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Nose mucus plays a very important roll in the healthy function of our bodies. Its flushing protection is kind of a garbage removal and the color helps to indentify what kind of garbage it’s helping remove. But, most importantly is the protection it provides for our respiratory systems. However, does the kind of mucus make a difference? Does using protectant gear worn over our noses make a difference?

Step 1: Research Time

February 26th, 2014 Time: 2 hours 15 minutes
6:30 p.m.- 8:45 p.m.

As I began to consider and research for a topic for a science experiment, I was fascinated and grossed by human snot. I then began gathering information about snot. Using the search bar in Google, I entered "What is snot?" I learned the following facts concerning mucus:
1. Mucus or phlegm are the proper terms when discussing snot.
2. I learned that mucus is a key part to my health.
3. Mucus membranes inside my nose protect me by secreting and stopping germs, pollen, and dust.
4. Mucus and nasal hairs combine as a barrier to protect my lungs.
5. A runny nose can show inflammation and irritation in a body.
6. The color of my mucus can help identify if I am sick.
7. When I have a cold, I secrete up to 60 milliliters of mucus an hour. To my surprise, that equals almost a fourth a can of pop! So in four hours, it would equal one can of pop.
8. Mucus is mostly water and contains proteins, carbohydrates, salt and some cells.
9. Mucus contains a specialized cell type known as a goblet cell. . Most of my mucus drains down my throat without me noticing.
10.Violent nose blowing could cause me to become sicker.
11. A new scientific study just released suggests bacteriophages or phages found in my mucus may actually infect and kill invasive bacteria.

Step 2: Hypothesis

My hypothesis was that different types of mucus’s would capture just as much dust as protectant gear would for a nose.

Step 3: Develop a Survey for Distribution

March 5th, 2014 Time: 2 hours 10 minutes

6:00 p.m.- 8:10 p.m.

Created the following survey to distribute and collect information from a wide variety of people.

Science Questionnaire

This questionnaire is for research information concerning my upcoming science project. Circle the answer that best fits for you. Thank you for your participation.

1. Please fill in your age: ______ Please select your sex: male female

2. Do you have mucus (snot) currently in your nose?

Yes No

3. Should you have mucus (snot) in your nose?

Yes No

4. Does your nose feel:

Runny Congested Dry Normal

5. Is your mucus:

Runny Congested Dry Normal

6. If you have allergies, what season of the year is worse for you?

Spring Summer Fall Winter All the time

7. When you have an allergy attack, is your nose:

Runny Congested

8. Have you ever used an expectorant (such as Mucinex)?

Yes No

9. Have you ever used an antihistamine (such as Allegra or Benadryl)?

Yes No

10. In the winter when you have a dry nose with headaches. Does putting moisture in the air help your symptoms

Yes No

11. Do you use protectant gear in dusty situations? Example: Heavy sweeping, Sanding, Sawing wood, Weed eating, etc.

Yes No Sometimes

12. Do you use protectant gear in situations where there are a lot of fumes? Example: Painting, Cleaning with chemicals, etc.

Yes No Sometimes

Step 4: Designing a Nose Prop

March 15th, 2014 Time: 7 hours 30 minutes

10:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. (30 minute lunch break)

I brainstormed with a mentor about a display prop for my scientific project to display my findings. After deciding on a model, with his assistance, I began making a prop. First, I constructed a wire frame for my nose model using wire, wire cutters, zip ties and twist ties. This took 3-4 hours. Then I covered my frame with newspaper strips dipped in a glue solution. I left this on a table to dry until next working session.

Step 5: Passing Out Surveys

March 18th, 2014 Time: 30 minutes

30 minutes

This session was accumulated time from meeting a contact person from Phillips Pharmacy. In this time I explained the survey and the purpose and how to instruct people to do it.

Special note: While they had fun doing it, they also commented that it made them aware of their nose. It helped create awareness in them about the medicines they used and whether they used protection gear for their nose.

March 25th, 2014 Time: 15 minutes
15 minutes

I gave a contact person several copies of my survey to be filled out by coworkers at their office.

Special note: The contact person said she heard her coworkers chuckling when they filled out their surveys. Indicating that unlike some surveys, this one was enjoyable to participate in.

Step 6: 6 Bring on the Slime Recipes and Claying the Prop

March 19th, 2014 Time: 2 hours 15 minutes

5:00 p.m.- 7:15 p.m.

