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A band clamp lets you clamp many different shapes for gluing that would be difficult to pull together with just standard bar or pipe clamps. Want to make a picture frame? Use a band clamp!

You can easily and cheaply make your own band clamp to use on rectangular frames, furniture, circular objects, hexagons, octagons, n-gons …. and clamp anything of practical size!

You will need a 4" by 10" hardwood board 3/4" thick, a 5" by 20" piece of 3/16" (tempered) hardboard, a 1/4" and 3/8" hardwood dowel (e.g. oak, don't use poplar or pine), a 4" long 3/8"-16 hex bolt (or rod) fully threaded, a 3/8"-16 T-nut, a #8 hex nut, ten or more feet of 3/4" heavy Nylon webbing, four 3/4" triglide sliding buckles, and wood glue. For tools you need a table saw, a band saw, and a drill press.

Step 1: Construct the Corner Jaws

The band clamp consists of a number of jaws, a band that wraps around the jaws, and a tensioning mechanism that pulls the band around the jaws to tighten them on the work piece.

For a rectangular frame you need three jaws to hold three of the corners, and a fixed jaw and tensioner for the fourth corner.

To make these corner jaws, cut out a 4” diameter circle from ¾” hardwood. Drill a 1/8” hole through the center. Cut two 5” by 5” squares from 3/16” hardboard (actual thickness is less than 3/16") , and also drill 1/8” holes through their centers. Use nails to line up the hardboard centers with the hardwood circle, and glue the block together. The hardboard edges should line up as shown in the pictures.

After the glue dries, print and cut out the drilling template 1 and stick onto the square block with rubber cement. Then drill the ¼” and 3/8” holes as shown all the way through the block.

Use a band saw to cut the block into quarters, and cut out the jaw corners (1” square) on each piece. You will cut through the 3/8” holes, its part of the design. Finally trim off the diagonals on each piece.

Cut eight pieces 1-1/8” long off a 3/8” hardwood dowel. Use an oak dowel; pine or poplar is too soft. Glue these dowel pieces into the 3/8” inch diameter half-holes. The dowels will function like ‘swiveling’ jaws to accommodate clamping joints that are not at 90 degrees.

Cut eight pieces 1-1/8” long off a ¼” hardwood dowel and glue into the top/bottom holes in the hardboard. These dowels will retain the band for the clamp. There should be enough space between these dowels and the circular edge of the hardwood to thread the band through.

Lightly sand and clean the edges and faces on the four corner jaws you just made. Set aside.

Step 2: Construct the Fixed Jaw and the Tensioning Mechanism

Start with a 3” by 4” piece of ¾” hardwood. Trim off ½” on each side along the 4” dimension. Cut one of the trimmed pieces in half - use the band saw or hand saw, its too small for the table saw! You will use these three pieces of ¾” hardwood: one piece of 3” by about 2-7/8” (depending on the kerf of your table saw blade), and two pieces ½” by about 1-1/2”.

Cut two pieces of 3/16” hardboard to 3” by 4”.

Now glue together a block (hardboard – hardwood – hardboard) as shown in the diagram and pictures. I used pennies stacked and taped together during the glue-up to create the slot for the clamping band. Remove the penny spacers after about 15 to 20 minutes before the glue completely dries.

After the glue dries, attach template 2 to the top and side of the block; and drill holes in the top and into the side as indicated.

On the band saw notch out the fixed jaw, cutting through the 3/8” holes as in step 1; then cut the block in half along the line indicated on the template. Mark the two pieces as to how they go together, you really want the side-holes to line up! You now have the fixed jaw and the moving slider for tensioning.

On the fixed jaw glue in four 1-1/8” long dowel pieces (2 each 1/4" and 3/8") similar to step 1. Sand the edges clean and the dowels flush.

Cut two 5-inch long pieces of 3/8” dowel. The dowels should be able to slide back and forth smoothly through the moving piece. If necessary, sand the dowels (you can do this with a drill press, see picture). Glue the dowel pieces into the fixed jaw piece. Use the moving slider to keep the dowels aligned while gluing.

Step 3: Install the Tensioning Bolt

Install a 3/8”-16 T-nut in the center hole of the moving slider on the side that is facing the fixed jaw. You will have to drill a shallow 7/16" recess around the center hole to accommodate the T-nut. Insert a 3/8”-16 threaded rod (or 4” long bolt threaded all the way) through the T-nut. As you screw in this rod/bolt it will push against the fixed jaw and push the moving slider outward. Press-fit a #8 hex nut into the center hole of the fixed jaw so the rod/bolt turns against it, protecting the wood at the bottom of the hole; see picture. You can make a handle for the hex bolt to tighten the clamp, or you can use a 9/16" wrench to do it.

Step 4: Finish All Parts

Finish the corner jaws, fixed jaw, and moving slider with varnish or polyurethane so that wood glue won’t stick to it, and will be easier to clean off. Do not paint the dowels and the holes in the moving slider; it might stick if you do!

Step 5: Install the Band

Get a 10 foot (or more, up to infinity!) length of ¾” wide heavy Nylon webbing (the band) and four ¾” triglide buckles. Thread the webbing through a buckle, the left side of the fixed jaw, another buckle, then through the left slot of the moving slider, the left side of the fixed jaw, the first buckle, and three corner jaws. Complete the same arrangement on the right side. The pictures show how its done.

There are probably better ways to adjust the length of the band, i.e. cam levers, compression screws, spring loaded buckles, etc. The simple triglide buckles I am using are cheap, easy, and they seem to work well. Feel free to improve and then share your design.

