screws out holding the hook in and remove the hook out the back. You can skip this and leave the hook if you want. Then place the back of the light on two strips of wood not covering the magnet and using a punch knock the magnet out. This hole becomes the mounting point for the light.

Step 3: Bolt Reflector Arm to Light

If you are just mounting the light to bike without reflector being attached to the light you can bolt the arm on to the back of the light using the bolt with washer. The reflector can be mounted to the light using a strip of metal. I read where front and rear reflectors are required on all bicycles in the US for safety so it is a necessary to mount the reflectors back on the bike.

Step 4: Adding Reflector to Light

When I added reflector to metal strip the reflector screw was too long so I added washers to it so it didn't break the reflector when tightened.

Step 5: Attach the Light to the Bike

I attached the light back to the bike. I repeated these steps for the rear light with the exception of thr reflector which I attached to my rear carrier. I turn the front light to solid white and the rear to flashing red when I ride.

Comments

author
gjp627. made it! (author)2017-03-06

great economy lighting system! I hardly think 'John Law' would ever investigate the legality of your choice of construction and it definitely gives you a good amount of visual recognition...I will use this and thank you for your instructable

author
MichaelS1064 made it! (author)2016-12-13

I like the idea of this, I am just curious as to what distance the lights can be seen from and how well the front one lights the road/path?

In Texas we can ride at night without the reflector on the back of the bike if we have a red light.

Sec. 551.104. Safety Equipment


(a) A person may not operate a bicycle unless the bicycle is equipped with a brake capable of making a braked wheel skid on dry, level, clean pavement.

(b) A person may not operate a bicycle at nighttime unless the bicycle is equipped with:



(1). A lamp on the front of the bicycle that emits a white light visible from a distance of a least 500 feet in front of the bicycle; and

(2). on the rear of the bicyle:


(A) A red reflector that is:


(i) of a type approved by the department; and

(ii) visible when directly in front of lawful upper beams of motor vehicle headlamps from all distances from 50 to 300 feet to the rear of the bicycle; or

(B) lamp that emits a red light visible from a distance of 500 feet to the rear of the bicycle.

(C) In addition to the reflector required by Subsection (b), a person operating a bicycle at nighttime may use a lamp on the rear of the bicycle that emits a red light visible from a distance of 500 feet to the rear of the bicycle.

author
ajwingnut made it! (author)ajwingnut2016-12-13

https://youtu.be/OxWw2jRJhTo


https://www.instructables.com/id/Inexpensive-Front-and-Rear-Bicycle-Bright-Led-Ligh/


These lights I put on my bike to improve the chances of being seen by a passing motorist. I am not sure if they meet any federal or state requirements for bike lighting. The front light is adequate for me but where I ride there are a lot of street lights.



author
reptilehead made it! (author)2016-12-11

I like how you added the reflectors to the design. As a suggestion, I found that you get less of a chance of water in the light if the switch is on the bottom. It also puts the triangle in the correct position for the "caution slow moving vehicle" warning.
So far in the past month, I still have yet to replace my batteries and they still work great.

november entry.jpg
author
ajwingnut made it! (author)ajwingnut2016-12-11

Thanks, good idea about having the switch on the bottom and I had not thought about the slow moving triangle. Your lights look great.

author
DIY Hacks and How Tos made it! (author)2016-12-11

Nice bike light. I really need something like this to improve my visibility while riding at night. I just need to find a good way to use solar power to keep the batteries charged.

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