I took my wire frame covered in paper strips and began applying a paper mache clay all over my form. After this, I began researching for mucus/slime recipes. I also researched information concerning mucus and how it helps my body. I was also looking to see if there had been any new information posted on the web concerning my project focus since I began researching.

I chose some recipes from the sites below:


chemistry.about.com/od/letsmakeslime/‎
www.sciencebob.com/experiments/polymer.php
https://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experime...
www.hometrainingtools.com/a/slime-recipes-project...
http://www.elmers.com/

Step 7: Nose Touch Up and Experimenting With Recipes

March 26th, 2014 Time: 2 hours 45 minutes

5:00 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.

I examined my prop and noticed that my clay was dried, but I found some places that needed more clay. I applied the clay and set my nose prop aside to dry.

Then I began experimenting with the following ingredients:
warm water
green food coloring
20 Mule Team Borax
Elmer's Carpenter's WoodGlue
Aleene's Clear Gel Tacky Glue

My first recipe was 1/8 cup of borax in 473.18 ml of warm water and I stirred until the borax was dissolved. In another bowl, I stirred together two teaspoons of glue gel and three teaspoons of water.I added a few drops of green food dye and stirred. I then poured both mixtures into a baggie. I then sealed and squished the mixtures together. The mixture stayed runny and never became a slime.

So I poured the mixture back into the bowl and began adding the glue gel, hoping to have a chemical reaction to form thick slime. I used a whole bottle of gel which consisted of 118 ml and still did not have the expected result. Now I had a problem. The glue gel was too expensive to keep experimenting with to perfect my recipe. So I substituted wood glue for the glue gel and began again. I cut the water down to 236.59 ml and substituted the glue. The mixture was still too runny, so I kept adding glue until it thickened. The mixture had too much of a wet plastic feel and did not feel like slimy mucus. Although my experiment failed, I had a lot of fun playing with it!

Step 8: More Prop Work and More Recipes!

April 2nd, 2014 Time: 2 hours 30 minutes

6:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Began my session with painting my paper mache nostril with white roofing sealant. Then I began experimenting again with different recipes and ingredients and amounts in search of the perfect slime/mucus. I made five different mixtures during the night. Not all of the ingredients were the same in each mix.

The following ingredients were used:

Elmer's Carpenter's Wood Glue
STA-FLO liquid starchArgo 100% pure corn starch

IDAHOAN real premium mashed potatoes

Hudson Cream self- rising flour

I recorded four of the recipes as possible mixtures for my experimental sessions. I still wasn't satisfied that I had not found the desired slime.

I decided to research more on slime recipes before my next working session.

I also began painting my nose prop.

Step 9: Continuing the Search for the Perfect Snot...

April 9th, 2014 Time: 3 hours

5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.


I tested mucus recipes again in this session. After experimenting with gelatin, corn syrup, and water, I finally felt that I was beginning to have the desired texture. After I tested with the above ingredients, I eliminated using the previous mixtures from last session.

Observation: It amazed me that there could be such a variation in texture and feel in all of the different solutions that I tried. And even when I mixed the recipe following the printed directions-most of the time my results did not equal what was posted.

Step 10: Back to the Nose Prop

April 16th, 2014 Time: 4 hours

1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

I met with my mentor first thing at the beginning of the session. My mentor and I discussed what I needed for my nostril prop. After determining what I needed, we went to Lowe's to pick up some plastic tubing. Then we went to the Dollar Tree to buy some fake snot to use on a later date in my final presentation. When I got back, I started to work on figuring out a way to attach the break away part of my nose to the main structure. My mentor and I thought about it and came to a conclusion. We decided to use wire to hang the break away part to the side of my main structure. I drilled entry holes in my main structure and placed the wire in the holes I drilled. I then did the same to my break away piece. I tied the wire in the inside of the main structure and break away piece. I then used the extra wire on the break away piece to hook on to the loop I created with the wire on the main piece.

Step 11: Let the Snot Run...

April 23rd, 2014 Time: 4 hours 5 minutes

5:00 p.m. - 9:05 p.m.

Now that I had my solution, I created a testing board to use for my experiments. I used the following items to construct my board: 20” x 21” black foam board, hair brush with bristles, pliers, clear contact paper, a black Sharpie marker, yardstick, a hot glue gun and glue. Once I had my board finished, I was ready to begin the experiments!

