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Picture of LED Projector Lamp v.1.0
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My first video projector. Ever.

Last year I came across a cheap Toshiba TLP T70M projector on some e-bay wanna-be site over here in Romania. It had no lamp at all but other than that it was operating properly (or so the salesman told me). I traded it for a Shuttle computer I had in my closet and in a few days the projector was delivered. I was surprised that it was in a good condition, I was expecting cracks and scratches, it had none. I turned it on and - predictably - the “lamp missing” LED came on in about two minutes. At this point the projector shuts down automatically. During those two minutes I was able to see the startup screen by looking thru the lenses while holding a small flashlight where the bulb was supposed to be. So yes, it was operating.

I started google-ing all I could find about this projector. I came across the complete Toshiba TLP T70M  user manual (it had none when I received it) and that’s about all. At this point I wasn’t really decided what to do, I was tempted to buy a light bulb for this model and use it as anyone should. On the other hand being horrified by the huge price that projector bulb had it was clear I had to find an alternative light source. Me being a LED addict I started thinking about that. It was the obvious choice but the problem will be the light output. The projector’s lamp had 2000 lumens and in “eco-mode” had 1000 lumens. I was aiming for his lower figure as I won’t be using the projector in daylight anyway. So my goal is 1000 lumens of LED light.

Insert a few weeks of random ideas and pointless calculations here. Lazyness, to be more precise.

 
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matt21century6 months ago

I have your lumen solution.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/10W-20W-30W-50W-100W-High-Power-Great-Bright-LED-Light-Lamp-Chip-Cool-Warm-White/121041709716?rt=nc

I would go with the 50 watt bulb. You will definately want a bigger heat sink too

spiffly9 months ago
I think you're making a mistake with your lumen comparison here. The advertised lumen output for a commercial projector is referring to the final light output from the unit, not the raw lumen output of the bulb, so if you put a 752lm LED into the projector, you'll likely get between 10-30% of that after the light has passed through all the apparatus, much lower than your target of 1000lm.
claudiopolis (author)  spiffly9 months ago
You are right. I learned this the hard way. That's why I stopped developing any projector LED light bulb. DLP projectors are better as those won't take that much of the light output. But with LCD ones, it's a painful experience.
sk8er610 months ago
Hey great instructable. Thanks for covering the issue in fooling the projector to think the lamp is present. I have a Mitsubishi SD205U gathering dust in my closet, so Im going to give this thing a shot. Really awesome write up, clever use of PCB. A more abundant, brighter, and more inexpensive light source can be had with a car headlamp. Someone else had wrote up an 'ible on it, http://www.instructables.com/id/Head-Light-Projector-Mod-V1.2/?ALLSTEPS

Seems like the way to go, reading the comments and the 2.0 write up.
I'm heading out for supplies for this as soon as I get off work!
jduffy541 year ago
If you want some serious firepower, I'd suggest DX's 50W LED, http://dx.com/p/30v-36v-50w-3500lm-led-emitter-metal-plate-white-39872
its $27 and should meet or beat the original lamp.
claudiopolis (author)  jduffy541 year ago
And I'd suggest you reading the v.2.0. instructable.
Focusing LEd array properly is next to impossible. with DIY stuff.
And I have bought a 30W LED from them. Guess what, same problem. Not the light output was the problem but the fact that you can't focus it.
The original lamp can be beaten by LED arrays in lumens output but as a truly focused beam of light nothing else comes close.
Au contraire, it is very easy to make focused lights. You mentioned a reflector, but didn't seem to considder re-using a parabolic one (such as those from lantern flashlights). You also stated that "Lens[es] are useless here because I have 9 separate light sources spread on a 2x2 cm" However, you seemed to ignore that you COULD use a diffuser in front of the leds, and use a compound lens for a reduced focal length (such as http://dx.com/p/20x-magnifier-with-scale-3-led-white-light-4-x-lr927-122569). I can guarantee this method works (even using sanded acrylic as a diffuser) because I've done it (though with a different lens).
Also, most of the projectors I've seen only put light through a small hole (or lens, in your case), so simply putting reflective material like mylar or polished aluminum (you did mention an aluminum reflector in V2) around the LEDs and right up to the hole should give almost no light spill. I dont see how you could have a significant light spill if you just made it to adapt directly to the fresnel lens with reflective, solid material.
claudiopolis (author)  jduffy541 year ago
Ok then, you asked for it.