Step 6: Use the Band Clamp

Always adjust the band length before applying glue to the work piece and do a dry-fit. Wrap the band clamp around the work piece, and align the jaws with the corners. Pull the band taut on the left side and adjust the sliding buckles. You may wish to use masking tape on the jaws to prevent glue from sticking to it. Be sure you don't get any glue on the sliding/tensioning dowels and mechanism. Turn the bolt with a 9/16" socket wrench to pull the jaws tight against the work piece. Make sure your work piece is flat and square, and let the glue dry.

For rectangles, use 3 jaws plus the fixed jaw. For six-sided work pieces, use 5 jaws plus the fixed jaw. For n-sided work pieces ….. well, you get the idea!

Yes, you can buy clamps like this, but where is the fun in that?

Happy Clamping!
Key Words: Clamp, Band Clamp, woodworking, glue up, frame, hexagon, octagon, furniture making, assembly

<p>Maybe you can use cork for the dowels with a strong axel. The cork is soft and should avoid marking your pieces.</p>
<p>Yes, cork pads/sticks would work, and so would short pieces of vinyl/rubber tubing. As with any clamp, you want to protect your work piece with pads or scrap pieces of wood to prevent it from marring or denting.</p>
<p>This one, at band clamp....</p>
<p>Hi, I've added your project to <em style="">&quot;</em><em style="">The Ultimate Collection of DIY Workshop Tools</em><em style="">&quot; </em>Collection</p><p>Here is the link If you are interested:</p><p><a href="https://www.instructables.com/id/The-Ultimate-Collection-of-DIY-Workshop-Tools/">https://www.instructables.com/id/The-Ultimate-Colle...</a></p>
Cool project! Could even try 3D printing for the clamps :-)
<p>Nice! :{)</p>
<p>SOS UN GENIO! abrazo</p>
<p>very nice. How do you prevent the dowels from denting softer woods?</p>
<p>You can use rubber or plastic pads, small strips of wood, leftover hardboard squares, etc. to distribute the pressure more evenly between the jaws and the work piece. For most of my work I use strips of wood between the jaws of pipe clamps, bar clamps, etc. and the work piece to protect it from marring.</p>
<p>Clever, I will need to make one or two of these.</p>
<p>this is great I have no idea why I never thought of making one myself :-) I bought one a few years ago and it cost me over $30 for it :-/ now I think I will make a couple for myself and save my self the money :-) I have enough of the items around the place to make a few without having to spend money :-)</p><p>Thank you for sharing this :-)</p>
<p>This is great! Best garrotte clamp ever, the bought ones aren't this good. Kudos.</p>
<p>Why not just leave the round pieces out so that the 90 degree square hole fits right against the 90 degree corner?</p>
<p>If you want to glue up any joint that isn't 90 degrees. e.g. an hexagonal or octagonal shape, the round dowels function like swivels to better grab the work piece. If you only plan to clamp rectangular frames you may leave the round dowels out; however you run the risk of glueing the clamp jaws to the work piece as there wouldn't be any space between the two. </p>
If you were going to glue a hexagon or octagon you would need more then 4 of these, so you could make up the pieces that you would need for each of the shapes and just use the same ribbon for each. As far as glueing them to the work piece, you could just use some bendable plastic or plastic wrap on the edges of the work piece. I have done that before. Most wood glues wont hold to the plastic making it easy to remove.
<p>Lovely idea, well executed, superb docs.</p><p>Rubber pads for the jaws to prevent denting?</p>
<p>Yes, you can use rubber pads, small strips of wood, leftover hardboard squares, etc. to distribute the pressure more evenly between the jaws and the work piece. For most of my work I use strips of wood between the jaws of pipe clamps, bar clamps, etc. and the work piece to protect it from marring.</p>
<p>---for a second, I read &quot;band camp&quot;, but the pictures cleared that up. Nice directions.</p>
<p>Very good idea,And I don't care what anybody says.I must say it is a great idea. ;-)</p>
I love this. but don't the round ends of the clamps make dents in the wood if you tighten it?
Yes they could. You can use some flat wooden pads between the clamp and the work piece to protect it, like you would with any clamp. Thanks for pointing it out.
<p>Couldn't you use Aluminum angle iron 4 inch to make wider foot.I imagine you would also use a heavy piece of plywood and glue them together somehow.With this idea of the band clamp I'd say you can come up with a idea that works as good as the clamp.Looks interesting.I truly like it also. </p>
<p>Could you use elastic bands instead of the ones you used?</p>
<p>Won't be strong enough. The whole point of him using the rope and the 'vice' is to pull the rope as tight as possible.</p>
<p>I think a webbing that is not flexible (or stretchy) will transfer the clamping force more efficiently and evenly to the workpiece. Also, an elastic band would give you extra play, so you would need a much longer bolt to tighten the clamp. </p>
<p>This ideia it's very, very intelligent, simple, cheap and others adjectives....</p><p>Congratulations!!!!</p>
Very, very nice. Thanks for sharing.
<p>Practical and real. This is going to be my next woodworking gadget.</p><p>Thanks for sharing.</p>
great idea, gotta make me some of these! <br><br>great instructable, very well documented!
<p>I shall make one of those really soon</p>
<p>Thanks, let me know how it turns out!</p>
<p>Thanks for sharing! Cheap and simple, one of the cleverest ideas ever seen.</p>
<p>Thanks!</p>
<p>Fabulous instructable... superb idea.</p>
<p>Thanks!</p>
This one time at band clamp.... <br><br>Great Instructable :) I have a passion for homemade tools.
This is so funny; I had thought of the very same line from 'American Pie' as a possible title for my Instructable!
this is a good idea, glad you posted it
<p>Thanks, I'm glad you found it useful.</p>

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