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The Klipsch Quintet 5.0 Home Theater Speakers are great sounding speakers in a small package. However, due to their mounting design, it is difficult to find a speaker stand that will work well with them. The closest model sells for about $50 per speaker. If you want all 4 speakers on stands that adds up quickly. 



Since these speakers are small they would look great with the super slim metal speaker stands. Monoprice has some available as low as $6 per stand! Now that sounds like a good price! I'm going to show you how I modified both the speaker and the speaker stands to use a standard 1/4-20 threaded mount so they would work together. 

Don't worry! everything is reversible if you ever want to use the original pedestals again or if you want to use a different 1/4-20 speaker stand.

Materials
Klipsch Quintet 5.0 speaker system
Monoprice speaker stands (pair) x2
JB weld
Epoxy
Painters tape

Total cost of 4x DIY speaker stands: $40

Step 1: Take Off the Pedestal

This is is the easy part. Grab a set of alen wrenches and unscrew the three screws surrounding the pedistal ball joint on the rear bottom of the speaker. Lossen each of the screws then gradually unscrew them as it may be hard to reach each screw.

When separated you will be left with the speaker and the separate pedestal base. Make sure not to lose the screws or the rubber plug in the bottom of the speaker. 

Repeat this for all 4 speakers.
<p>This step didn't work for me. As I tried to free the bolt from the chrome speaker ball, I had to apply a great deal of force. It wasn't backing out. After applying a great deal of force, something broke free - the glue holding the shaft of the chrome ball. I'm still unable to free the bolt from the shaft. I suspect that between your edition and my edition, Klipsch has glued the bolt into the shaft. And, because the shaft and ball are round, there's nothing against which I can get enough leverage to free the bolt from the shaft. I've gripped the shaft with a crescent wrench, but the bolt will not break free.</p>
Great project, I think I am going to go for it. I do have a couple questions though. <br> <br>Is this the set you bought? : http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=108&amp;cp_id=10828&amp;cs_id=1082819&amp;p_id=3022&amp;seq=1&amp;format=4#feedback <br> <br>Are they sturdy on your hardwood floor? the main complaint I see about these types of stands is that they aren't sturdy and fall over easily. <br> <br>Thanks for the great instructable!
They use some kind of glue or lock tight on the threads of the bolt thats holding the ball stud in place. I used a standard alen wrench to unscrew it. The plastic foot stand should hold the ball stud in place while you turn. If you do not have enough leverage try sliding a small pipe or socket/screwdriver over the alen wrench to give you more leverage. I think I had one that was stuck more than the others and I clamped it in my vice. The rest came out with no issues. See if the others are stuck too.
How were you able to remove the allen screw/bolt for the ball stud on the stand? I just tried removing mine but failing in the process as well as stripping the bolt along with it. <br> <br>Btw.. the movie is The Matrix. Part 1
Love it, I've been looking for stands for my Klipsch speakers for a while now, didn't think of going down this path. <br> <br>BTW my TV is 65&quot; WITH silly 3D and I love it.

About This Instructable

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Bio: I like to take things apart, sometimes they go back together sometimes they end up as something entirely different then where they started.
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