A high power LED is usually square in shape. Any round parabolic reflector should be cut extensively to have the entire LED array fit properly. Bye-bye focal point, you can not achieve that anymore. The high-power LED arrays, when operating, get very hot, to the point of melting just about any parabolic flashlight reflector you might re-use for that. So you must go for metal ones. Let's not mention the glass option, it's almost impossible to cut properly.

The metal reflector would work but we'd have another problem. It's metal, so if by accident touches the LED array pins you will burn you power supply. Spectacularly, I might add. But let's say that doesn't happen because we leave a gap between the two. Light spills out - a lot. Why? Because you also used a diffuser after the reflector and it's also, very reflective. Compound lens take up space you do not have inside a projector and you loose light with any lens or diffuser you place in front of the LED array.

In my video projector I have 12x6x9 cm to fit the bulb. Anything bigger will stick out of the case. Your proposed setup would be bigger than that. Along with an external power supply or power brick, it'll look ugly. But I'd get over that, if the goal would be reached.

If none of the above seems major problems, let's talk about the final one. Heat. As you know, I presume, LED arrays are to be cooled correctly otherwise they would shift their color temperature and fail quickly. Especially the DX-purchased ones (man, those Chinese have horrible manufacturing quality). The surface of the LED array must not reach 104 degrees Celsius or it will burn itself. This can usually be avoided with big CPU coolers and stuff but the LED array itself is trapped between a parabolic reflector and a diffuser. There's no way to cool that. Heat will build up in there. My projector has a dedicated fan to cool the front of the original bulb. I tried to use it. The reflector got in the way. Without it, massive light spills. Oh, well...

My advice: Get a high-power 150W LED array. Go to a 3D specialist and pay him to come up with a 3D project for a water-cooled metal reflector and cooler, small enough to fit inside the projector case. Go to a manufacturing facility and pay them to make you that 3D part in copper or aluminum. Then fit your LED array inside the reflector, connect the water-cooling hoses, the external power supply and you might get a long lasting LED projector bulb (Provided the DX shop sells you good stuff). Then sum up your bills and come up with your own conclusion. Mine was that it's cheaper to buy original bulbs. And it looks nicer. And I don't have to worry that the power supply I got from DX will burst in flames.


I told you above, I have already done it! Unless someone implanted a false memory in me as well as the person whose projector it was, as well as replacing that lamp with an led lamp as I would have designed. I didn't use a reflector, but did use the others, except the led, for which I used an xm-l. even at a third the power of yours, it was reasonable.
claudiopolis (author)  jduffy541 year ago
Ok then. Let me guess, that was a DLP projector, right? Those have much smaller light losses. Mine is a 3LCD type. Lots of lens and screens for the light to get thru.
callen361 year ago
Not quite a failure, it was very informative. The current LED bulbs in the market have high lumens rating and might be usable here. This article shows how to disassemble a typical LED bulb http://goo.gl/KjF1c
claudiopolis (author)  callen361 year ago
Well thank you very much! I do keep an eye on LED bulbs on the market. What I'm seeing is a rise of LED arrays inside those bulbs. So it's not that LED's actually get brighter. Instead, the high-lumens bulbs feature several LED's. Yesterday I just disassembled one. It started turning on and off repeatedly. I thought one of the capacitors went bad but that wasn't the case. One of the LEDs (there were three in a serial array) started to die (overpowered array, what else could you expect from China). I bypassed that LED and the remaining two are going well for their short remaining life.

