Introduction: Jose the Tequila Dispenser. (or Any Other Liquids, Mainly Shooters)

Picture of Jose the Tequila Dispenser. (or Any Other Liquids, Mainly Shooters)

My fiance and myself build "Jose" for a Mexican themed birthday party we had, but now he has become a permanent feature when we have guests over

This is somewhat of an adult nature so no kids or people who are easily offended. We will try to sensor the description and photos where possible, but be warned.


The materials as well as the process I used may not be available to everyone but I am sure it can be substituted

Equipment used:
PVC welder
Cordless drill/screwdriver
Paintbrush set
Scissors
Rotary cutter (Dremel 300)
Hacksaw
Permanent marker

Materials used:
Body/Frame:
140mm outside diameter PVC pipe (agricultural use) x about 4 meters
5 x 5 x 3 triangular PVC welding rod

Face and other features:
Polystyrene balls 150mm outside diameter x 2
Polystyrene balls 35mm (if I remember correctly) x 5
Various colors artists acrylic paint, mainly green
Fake beard and mustache from a party shop
Air-drying modelling clay
Various screws
Old (or new, I really don't mind) newspapers
Cold wood glue, I used Ponil
Cake flour
Primer
Super glue

Stand:
120mm x 35mm x 2 meter pine plank
HDPE cutting board
Even more screws of varying diameter and length

Door:
Small door hinges
Locking mechanism

Finishing touches:
Old worn out linen
Sombrero

Temporary tank:
2 liter cold drink container (empty)
3 liter "wine bag" removed from box (emptied before.... only because we had to)

Step 1: Cut and Weld Main Body

Picture of Cut and Weld Main Body

I used the 140mm PVC tubes only because I had some left over from a job we did. The original plan was to build the body out of paper mache reinforced with wire mesh

I decided to make Jose 2 meters tall, so that was my first cut of the PVC pipe.

His arms each consist of two parts each with one part 350mm long and one around 400mm

I used the hacksaw to cut the tubes of the arms at a 45 degree angle half way in (difficult to explain so please see photos), and one end of each of the 350mm long pieces were cut to fit the profile of the main upright tube (again, see pictures, it's not as complicated as it sounds)

Using my plastic welder I joined the tubes for the arms at the elbow (note gap right on corner to fit section of polystyrene ball to be added later to give rounded effect) and then the arms to the main body.

At this point I decided at what height I wanted the tap and cut a square hole at the back of it to insert the tank. I made it around 1,1 meters for obvious reasons. The hole is around 350mm high and the width is exactly half way into the tube. I originally wanted to have a fixed tank, but a removable one makes cleaning/replacing easier.

I should have drilled the hole for the tap round about this time, but I was not sure about the tap I would be using yet

Step 2: Adding the Features

Picture of Adding the Features

The next step was to cut the 150mm polystyrene balls into 3 halves and 2 quarters. The 3 halves to be glued using wood glue (for a temporary fix without attacking the PST) on top of the head and each arm and the quarters for the elbows. Once the glue dried I used the Dremel to sand the 150mm down to the 140mm outer diameter of the pipe

I decided on a correct height to place his face and did a rough drawing with the permanent marker. You might pick up later that the face is based on a certain celebrity, if not it means that either my skills suck or you don't watch enough TV

We covered the whole body and arms with paper mache made from the newspaper torn to strips, as well as water, cake flour and the wood glue. We did not cover the area where the face will be as well as the door at the back (for obvious reasons). The paper mache is used to hold the elbows etc in place, to hide any imperfections as well as giving it a rough (hopefully more natural) look

Using short self tapping screw, attach the section cut out to make the hole for the door to the hinges, and the hinges on the body to make the door. I welded thin pipe sections to the door for a better seal (see pictures)

Step 3: Adding the Face and Features

Picture of Adding the Face and Features

I cut the smaller PST balls in halves and some even smaller to use as a base for the eyes, nose, chin and....a bit lower.

I used various length chipboard screws to attach the ball segments to the PVC body were necessary. As the face will be formed out of clay, these screws acted like anchors to hold it to the body

Clay was used to wrap over and around the face, formed until I was satisfied with the look. This was my first time working with the clay and looking back I still have a lot to learn, but I was happy with the result

The clay needs to be left to dry for a few days.

The whole body was primed to make the paper mache water proof and to add to the strength of the paint's adhesion. We used plaster primer left over from another project

Once the primer had properly dried we painted the whole body and face using acrylic paint that we had lying around. Originally I wanted to used automotive spray-paint

After the paint dried I used more acrylic paint to paint the eyes and red "glow" on the cheeks, nose, bottom lip and chin

We could not find a mustache and eyebrows that we liked so we bought a mustache and beard from a party shop and used the scissors to cut it to the shape we needed.

Once cut we glued the brows and mustache to the face

Step 4: Base and Tank

The base is just temporary, as I have much bigger plans to follow

I screwed the pine planks (cut to the height of the bottom of the door) to a HDPE cutting board I had lying around and the PVC tube of the body fits over the plank.

I am not going into too much info as this will be replaced in the near future

By cutting the top section off a 2 liter cold drink bottle and inserting the "wine bag" we made temporary tank which worked very well. I will eventually replace this with a proper welded up HDPE or polyprop tank with it's own tap.

By opening the door and inserting the tank from the rear, the tap fits through a hole drilled in front for easy access

Step 5: Finishes

Picture of Finishes

We cut a hole in an old piece of linen to act as a poncho and added the sombrero. The sombrero hides the tap and is easily moved out of the way to pour.

We ran 3-4 bottles of tequila through Jose on his first night and he was a great hit

Comments

AD804 (author)2012-09-19

Thanks for the comment. I will add pictures of the tap installation as soon as I can.
We made it this big to have it "life sized". You should see the pictures. Because we installed the tap to represent his...well tap, some pretty nice photos were taken. I am planning another design for an upcoming event and will post it as soon as I am done

BarginsTech (author)2012-09-18

Hahaha funny!! He is a little big though O.o is there an idea on a smaller one? Maybe a single bottle size guy? I would bee cool to see pictures of the tap installation :]

AD804 (author)2012-09-03

Oops, I meant to say the poncho hides the tap. It would not make sense to have the tap on his head

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