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This Instructable is for  responsible viewers who understand the basics of lockpick making but  want to combine their picks into a small portable design. I have found that this design works quite well if you like the look of the Southord Jackknife pick or other similar products on the market but are unwilling to dish out the money for one. I designed mine with only frugality in mind as i did not even go to the hardware store to buy materials. For some of you, this is great news, but for others who want a higher quality pick, you might want to consider investing more time and dishing out some extra money for higher quality materials. Please note that this is not the most well put together design and i will note a few things that you could do to produce better results as all of us weekend builders know: you sometimes never know how to build it right until you've built it wrong. That's why there's Instructables right? Thanks for checking out my first Instructable and feel free to leave a comment. Again, this does not fully show how to make the picks, just how to combine them into a small, pocket sized tool.

NOTE: I MADE THIS BECAUSE AND ONLY BECAUSE I FIND LOCKS AND LOCKPICKING INTERESTING. I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANYONE WHO MISSUSES MY IDEAS AND ENDS UP WITH A TRIP TO THE POLICE STATION OR WORSE. PLEASE, DO US ALL A FAVOR AND TRY YOUR HARDEST NOT TO ACT DUMB, EVEN IF YOU WERE JUST BORN THAT WAY. THANKS!

Step 1: Materials and Tools

Materials :

1. Windshield Wiper Inserts
These are dead useful in the world of lockpicking as they are perfect not only for tension               wrenches but also for smaller picks. You can find them at your local mechanic shop in the trash.
2. Hacksaw Blades
These are hands down the best readily available pick making material out there. Buy them in  Packs of 3 or 5 and get the least expensive ones as which kind you get doesn't matter much.
3. Two Screws and Three Nuts
Find two screws that fit into the holes at either end of the blade when you buy them. Also you
will need three nuts that fit onto your screws. 
4. Piece of Rubber Tubing
This is used to hold the tension wrench on the side of the pick's body attached by tape or epoxy

The tools you need are:
1. Screw driver
2. Dremel
3. Bench Grinder (or files if you don't have one)
5. Pliers
6. Drill with Bit that fits into the fore mentioned holes
7. Vice (not neccessary but sometimes helpful)

Step 2: Make Your Picks and Body


You can put anywhere from 3-10 or even more picks into one tool, it is your decision. There are too many great guides to making picks out there so it would be redundant for me to explain how to do this. One decent one by }{itch is great but i do not think his heating and cooling method is necessary. Make sure however that the picks that you make are 1/2 an inch shorter than the body that I will now explain how to make (this is the part i messed up on).
To make the body you need to emulate the pre-done end of the hacksaw blade on both sides of a 3-inch piece of blade. Drill an extra hole on one side for a keyring if you want.

Step 3: Make Tension/Torque Wrench


This is the piece that is used for putting pressure on the cylinder of the lock while picking it. Some examples are pictured below. Use your windshield wiper inserts to make them with pliers and the vice. If you need to, use a stove, blowtorch, or  a lighter to heat it up. You can also do this with an old allen key with your benchgrinder. I like to twist mine as it prevents you from putting to much pressure on the lock. The bottom one has been twisted in this way.

Step 4: Assemble the Parts

This part is self explanatory, use the screws to assemble the pieces, it's not rocket science.

Step 5: FInished!

Slap it on your keychain and walk around feeling like McGuyver.
<p>cool project</p>
I really don't like correcting people, but this always bugs me.<br><br>The proper term is torsion or torque wrench. Tension and torsion are two different motions. Tension pulls things apart. Torsion twists or spins them. Therefore, a tool used in the manner of a wrench that is meant to apply turning force is called a torsion wrench, see? <br><br>I can see where the confusion stems from - the torsion wrench does seem to &quot;tense&quot; up the lock. But that is a misuse of the word tense, as explained above.<br><br>Anyways, great instructable, if I had better tools I would definitely try it.
They have been calling that &quot;wrench&quot; a TENSION wrench since before you or I were born....No kind of &quot;logic&quot; is going to change a thing. They will continue to call it a tension wrench tomorrow...and the next, and &quot;forever&quot;. Kinda gotta deal with it :-)
TRY YOUR HARDEST NOT TO ACT DUMB, EVEN IF YOU WERE JUST BORN THAT WAY, thats the best way putting it
yeah ive heard that before but as thats what everyone calls it i just slip up sometimes. wasnt really paying attention to what i was writing. thanks for the comments though

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