Before each experiment the testing area was prepared using the following steps:

1. I measured a piece of freezer wrap 36 inches long and cut it.

2. From one edge of the freezer wrap I measured and drew a line the length of the paper with a black permanent

sharpie. This would be the line for the placement of the filter in the future experiments.

3. The freezer wrap paper was placed on the testing area first.

4. Then the backboard was placed on the back edge of the freezer wrap.

5. The plunger was removed from the syringe and the syringe was filled with 37 grams of flour. After the syringe

was filled, I replaced the plunger.

6. The solution representing my mucus was prepared using tap water, light corn syrup and unflavored gelatine.

7. Depending on which test, I would applied the correct mucus solution to the testing board

8. The testing board was propped up against the backboard

9. If the test involved the filter, an assistant would stand the filter on the black sharpie line.

10. Then using the syringe I would spray the testing area with the flour.

11. If the test involved the filter, it would gently be removed from the area.

12. Using a metal knife I would collect the flour from the freezer wrap paper.

13. Then I poured the flour back into the syringe and recorded a measurement of how much flour was in the syringe and recorded it.

Then testing was done with the exception of the following steps. Steps 1 and 2 were only done for the first experiment and not repeated. All following experiments began on step 3. Step 6 was not done for the control group. Step 8 was done only with the experiments involving the filter.

First Experiment-no mucus with filter

First, I prepared the testing area. The freezer wrap with the measured line was placed on the table. Then the backboard was placed on the freezer wrap paper lining up with the back edge of the freezer wrap paper. The plastic syringe was filled with 37 grams of flour. I applied no snot to the testing board and I stood it up against the backboard. Then my assistant held the filter on the black line which was drawn on the freezer wrap sheet. I sprayed 37 grams of flour to the filter. I then collected the flour from the freezer wrap sheet and measured it. From my measurements, I determined that the filter captured 11 grams of flour and 26 grams of dust was collected from the freezer wrap sheet. Testing area was cleaned for next experiment.

Observation: The filter blocked all visible flour! Wow, wasn't expecting it to stop all of it like it did.

Second Experiment-no mucus

I prepared the testing area. The freezer wrap with the measured line was placed on the table. Then the backboard was placed on the freezer wrap paper lining up with the back edge of the freezer wrap paper. The plastic syringe was filled with 37 grams of flour. I applied no snot to the testing board and I stood it up against the backboard.I applied no mucus to the testing board and I stood it up against the backboard. The bristles which represented nostril hairs captured some dust. The rest of the dust immediately fell to the freezer wrap sheet. I then collected the flour from the freezer wrap sheet and measured it. From my measurements, I determined that the bristles on my testing board captured 3 grams of flour and 34 grams of dust was collected from the freezer wrap sheet.

Observation: I considered this to be an acceptable representation of nostril hairs.

Third Experiment-runny mucus with filter

The testing area was prepared and the freezer wrap with the measured line was placed on the table. Then the backboard was placed on the freezer wrap. The dust syringe was prepared with 37 grams of flour. I applied runny mucus to the testing board and then I stood it up against the backboard. Then my assistant held my filter on the black line which was drawn on the freezer wrap sheet. I sprayed 37 grams of flour to the filter. I then collected the flour from the freezer wrap sheet and measured it. From my measurements, I determined that the filter captured 17 grams of flour and 20 grams of dust was collected from the freezer wrap sheet. The testing board was cleaned with water and then dried with a hair drier for the next experiment.

Observation: The mucus immediately ran down the testing board with more than half the amount of snot on the sheet.

Fourth Experiment-runny snot

The testing area was prepared and the freezer wrap with the measured line was placed on the table. Then the backboard was placed on the freezer wrap sheet. The dust syringe was prepared with 37 grams of flour. I mixed my runny snot solution and applied it to the top area of the testing board and then I stood it up against the backboard. Then dust was applied to the snot. I then collected the flour from the freezer wrap sheet and measured it. From my measurements, I determined that the testing board captured 8 grams of flour and 29 grams of dust was collected from the freezer wrap sheet. Testing area was cleaned for next experiment session.

Observation: Once again, most of the mucus immediately ran down the testing board. Since the mucus was runny, it could not capture the dust. From these two experiments, I concluded that there is no way that a runny nose provides much protection for the respiratory system.