Back to projector lamps. Best result - and the only result I'm after - is to use a single light source. You'll be able to use the original bulb reflector and the light will be much better focused. The problem is that a single light source when using LEDs is just not strong enough.
Using LED arrays is not the way to go. I would rather try a xenon lamp instead, those French guys on http://www.allinbox.com/modding.htm are having great results using them. And those lamps are cheap, too.
biolethal3 years ago
found something crazy on ebay... a 100w led. supposedly has about 8000 lumens output.  link
claudiopolis (author)  biolethal3 years ago
Thanks, I saw that one a while ago. Too much heat to get rid of, too much power draw, requiring a beefy power supply. And you don't really need that many lumens anyway. Around 3000 would be enough, I say.
yep. it would be cool though. http://tesladownunder.com/LEDs.htm#100%20W%20LED
claudiopolis (author)  biolethal3 years ago
Actually it would be hot. Real hot. 90W thermal dissipation is way more than a PC processor puts out. Imagine the cooling solution needed. Put that aside, just consider the fact that your projector might just melt due to the intense light beam this 7000 lumens LED puts out. You know, projectors are mainly plastic....
oh. misscommunication... i meant figuratively cool, not physically cool. :) maybe with a temperature switch and variable dimming of the led it might work.
I bought the 100w 8000lm LED chip on ebay. it came with a power supply, lens and reflector for about $60. The heat shouldn't bee too much of a problem. the original bulb was a 100w bulb was just as hot. A heat sink is absolutely needed and do not run it with out the fans of the projector on. So far i have not had a heat issue. the picture is not the brightest but it is 100% better than my previous 2000lm bulb. I will be putting up an instructable of my build soon (by the end of the year).
That sounds awesome!
I have finished the the write up. Here it is:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Convert-A-Projector-To-An-LED-Light-Source/
Looking forward for that one. I envy you. :-)
it all depends on the led, most led's don't give out the UV light. it is mainly the UV light that makes the light beam hot.
this causes a lot of problems in some poorly designed projectors and TV's because the light destroys the panels. if you use a white high power led and it should work fine. leds are considered very efficient.
takeouup2 years ago
how did you get the projector to stop shutting down without the right bulb . how does it know the bulbs is bad , is it volt/watt usage of the bulb or the brightness of the bulb . i tried to use 120v 100w bulb it comes on , lights up , but still says replace bulb and shuts off. any help would be appreciated . thanks for your time.
Most projectors send a logic signal to the main board that tells it that the bulb is either missing or needs to be replaced. Use a multimeter to check the wires that are connected to the board. If there are any labels on the board use those to try to figure out what each wire is for. You will most likely find a wire that is either 5v or 0v when the projector turns on and then switches to the opposite voltage when the "replace bulb" message shows up. How familiar are you with digital logic?
First, I'd try resetting the bulb-hour counter. Some projectors use that as a first layer of protection. Then, as invisiblelight386 wrote, you need to find the wire responsible for shutting down the bulb's power supply. Hook the black lead of your multimeter to a ground point on your board.
With the red probe touch (one by one) the connections of the signal wires. Those are easy to spot as there are 3/4 or five thin wires (or flexible strip) going into the power supply. The power wires are much thicker. Measure the voltage on each wire with the projector on, just before shutting itself down. You'll notice one of them shows 5V before shutting down and as the power supply shuts down, that wire will show 0V. Mark that wire and go find a permanent 5V source on your board (using the same red probe). Usually around the small power regulators. Once you find it, solder a wire there and solder the other end to the wire that goes 0V when shutting down. Having a permanent 5V there tricks the board into believing the projector bulb is on and the boot sequence goes on as normal. Use your 120v bulb to discover you'll hardly see anything on your screen :-). That burnt projector bulb was way stronger than that.
Nice work Claudio...I have bought a dead Sanyo projector with missing bulb. not sure if it was the bulb or other thing. bulb is costly so im afraid 2 buy it then it turns the problem from other reason....feel like wanna rip all the electronics out and turn it into LED projector.....good work buddy
i have found that on 'deal extreme'
http://www.dealextreme.com/p/prime-20w-2000-lumen-led-emitter-metal-plate-white-16-18v-42572
résult
http://www.dealextreme.com/feedbacks/browseCustomerPhotos.dx/sku.42572~id.84204
for 16,61 € or 20,18$ freeshipping
if this can you help....
vistal2 years ago


Lamp Life: UP TO 50,000 hours

Total Watts: 96watts (32 High powered LEDs fused onto a cell Plate)
2,500 Lum
These bulbs are on ebay . Wonder now if i can get info on a conversion for a reg Projector now.:))
arnookie3 years ago
You can now buy led projector bulbs from ebay.
£36.49 + postage from here is the cheapest I found.
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/HD-LED-Projector-EXTRA-REPLACEMENT-SPARE-BULB-LAMP-/150591650632?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item230ff63b48

