Introduction: Custom Iron-on Patches With No Embroidery or Sewing

Patches are a great way to add detail to a costume, but can be relatively expensive for a one-use fancy-dress outfit.

In this instructable, I'll show you how I made some Iron-on faux-embroidered patches, Using T-shirt Transfers, An old pair of Jeans, and some Iron-on Hemming.

PLEASE VOTE FOR THIS INSTRUCTABLE IN THE "PRINT & DYE" CONTEST!

The patches I made are copies of commercially available "Umberella Corporation" badges, but you could make any design you want.
Originals:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B009QZPCXA
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0076IKAOA

Step 1: Making the Transfers

First, Print your designs onto inkjet printable t-shirt transfer paper - get the stuff for dark / black t-shirt.

Ideally, your images should be photographs / scans of actual patches, to give the illusion of texture; or you could add a fabric texture in photoshop (if you can't do either of these, don't worry ; they will pick up some texture from the denim)

Cut them out roughly, then peel them from the backing.

Step 2: Getting the Design on the Denim.

Place a transfer print-side up on a scrap of denim from an old pair of jeans.

Cover it with non-stick baking parchment, and iron.

Your iron should be on its hottest setting, and you should press down hard. Press; do not slide the iron around.

Leave the paper in place while the denim cools, then carefully peel it off. The design will stay on the denim.

Step 3: Making the Iron-on Backing / Frey Protection

Roughly cut the denim around the design, then lay it print-side-down onto the parchment.

cover the back of the piece with iron-on hemming, and then another layer of the paper.

Repeat the pressing, cooling and peeling from the last step.

You should coat the backs even if you plan to sew-on the patches, as it will help to prevent the denim from fraying.

Step 4: Cut and Apply

Finally, cut out the patches, and you're done!

When it comes time to attach them, you can either sew them in place, or just place them where you want the, and (once again) cover with the parchment, press, cool, and peel; The hemming will re-melt and adhere the patch to the costume.

Comments

author
artrash (author)2017-01-01

will they smudge/fade after a few washes? im planning to make some for my jacket

author
Will_Tingle (author)2016-04-15

Raquel - that's exactly why I came up with the method;

author
raquel.llanes.7 (author)2015-04-01

BRILLIANT!!! OMG, what a fantastic Idea especially for a costume you are only going to wear once!

author
Will_Tingle (author)2014-08-08

Yeah, I don't see why it wouldn't work for that - thanks!

author
Welldweller (author)2014-06-03

This is awesome and may be an easy solution for plushie eyes since actually embroidering them without a machine is a pain in the butt! Thanks for the tut!

author
Will_Tingle (author)2013-09-18

Ha! Sorry - I posted it literally within an hour of testing it worked!

author
ecsaul23 (author)2013-09-17

sweet! where were you a few weeks ago when I was looking for iron patches?? Thanks for sharing, next time I know how to do it myself

author
Will_Tingle (author)2013-09-14

Thanks. Please vote in the print and dye contest.

author
shaunak (author)2013-09-13

Hey - this is an amazing idea! Thanks!

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