Step 12: Prop Work...Again

April 29th, 2014 Time: 5 hours 20 minutes

12:25 p.m.- 5:15 p.m. 8:30 p.m.- 9:00 p.m.

I started the session by re-checking the information from my first group of experiments. After that, I started to brainstorm on ways to pour my slime out of my nose prop during my presentation. I decided to use plastic tubing for a storage area. I injected the slime mixture into my plastic tubing to determine how much tubing I would need to use. I then coiled the tubing and hot glued it together. I also made a stand using popsicle sticks and hot glue. It was made to hold my container of slime which would represent my snot during my presentation. After trial and error, I realized that this would not be feasible to use. So I used a short piece of a 2" pvc pipe for a chute. I mounted it on the stand that supported my nose model. During my presentation I would dump different canisters of slime that would slid down the chute and drain while I was talking.

Later in the evening, I finished painting my nose prop.

Step 13: Wrapping Up the Experiments

May 6, 2014 Time: 2 hours 30 minutes

2:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Fifth Experiment-normal mucus with filter
I started the session by mixing my normal mucus so it would have time to set and become the desired mixture. Then I prepared the testing area following the previous procedure listing. I applied the normal mucus to the testing board and then stood it up against the backboard. My assistant held the filter in front of the testing board. I sprayed 37 grams of flour to the filter. From my measurements, I determined that the filter captured 18 grams of flour and 19 grams of dust was collected from the freezer wrap sheet. After the experiment, I cleaned the testing area and I washed and dried my testing board.

Observation: The result was the same as it was with all my other experiments with the filter.

Sixth Experiment-normal mucus without filter

I prepared the testing area. I applied the normal mucus to the testing board and I stood it up against the backboard. Then I sprayed the flour on my testing board with the normal mucus. From my measurements, I determined that the testing board captured 25 grams of flour and 12 grams of dust was collected from the freezer wrap sheet.

Observation: I only expected it to capture about half of the flour. The normal mucus laid flat on the testing board without having deep ridges. It was sticky and didn't run down the board, it captured most of the flour out of all my experiments. The mucus held a thin layer of flour all over its surface.


Seventh Experiment- Thick mucus with filter

I prepared my thick mucus for the experiment and I prepared the testing area. I applied the thick mucus to the testing board and I stood it up against the backboard. My assistant held the filter in front of my testing board. I sprayed the flour onto the filter. From my measurements, I determined that the filter captured 13 grams of flour and 24 grams of dust was collected from the freezer wrap sheet.

Observation:

Once again, the filter blocked the flour and the mucus appeared the same at the end of the experiment compared to how it was when I started the experiment.

Eighth Experiment- Thick mucus without filter
Testing area was prepared for the next experiment. I prepared my thick mucus for the experiment. I sprayed the flour on the mucus. From my measurements, I determined that the testing board captured 18 grams of flour and 19 grams of dust was collected from the freezer wrap sheet.

Observation: Since the mucus on the testing board had a lot of ridges in it, it held some of the flour in the mucus ridges rather than sticking to the thick mucus. The flour piled onto itself.

Step 14: Final Paperwork

May 7th, 2014 Time:

2:30 p.m. - 7:30

I reviewed my informal journal entries and prepared my formal journal, presentation speech and designed graphs.

It’s Snot a Bad Thing

Table of Contents

Abstract, Introduction, Experimental Procedure, Data, Results, References

Abstract

Mucus and its color play a very important roll in the healthy function of a body. A most basic purpose of nose mucus is to protect the respiratory system from foreign objects from entering the respiratory system.

Do the different kinds of nose mucus change the filtering capabilities of our nose mucus and what effect does protectant gear have. I hypothesized that different types of mucus’s would capture just as much dust as protectant gear for a nose.

To test my hypothesis, I determined that I wanted to use a solution to represent four types of mucus’s and a filter to represent a mask worn over a person’s nose in dusty situations.

I established guidelines for all four tests to follow. The filter captured all visible recordable measurements of flour. That led to that set of data that never changed. Each of the four types of mucus’s reacted differently.

I concluded from my survey that many people do not understand the importance of mucus. People should use masks or other respiratory gear in any situation where airborne particles are present to help protect the respiratory system by providing another layer of protection.

I proved my hypothesis to be wrong. Mucus alone does not protect as well in dusty situations as protectant gear for the nose.

Introduction

I hypothesized that different types of mucus’s would capture just as much dust as protectant gear for a nose.