Copy and past that link and you can see for yourself.
I was going to do the same thing, ie buy a used projector with no bulb and make my own, But I decided to buy one of the cheap Abis projectors off ebay.
I was very supprised how good these cheap projectors are.
But be very carefull. I purchased the Abis HDpro for £200 and it has two hdmi inputs, component, composite input, vga and tv tuner input. It handles 720p fine and 1080p with compression 4.3 to 16.9 aspec ratio in all formats. Some other makes don't have all these features. It saved me a lot of hassle trying to make one work the way you have.

But if you are trying leds I would look at the cheap led projector bulbs off ebay.
Lamp Life: UP TO 50,000 hours Total Watts: 96watts (32 High powered LEDs fused onto a cell Plate) and upto 2,500 lumens.
vistal arnookie2 years ago
Thats Sweet just what i was looking for . I hate the 2000 hours on a reg bulb i wonder if i can convert my norm bulb to this style.
butterninja2 years ago
Hey all. I too am staring on a projector project and I hope to have it done by Christmas. would people be interested in basic and slowly added instructions, or would it be better to upload them in one large batch? let me know if your interested in a full instructable on this. also any suggestions on what lumen bulb to get would be great.
claudiopolis (author)  butterninja2 years ago
I always believed a fully fledged instructable is better than adding stuff as you go. That's why I post so rarely :-). My LED Projector Lamp v.2.0 is stalled right now with no real future. I might post the progress so far, maybe someone can take it from there on.
skaur3 years ago
Congrats Claudiopolis - I know its been over a year now. I wonder how everything is with your son and if any luck has happened with v 2.0?

Thanks!
claudiopolis (author)  skaur3 years ago
Hi skaur, thanks for asking. My son proved to be a much bigger challenge. than we ever anticipated. That's because his medical condition requires almost daily kinetic therapy. So we're back and forth between home and hospital but other than that he's just fine. Hopefuuly he'll be soon in line with the other babies of his age.

As you can imagine v. 2.0 was put on hold and still is. The project is about 50% done but I have troubles focusing the light properly. I may switch to a car xenon bulb setup, it's cheaper and compatible with the shape of the reflector in the original bulb. See www.allinbox.fr for that. Cheers.
bsilva4 years ago
I'm sorry it didn't work out, but it's always useful to see reports of what doesn't quite work.   Sometimes this is more useful education.


Thanks,
Brad
claudiopolis (author)  bsilva4 years ago
Well, I'm not that sorry! I got to see "Avatar" on a projector! :-) For the first time.
Kidding aside, one learns a lot from failures. And I had lots of them :-))  As it is, I wouldn't consider this V.1.0 bulb a failure, it's rather insufficient. Hopefully V.2.0. will be better. I already started working on it but it'll be long before I'll turn that one ON.
Claudiopolis - Any update on v2.0
Dan8v3 years ago
Hi, to all the DIY workers !!!

I am from Argentina and this is my 1st post in this site.

I working in 2 projectors ( Infocus LP350 and X1 ) trying to make the mod of the allinbox.com website.

They use a 150W HQI lamp and usually the mods are with 4000 / 4200ºK color temperature lamp.

All is going OK with this mods but there are many coments about a tiny low luminosity.

I am ready to mount the lamps and I have the option of the 150W HQI in 4200, 5200 and 6500ºK in the store.

I think that the better option should be the 5200ºK because 6500ºK is a near "blue" light like xenon lamps.

Did anybody here tried this mod and have an opinion about this values ?

Thanks in advance. Daniel.
mrworf3 years ago
http://www.instructables.com/id/Fooling-LCD-Projector-install-any-lightbulb/

About fooling projector check here!!!
frollard3 years ago
Greetings! Great ible! I'm about to embark on the same journey for my optoma hd806 projector :)

The bulb is about 1/4 done its life cycle but starting to flicker, so I want to be ready for it. My plan is to use a 3-5000 lumen 100 watt led, but the light source is 180 degree and need to come up with optics that condense that beam to cram it into the dlp light port. I can't wait to see part 2!

Congrats on the baby!
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