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I found myself rifling through the utensil drawer searching for the tongs when I realized there has to be a better way! I scoured pinterest and the Google and saw some really nice and expensive solutions, so I started thinking about what we had that I could use. you see we are in the process of Neverending renovations so there's lots of bits and bobs hanging about. that's when I started thinking about the copper pipe my boyfriend had removed a few months prior and voila! The kitchen Utensil Rack was born.

Step 1: Materials

what you'll need:

  1. length of old copper pipe to fit your space (32 inches for me)
  2. pipe cutter
  3. sandpaper
  4. S hooks
  5. 2 x gas line standoffs
  6. 2 x copper pipe caps
  7. torch, Flux, solder and damp cloth
  8. 4 x screws and anchors
  9. long level or short level and meter stick

Step 2: Prepare the Pipe

Firstly I had to clean up my pipe, it was pretty gross. I started with a fairly coarse sand paper, I suggest doing this in a well vented area with a mask on if you have it. Not sure that copper dust is the best thing for your lungs.

After the pipe was cleaned up I switched to a steel wool to make the finish look more polished and less brushed. It was much more pretty.

Then using the pipe cutter I cut it to length. For this thing you basically put the cutting wheel where you want to cut your pipe, tighten it down and turn it around the pipe until it gets really easy to turn and isn't cutting any deeper. I then tightened it and turned and tightened and turned until I was all the way through. Next I sanded off any burrs so I wouldn't get a sliver or cut while I was working with the pipe (or you can wear gloves like I should have been doing!)

I couldn't find S-hooks that fit over my pipe so I got the biggest ones I could find then one by one I put them in the vice. Using another piece of pipe I opened one side of the S-hooks a bit, enough so they could slide easily.

Then you can put all the hooks on and the standoffs, you're now ready for the copper pipe caps. Here you can rely on the friction between the pipe and the cap or you can solder the caps on. Mine were pretty tight but I wanted to be sure they were tight enough that if my boyfriend got it all the way to one end and reefed on it thy wouldn't just pop off.

Step 3: Solder on Your Pipe Caps

So I asked my boyfriend to do this step because he has more experience soldering pipes so I figured he'd make it look pretty. He didn't but he has a nice bum so all is not lost. And as long as one side looks good you can sand around and turn the bad side towards the wall.

First we wiped down the ends to make sure there was no debris in there. Then we put some solder on there (I think a brush would have worked better than sticking the pipe in the container but we couldn't find the brush so this worked!).

Next he heated the pipe up enough that the solder would melt and dabbed some solder on all the way around.

After that he used the damp cloth to cool and clean it and we have a winner!

Step 4: Mounting!

First thing I did was hold up the meter stick and level to see roughly where it would go. Then I held up the pipe to mark out where the bracket holes went relative to my level marks.

Thankfully the brackets had vertical slots so I drilled smack in the center of the slots.

I drilled a hole first for my anchor (oh did I mention my stud finder kept saying my studs were moving so I gave up on it and just went for the anchors? I hate stud finders, they only seem to work when pointed at my boyfriend ?).

I then went to screw in my screws for the pipe but as is evidence by my sad face my driver bit was too short ?.

Again I busted out my level to set the rack with my new longer driver bit!

Step 5: Cleanup

This is the part where you put all the tools back where you found them. Sweep/wipe up the drywall from the counters and pick your your prettiest liquor bottles to put on the shelf above your new rack so the junk that was there before doesn't detract from your newest labour of love ?
<p>That turned out looking great! I love the look of the copper and silver hooks! </p>
Thanks! I'm a big fan of the industrial look ?

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