While researching a different science project, I came across some basic information concerning the nose and its functions. When it came time to do another project and I began researching various possibilities – I was still fascinated with the functions of the nose. So I began researching different topics about the nose and its functions.

I never realized before how important the mucus in my nose was or what it really did. So I created a survey and distributed to 106 people of various ages. From the answers that were selected, I learned that many people do not understand how important it is to protect their respiratory systems. 52% of the people that were surveyed never use protection in dusty situations. Only 30% of the people used protection sometimes and the smallest group of only 18% protected their noses with protectant gear.

I also learned and researched why doctors are always interested in the color of my mucus when I am sick with sinus problems. Various colors present with different possible sicknesses and symptoms so colors can help doctors to identify.

With the presentation of my project to various individuals, I hoped to raise awareness about the importance of how their nose mucus works and how extremely important protectant gear is for their respiratory systems. I hope to show them that they cannot depend on their nose mucus to do all the filtering for their bodies in very dusty situations. I want to make people aware that often symptoms such as discoloration in the mucus appear when they do not use protection and it can lead to illness in their respiratory systems.

Results

First Experiment-no mucus with filter

Observation: The filter blocked all visible flour! Wow, wasn't expecting it to stop all of it like it did.

Second Experiment-no mucus

Observation: I considered this to be an acceptable representation of nostril hairs.

Third Experiment-runny mucus with filter

Observation: The mucus immediately ran down the testing board with more than half the amount of snot on the sheet.

Fourth Experiment-runny snot

Observation: Once again, most of the mucus immediately ran down the testing board. Since the mucus was runny, it could not capture the dust. From these two experiments, I concluded that there is no way that a runny nose provides much protection for the respiratory system.

Fifth Experiment-normal mucus with filter

Observation: The result was the same as it was with all my other experiments with the filter.

Sixth Experiment-normal mucus without filter

Observation: I only expected it to capture about half of the flour. The normal mucus laid flat on the testing board without having deep ridges. It was sticky and didn't run down the board, it captured most of the flour out of all my experiments. The mucus held a thin layer of flour all over its surface.

Seventh Experiment- Thick mucus with filter

Observation:

Once again, the filter blocked the flour and the mucus appeared the same at the end of the experiment compared to how it was when I started the experiment.

Eighth Experiment- Thick mucus without filter

Observation: Since the mucus on the testing board had a lot of ridges in it, it held some of the flour in the mucus ridges rather than sticking to the thick mucus. The flour piled onto itself.

Summary

Based on my survey questionnaire and the findings from my experiments, I concluded that many people do not understand the importance of mucus. I also determined that people should use masks or other respiratory gear in any situation where airborne particles are present to help the body by providing another layer of protection.

I also proved my hypothesis to be wrong. Mucus alone does not protect as well in dusty situations as protectant gear for the nose.

In conclusion, mucus plays a big part in the health of our body. Mucus was designed by God to protect our respiratory system from harmful invaders. So just remember, mucus may be gross, but it’s snot a bad thing.

References

Bone Up on Boogers. (n.d.). Kidzworld. Retrieved February 26, 2014, from http://www.kidzworld.com/article/3267-bone-up-on-boogers

Elmer's Glue & Project Supplies | Instant Glue, Wood Glue, Craft Glue. (n.d.). Elmer's Glue & Project Supplies | Instant Glue, Wood Glue, Craft Glue. Retrieved March 19, 2014, from http://www.elmers.com/

What Makes Snot Turn Green?. (2010, February 1). » Scienceline. Retrieved February 26, 2014, from http://scienceline.org/2010/02/what-makes-snot-turn-green/

Let's Make Slime. (n.d.). . Retrieved March 19, 2014, from http://chemistry.about.com/od/letsmakeslime/%E2%80%8E

January 25. (n.d.). Mucus Mucus Everywhere. Retrieved February 26, 2014, from http://sciencenetlinks.com/daily-content/1/25/

Kristiansen, N. (2014, January 21). Where does all the snot come from?. . Retrieved February 26, 2014, from http://sciencenordic.com/where-does-all-snot-come

Make Your Own Slime. (n.d.). . Retrieved March 19, 2014, from

http://www.sciencebob.com/experiments/polymer.php

Poole, B. (2008, January 26). The Naked Scientists. What do Snot and Wasabi have in Common? -. Retrieved February 26, 2014, from http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/articles/article/science-of-snot/

