Step 1: Materials!

Tools needed:
-X-acto Knife
-Steak Knife
-Measuring Tape

-2" and 8" round containers/bowls (for eyes, mouth and hole for head)
-Large boxes
-12" Cement form tube (found near construction materials)
-3/4" Styrofoam Insulation (found near fiberglass insulation) *
-2-3 cans of Yellow spray paint * (Krylon's Sun Yellow is a very close match to LEGO yellow)
-2-3 cans of red/blue/green/other spray paint (color of body, your choice)
-Sandpaper (400ish grit)
-A sheet of copy paper
-High-density foam
-Spray glue (preferred over hot glue because of styrofoam)
-Packing tape
-Gorilla glue
-Speaker fabric or black panty hose (So you see out of but others cannot see in)
-A strip of Velcro (the hook side)
-Yellow Kitchen gloves
-Long sleeve shirt (matching to body color)

*Here's the deal about spray paint and styrofoam. Spray paint cans contain an aerosol that loves styrofoam and dissolves it on contact. I will explain how I overcame this and improve the durability of the head in a later step.
<p>These are AWESOME!!! I'd be willing to buy a couples Lego costume if anyone is looking to sell theirs?! Had the idea of Emmett and Kragle but I love these! Please let me know!</p>
<p>Amazing costume! I'm working on a Lego Movie Wyldstyle Halloween Costume. I've been following your instructions. Any ideas on how to create the hair? I would greatly appreciate it! Thanks.</p>
<p>Thank you! The hair would be tricky but I have an idea. The foam you use inside the head can be re-purposed for the hair. It would take some time to trim to shape but you can use a combination of wire to push the foam together and glue to hold it. Shape it to the Lego head so it can slip around it like the normal mini figs do.</p><p>Painting it is another matter. I think the best way to do it is use either Plasti-dip or Flex-seal. Both are rubberized spray-on cans you can apply to various objects. A few coats of this should cover up the foam's cells enough to leave a smooth finish so you can paint the blue and pink streaks in the hair.</p><p>You'll want to keep it lightweight but strong enough for the occasional run in with a wall or person. Also keep the top breathable by cutting a hole in it and lining the top of it with some spare speaker fabric. </p><p>You have plenty of time to work on it, so take your time. Best of Luck!</p>
<p>I forgot to post my end results. Thanks so much for the instructions! They helped a lot. Our costumes were a hit!</p>
<p>How did you do the hair on yours??</p>
<p>Great tips! I'll have to look for the foam. Haven't purchased it yet. Thanks!</p>
I used vinyl material and fabric stiffeners for the hair.
<p>I'm thinking about using art wire mesh to form a template, and then covering it with plaster cloth. We'll see - good luck!</p>
Good idea! I read a blog where someone created a cosplay wig in a similar way.
<p>HI there, i want to thank you VERY much for the instructions that you put on here.. they were exactly what i needed to put my costume together. I went the Ninjago route as its my son's favorite. I pulled off a Sensei Wu costume.. Your instructions for the head were fantastic! What do you think? </p>
<p>how did you make tha hands and beard ?</p>
<p>Hi guys, here's my Lego Spaceman costume I completed last weekend for a Space theme Fancy Dress party. Any construction questions, ask away!</p>
<p>Thanks for the instructable! I used it to make the head for my boyfriend, and he made his shirt piece, he was Benny the Spaceman from the movie, and I was the angry Unikitty!<br><br>For my head, I nested four pieces of the concrete form, three for the helmet, and one for the face. I covered my foam with wood filler, and a last layer of wood glue before painting, it worked great! Although, this design doesn't have a vent on top, so it might get toasty.</p>
<p>I couldn't help it, here are some in-process shots of the boyfriend's helmet / head:<br><br></p>
<p>I gathered some more photos of my construction. We did a few things differently, and I may actually write my own instructable to show more details. But your instructions were vital to the success of my own project, so thank you!</p><p>We didn't use tape to secure the foam to the forming tube, we used paper-mache on the inside, strips of newspaper soaked in glue which worked pretty well to secure them. We also used a lot of spackle to smooth everything as best we could. We painted with an acrylic base coat before using the spray paint.</p><p>I was SO lucky in that I found two concrete forming tubes, one inside the other, which meant that the larger one could become my space helmet. So definitely check out those forming tubes as they are not all the same as one may think!</p><p>I decided not to do the body, or try to make legs, as I wanted to be able to move, sit, dance etc as much as possible. So just found lots of blue clothes.</p><p>The hands were made using Thomas Willeford's fleather material: two sheets of craft foam stuck together with double-sided duct tape. A thick bendable wire was sandwiched in-between those foam sheets to allow the &quot;claws&quot; to be bent into the right shape. I attached the claws to two simple fleather bracers (held together with velcro) using 4 snaps. This allowed me to take my hands off when needed.</p><p>I used two overlapping pieces of hosiery for the mouth, so I could poke a straw through and still have a beer :)</p>
