This instructables shows how to convert your remote control car to use one rechargable and long lasting battery. This less expensive retail store bought model uses 6 AA batteries that require constant replacement. This instructable can be applied to any remote control car the only variation being the voltage, addressed in another step.

Step 1: Disassemble

Disassemble vehicle and expose control board or internal battery terminals.  The main internal battery terminals are below the circuit board on the back of the battery holder.

Step 2: Solder Wires to Battery Terminals

Locate the main battery terminals either on the board or on the vehicle battery holder.  All of the AA's connect positive to negative in series.  Locate the beginning point and ending point of the series.  Solder a long wire to the each of these two points.

Step 3: Reassemble and Choose Battery

Reassemble body and drill hole for battery wires.  Solder battery connector that matches the connection type of the new battery.

Rechargeable batteries vary in voltage, current, type and size.

This particular RC truck used 6 AA batteries which means that they control board has voltage regulation and circuitry engineered for 9V.  The servo and motors are also designed for 9V.  AA batteries are 1.5V.  1.5V x 6 = 9V.  A 8V NiMH was chosen for this application.

Step 4: Attach Body

Secure the battery and reattach the body.
This "off the shelf" walmart car isn't really designed to receive upgraded components. That being said it is not possible on this car since it has an integrated speed controller and receiver on one PCB board. There is probably a way if you purchased an ESC (Electronic Speed Controller) and bypassed the circuit board completely. This would be an extensive hack and not worth it since you would have most of the components anyway and could buy a normal RC chassis.
Hi Bro, <br> <br>I have ordered a 2,4 Ghz RX/TX for the same car to increase the range of control. Could you please be kind enough to guide me to replace the receiver with the 27Mhz stock one? <br> <br>Thanks: Abhiman.
another part to remember is the rechargeable packs are 1.2 volts each battery vs. alkaline which are 1.5 volts each. so 6 AA alkalines are 9.0 volts, and 8 NiCd or NiMh rechargeables are 9.6 volts. <br> <br>we use the 9.6 volt packs wired in parallel with the AA's in the battery tray and get about a 45 minute run time with the rock crawler like the one pictured.
Is that the rock crawler truck available at wal-mart? I forget the brand. Maybe nikko?
yehh the brand is maisto
I basically did this same thing on the same type of RC, a maisto rock crawler. However, I used a rechargeable 9.6v nicd battery to power mine. that thing could powerhouse over almost anything i threw at it. Highly recommend doing this mod for the maisto rock crawler. (Or most other toy grade rc cars that take AA's) <br>
got the same maisto crawler lol, is just a piece of shit, doesn't have nuff power to climb anything, crappy battery, maybe i'll change for a lithium one
your rechargable battery must be the same voltage as the combined battery power otherwise your control board or your motor which was not designed to handle the much voltage will burn out although a hot fix if you want to be a friend i don't recomend it otherwise you could add a boost mode <br>
This is kind of what I was thinking. This particular RC truck used 6 AA batteries which means that they control board has voltage regulation and circuitry engineered for 9V. The servo and motors are also designed for 9V. AA batteries are 1.5V. 1.5V x 6 = 9V. A 8V NiMH was chosen for this application.

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Bio: Electrical Engineer
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