Saey, T. H. (2013, May 20). Viruses and mucus team up to ward off bacteria. Science News. Retrieved February 26, 2014, from https://www.sciencenews.org/article/viruses-and-mucus-team-ward-bacteria

Slime Recipes. (n.d.). Make Slime with White Glue and Borax. Retrieved March 19, 2014, from http://www.hometrainingtools.com/a/slime-recipes-project

SO YOU THINK BOOGERS ARE FUNNY DO YA??? in General Discussion Forum. (n.d.). Topic. Retrieved March 19, 2014, from http://webkinzpost.yuku.com/topic/3472/SO-YOU-THINK-BOOGERS-ARE-FUNNY-DO-YA

Steve Spangler Science. (n.d.). GAK. Retrieved March 19, 2014, from http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experiments/glue-borax-gak

Step 15: Conclusion

It's Snot a Bad Thing!!!!!

“Eeewww! That’s so gross!” This is the most common remark people say concerning snot or what is known as mucus from the nose. Mucus plays a very important roll in the healthy function of our bodies. Its flushing protection is kind of a garbage removal. The color of our snot shows us just what kind of garbage it’s helping remove.

Most doctors and scientists agree that the basic purpose of nose mucus is to protect our respiratory system from foreign objects such as bacteria, viruses, grains of dust, pollen and other unwanted invaders from entering our respiratory system. Snot takes these invaders back out our noses or down into our stomachs.

Does the kind of nose mucus really make a difference? Does using protectant gear really assist our nose mucus in protecting our bodies? I hypothesized that different types of mucus’s would capture just as much dust as protectant gear for a nose.

I prepared a survey before I did my experiments and distributed them to a large variety of people. I wanted to compare my survey results against my test results. I began exploring different ways to prove my hypothesis. I determined that I wanted to test four types of mucus: runny, normal, thick and no mucus. I also wanted to use a filter to represent a mask that would be worn over a person’s nose in dusty situations. I determined that in my experiments color would not be a factor.

I established guidelines for all four tests to follow. Each test involved 2 experiments-one with a filter and one without a filter. Next, I designed a testing area that would be the same for all eight experiments. I set up my experiment area as shown in my photos. I used the same procedures when I collected, measured and recorded the dust that was not captured by the filter or the different kinds of mucus.

It was very difficult to find slime recipes that represented the three kinds of mucus. Through trial and error I chose a recipe that consisted of tap water, unflavored gelatin and light corn syrup. In my experiments the mucus would be the only variable that would change.

I began my testing with the control group that did not have a mucus solution. I realized two things with my test. In the first experiment the filter blocked all of the flour. In the second experiment the bristles that represented nose hair functioned like the real thing. In each of the following experiments the nose hair followed the same pattern with holding the mucus in place and helping to capture dust.

After all my experiments were finished I compared my results and observations. I was surprised to find that the filter captured all recordable measurements of flour. That led to that set of data that never changed. The runny nose was not effective because the mucus was not in the nose long enough to capture any flour. The normal mucus had a layer of flour across all of its surface. Most of the flour in the thick snot was captured in the ridges rather than on its surface.

In my research, I learned that clear or slightly yellow mucus indicates a healthy nose. Dr. Harry Malech from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases explains that green mucus receives its coloring from iron found in an enzyme that might indicate a bacterial infection. Rusty colored mucus can be a sign of bleeding from an airway. And last, mucus that is dark colored can be dust and dirt that was captured in the mucus. Based on my survey questionnaire and the findings from my experiments, I concluded that many people do not understand the importance of mucus. I also determined that people should use masks or other respiratory gear in any situation where airborne particles are present to help the body by providing another layer of protection. I also proved my hypothesis to be wrong. Mucus alone does not protect as well in dusty situations as protectant gear for the nose.

In conclusion, mucus plays a big part in the health of our body. Mucus was designed by God to protect our respiratory system from harmful invaders. So just remember, mucus may be gross, but it’s snot a bad thing.

<p>Awesome! And Gross! But totally cool! Thanks for sharing this on Instructables.</p>
<p>Thanks!!! Wanted to do something different.</p>
<p>Duuude. This is my favorite science project. I wish you'd used more process photos here so I could feature this to the homepage. Next time?</p>
<p>It was kind of hard to get photos while he was working on it. I'll check and see if there are some other photos we can add to it also. </p>

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