Introduction: Keep Cool in Bed


Almost everyone has experienced the sleepless nights resulting from summer heat waves. Air conditioning may be an answer, personally I dislike a very cold room I just want a cool bed.

Well this is my solution.

Step 1: Cooling Breeze

Many years ago it struck me that what I needed in bed was a cooling breeze that would save me having to lie on top of the bed with the windows wide open.

With that in mind I assembled a simple plywood trunking with a space at the bottom for a small PC fan. The top of the trunking I tucked under the sheets at my feet. Running from a wall wart power supply (12 volts) and a switch by the bed side I was able to turn the cooling breeze on and off as I required.


Unfortunately the old one got dismantled for other projects in the winter - as yet this year hasn't been hot enough to get me making another. BUT

It is very simple a 6 mm thick plywood box shaped like a letter S in a suitable size for the fan you will use  so that the lower part sits on the ground and the upper part sticks over the edge of the bed under the sheets. You will have to select the sizes to suite the height of your bed.

In the lower section a hole has a PC fan, or similar, is mounted in it.

I used an old 12 volt cooling fan because I had it but any fan that can move air will do.

Mounting will depend on what your fan looks like so again you have to design to suite your parts.

My fan was powered by an old wall wart type power supply with a bedside switch to turn on and off as required.

This design idea is so flexible you may be able to find suitable trunking in the kitchen department of your local DIY store.

Step 2: Advanced Models.

In the extremes of summer heat, (not something experienced often in the UK), I found extra cooling was required. To provide this I froze a 2 ltr soda (lemonade)  bottle full of water and put it in the vertical section of the trunking. The air passing this frozen water picked up that extra bit of cool I needed.

Step 3: Result!


The end result is a personalised air conditioned bed, by putting the duct on my side I can even isolate the cooling effect so my dearly beloved doesn't get too cold.

Adding a temperature sensor and automating the control with a Picaxe micro controller was for me a good move although most may find it a step too far.


Comments

author
Schmidty16 (author)2012-06-04

for myself i use an soft ice pack it help alot try it and reply back

author
rickharris (author)Schmidty162012-06-04

:-) I have but find:

a) that it is often too cold
b) there all the time i.e. you can't turn it off
c) needs to be wrapped up or you get condensation

My bed cooler works with or without the ice pack.

AND I note that there is a commercial version out there - Nothing to do with me (unfortunately) just someone with the same idea.

http://www.secure-bedfan.com/

author
Schmidty16 (author)rickharris2012-06-05

ok just wondering if u have tried

author
André B (author)2012-05-13

Great idea.
I definitely gonne try this this summer.
Does it drip ?

author
rickharris (author)André B2012-05-13

Not at all - In fact this MUST be a good design because I noticed recently a commercial version of the same thing 0- not cheap though!!

author
supersoftdrink (author)2011-08-18

Great idea! I'm having trouble figuring out how to make my own. Do you have any pictures of it to help? :)

author

Not at present the old one got dismantled for other projects in the winter - as yet this year hasn't been hot enough to get me making another. BUT

It is very simple a plywood box shaped like a letter S so that the lower part sits on the ground and the upper part sticks over the edge of the bed under the sheets. You will have to select the sizes to suite the height of your bed.

In the lower section a hole has a PC fan is mounted in it.

I used an old 12 volt cooling fan because I had it but any fan that can move air will do. Mounting will depend on what your fan looks like so again you have to design to suite your parts.

My fan was powered by an old wall wart type power supply with a bedside switch to turn on and off as required.

This design idea is so flexible you may be able to find suitable trunking in the kitchen department of your local DIY store.

author
johnny3h (author)rickharris2011-08-21

Hi Rick, To keep the fan, blades, and ducting CLEANER, I suggest a large surface area, and non-restrictive type of air filter at the intake and before the fan.

author
rickharris (author)johnny3h2011-08-21

Good idea - I haven't noticed any serious dust issues but out bedroom floor is wood so on a carpet it may be different.

author
SeamusDubh (author)rickharris2011-08-18

these are the thing you need in the instructable itself.

author
rickharris (author)SeamusDubh2011-08-19

Done - thanks

author
redorchestra (author)2011-08-20

A bit of PVC pipe would work well for this too. Mount a fan on the end of a 90 degree elbow. then up and another 90 degree elbow. I might make two and join them to make a ssquare, so that they will stand. I can have one on my side of the bed and my wife can have one on her side. Good Idea

author
rickharris (author)redorchestra2011-08-20

No problem at all there - If you want to go square you can buy square ducting made for kitchen cooker vents - at least in the UK you can - But anything to duct the air will do.

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Bio: Retired technology teacher - 2 kids, I have an Hons deg in Design and Technology - 28 years as Computer systems engineer Trained as Electronics engineer in ... More »
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