loading

Most of the work was made using a Leapfrog Creatr 3D printer.

The "insects" were fabricated with 2 - 20 parts, "cut" in Netfabb, and then "welded" together with acetone/abs slurry. They were then sanded and painted.

The classical and architectural pieces were made from scans and found digital models. Some were found for free on the internet (e.g. http://lincoln3dscans.co.uk/), some were bought on-line, and others were scanned myself with Photoscan (as were the 2 architectural images on black used in my videos: http://vimeo.com/user3872342/videos).

I printed theses sculptures in PLA, in sections (ones that would fit on the Creatr build platform) and then glued the sections together with epoxy and Liquid Nails. I then filled in the cracks with auto and wall filler. I finally painted the sculptures with spray paints. The Stalin sculpture with the spot light was designed in 3Ds Max. All "appropriated" works were slightly modified in 3Ds Max, Meshmixer and Netfabb.

The train sculpture commission was designed using 3D Studio Max, and then dimensioned in Autocad for the fabricators. The structure was fabricated from steel and concrete titan board. The street pavers were glued on top with top quality epoxy (in a pattern that reflected the local street paving motif). The "wheels" (made out of glued concrete street pavers) were cut by a digitally driven water cutter.

I have worked with 3D digital sculpture, 3D printing, scanning and animation since the early 90’s. I am intrigued by the intersection of virtual and physical sculpture and the juncture of animation and captured video. The content of the art work often focuses on an oblique sense of paranoid apocalyptic fear tempered with a sense of whimsy and irony. Although my media of choice has evolved to a certain degree, I am pursuing interests that are fairly consistent with my last 30 years of practice: eccentric architecture, Kafkaesque dreamscapes, the social and political apocalyptic dimensions of art, indexes of conflict, and whimsical human revelry.

<p>Sorry, but this is instructables, not a gallery. This does not belong here.</p>
<p>Autodesk requires all artists applying for their artist in residence programs to &quot;publish at least one Instructable before the application will be reviewed&quot;. That &quot;publication&quot; I presume includes artwork. </p>
<p>It's also for showing what you've made - many prolific Makers find this site with projects, made but un-documented, so they show what they've done so far as a slide show like this, then produce proper write-ups for the work they do later.</p>
Oh thanks. I'll write up a proper procedure.
<p>Most of the work was made using a Leapfrog Creatr 3D printer. The &quot;insects&quot; were fabricated with 2 - 20 parts &quot;cut&quot; in Netfabb, and &quot;welded&quot; together with acetone/abs slurry, then sanded and painted. </p><p>The classical pieces were made from scans and found models. Some were found for free on the internet (e.g. http://lincoln3dscans.co.uk/), some were bought on-line, and others were scanned myself with Photoscan (as were the architectural images used in my videos). I printed theses sculptures in PLA, in sections (ones that would fit on the Creatr build platform) and then glued the sections together with epoxy and Liquid Nails. I then filled in the cracks with auto and wall filler. I finally painted the sculptures with spray paints. </p><p>The Stalin sculpture with the spot light was designed in 3Ds Max. All works were slightly modified in this 3Ds Max, Meshmixer and Netfabb.</p><p>The train sculpture commission was designed using 3D Studio Max, and Autocad for dimensioning. The &quot;wheels&quot; made out of concrete street pavers were digitally cut on a water cutter. </p>
<p>Hey, welcome to the best site on the internet!</p><p>You work looks really interesting. I hope you'll write up some tutorials to show the processes of how you make your creations sometime. That would be awesome to see!</p>

About This Instructable

649views

1favorite

License:

Bio: I have worked with 3D digital sculpture, 3D printing, scaning and animation since the 90’s. I am intrigued by the intersection of virtual and ... More »
More by brit.bunkley:Kafkaesque 
Add instructable to: