Kristins Teardrop





Introduction: Kristins Teardrop

My name is Brian I am a retired union electrician. I was given a old snowmobile trailer that i had no real use for. So decided to build my daughter a camper.

Step 1: Fixing Trailer

Trailer came with bent tongue, first was to replace that and put new tires on. Had to break down tires twice. I forgot to put in new valve stems.

Step 2: Shape

After getting trailer sanded and painted I used cardboard to figure a shape out.

Step 3: Floor

I decided on a size. Trailer is 8x6 I went 4x8 for compartment. I used 1/2 inch plywood for top and bottom and 2x4s for bracing. I live in upstate N.Y. so insulation will help in cool weather. I sealed edges with metal tape and painted with elastomeric roof paint. I secured the floor to trailer with 8 3/8th in. bolts.

Step 4: Side Walls

For side walls I used 1/2 in. plywood on the outside and 1/4 in. luan plywood for inside walls. I put alot of bracing to try and keep plywood from warping and to use as support. I used a little heavier bracing on the door side. I used foam insulation in side walls.

Step 5: Setting Walls

After getting walls upright I tied them together with 1x2 boards and L brackets. Foam insulation for the roof. I wanted a vent fan so put opening.

Step 6:

Next I slid the Luan into place on the inside and used construction adhesive to adhere it to the cross members.

Step 7: Window

I had a old window out of a pickup truck so I used it. Trimmed with scrap walnut. I had some leftover oak flooring for the floor.

Step 8:

Next I worked on the tailgate area more plywood and bracing. Foam and fiberglass insulation. I had to use 2 pieces of Luan for the roof. Inside area is 4 foot wide so outside walls are 4ft.3in. wide. I tried to get the seam smooth with light body filler.

Step 9: Galley

On the rear I put a spot for stove and a small cupboard. Still thinking if I want more back here. I want to keep it simple. I used scrap butternut,mahogany and walnut for cupboard and most trim.

Step 10: Lift Gate

This gave me some trouble. First attempt didn't work out. I had used bent strips glued together, but they opened up some over the winter so I cut the arch from plywood and sandwiched 3 pieces together. Covered with Luan.

Step 11: Porch

This trailer is wider than most so I decided to put a porch or spot to strap bicycles or what ever on the side. I also put the battery box here.

Step 12: Lighting

Lights and fan from Amazon. I bought what I thought would work. Lot's to choose from. Lights are 12volt LED. Porch side light is switched at light. Door side and double fixture are switched from inside trailer. Single inside light is switched at light. There is a power outlet near the shelf for powering phone or tablet.

Step 13: Jacks

Thought I would try and make some stabilizer jacks. They work ok but need bigger base on the ground. Will weld a pad to the bottom of them. I had to purchase a wheel jack for the tongue.

Step 14: Outside Finish

I used faux wood boards. I got a roll of brown wrapping paper and cut into strips and painted with Sealskin color paint and used a faux wood tool to get the grain. Soaked them in glue and water and pasted them on. I sealed the outside with 4 coats of spar varnish for uv protection and waterproofing.

Step 15: Fun

First trip out camping.



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    I admit that the teardrop shape is cute, but on a practical note I can never grasp the sacrifice of the space imposed by the curved roof compared to what a box trailer would provide on the same frame base (to say nothing of the added difficulties of construction with the curves). I've illustrated this with yellow lines in this picture. (Please, someone, don't say it's more aerodynamic. On trailers this size that really isn't a consideration.) Especially with small trailers, every cubic inch of space is precious with none to waste (in my opinion), especially if you contemplate ever using it to bug out and see you through an emergency..


    The "original" tear drops were designed as a build the yourself camper trailer and there is really only one curve which is not that hard to do. The curve is due to the fact that it is easy to bend ply and made for a more waterproof roof before current materials were available. The lack of space is due to the fact that it is not a full caravan, but a dry bed space to sleep in. Living and cooking is aimed to be outside. The low profile and light weight do make a difference for older and smaller cars - plus IT'S GOT THE LOOK.

    you are correct there is a big loss of space. Were this a work trailer it would matter. When my kids were little I had a chuck wagon I would pull behind the wagoneer for camping. I found all those little compartments were just a place for spiders to collect. Also this trailer has small tires I would worry about cross winds on the highway were it big and square.

    Wonderful build! I have been thinking about building one for quite a while. Maybe some day...

    I've never seen a trailer offset to one side like that... how does it pull on the road with the off-center weight?

    I know it looks one sided but the deck boards on the porch side weigh close to what the compartment weighs. The trailer was for one or two snowmobiles.

    PS. Kristin and I put the hitch and light kit on her Honda Element yesterday. Maiden voyage will be to Sampson State Park. Will let you know how she does.

    ps: I was at that park in 2008... it is surprisingly remote and isolated. Hopefully warm enough to jump off the dock! :-)

    Best wishes! Hope it works out for you.

    PS As in roadworthy, did you need an engineer's certificate, an official inspection or the like?