<p>Nice! I also made the space man head for my boyfriend! I wanted to do a removable helmet, but was afraid time would not permit, so I nested three pieces of concrete form by cutting a vertical section out of the inner two to make the helmet, then i inserted a fourth to serve as the face. I love all of your details like the jetpack and hands, and the mouth hole for drinking!</p>
<p>My shoulders are too broad to taper the box that I had, but I manager to still win the work costume contest. Thanks for the instructable. I couldn't have figured out the head without it.</p>
We tried something similar for this year.
<p>sweet instructable! I spent probably three plus full hours on making the head. I made it out of a bucket and just used styrofoam for the bottom curve. Bucket is cheap, light and pretty decent working material. Hard to cut details though. The plastic cracked a bit when i tried to cut it and my eyes aren't perfectly round but oh well! I just sanded it quickly and the spray paint stuck great! Two coats and you couldn't see through to the original color. I covered the bottom foam with duct tape and scratched that up with the sand paper before painting it. Painted didn't adhere quite as well. There's also a bit of gorilla glue holding the bottom to the bucket and also the nub (hidden in picture) to the top. </p><p>For the body i just did one angle piece of cardboard in front, hung from my neck from a big stretchy rubber band i had. A string would work fine too, probably. Other than that, lots of tin foil, cardboard, duct tape and spray paint plus some time making a cardboard stencil. I spent a lot of time on decorating the body. Lots of drawing, cutting, spraying, sticking tin foil, etc. and you gotta make sure to do it all in the right order. Crown is from cardboard and tinfoil. Dishwashing gloves and a shirt to match the spray color makes you a Lego King! Sword to come tomorrow! Probz just more cardboard tinfoil and tape for that...</p><p>Extra materials i used,</p><p>Sharpie</p><p>Tin foil</p><p>Rubber band</p><p>Wine</p><p>A long and fun process, best accompanied by red wine, cheap beer and a grilled cheese with soup. Also it's helpful if you have other people around to shoot ideas off and to generally sooth your soul when your frustrated. Mega props if they also cook delicious homemade soup.</p>
<p>Won 1st Prize at the church costume party! Thanks for the idea!</p>
<p>Any advice on how to put the body together? Did you simply tape the sides? </p>
Thank you for this great instructable! I just finished my 80s Lego Spaceman based on this tutorial!!! Here's a photo on Instagram: http://instagram.com/p/umoZkljsAo/
<p>Love this! My boyfriend really wanted to be the spaceman. I'll have to show him for next year. Wow! </p>
Far out man!
<p>Thank you for the directions! It took longer than we thought but was well worth it and everyone loved it!</p><p><strong>Helpful Note: </strong>We actually used a foam we purchased at Home Depot (the purple stuff in the photo) thats paintable which made things easier so that we didn't have to tape the whole thing or prime it. We bought 4 of them to have enough for all the parts. My boyfriend made my eyelashes and lips out of construction paper and I just glued it on. I would have loved to do hair but ran out of time. We also won at the costume party, one party down and one more to go. Thanks again!</p>
<p>Great to hear there's another type of foam out there with paint-able properties. I might have to add it to the instructable for others to look out for. Thanks for the suggestion!</p>
<p>I found the link! I think its a few $ more than the other insulation or maybe the same. You need 4 pieces of it for everything. <a href="http://www.homedepot.com/p/Project-Panels-2-ft-x-2-ft-Project-Panel-PP1/203553730?N=5yc1vZbaxx" rel="nofollow">http://www.homedepot.com/p/Project-Panels-2-ft-x-2-ft-Project-Panel-PP1/203553730?N=5yc1vZbaxx</a></p>
<p>Thanks for the brilliant instructions on this one. Made it on Saturday over the course of the day and wore it out that night. Still didn't get to smooth it out as much as I'd have liked, body shape is square rather than angled, but I think it turned out well anyway.</p>
You did a great job in such a short amount of time! What's really great about the Lego Mini Figuring is that they are so recognizable. Even if you're strapped for time, you can pull something off that everyone can relate too.
Made one as Emmet and Lord Business from the Lego Movie with a friend for Dragon Con this year. We were such a hit we had a line of people wanting to take pictures with us. <br><br>This is a great Instructable. We ended up priming the whole head with some standard wall primer to solve the spray paint Styrofoam issue then sanded it to try and smooth it. Added a 6 inch computer fan to the top of the heads and a 9v battery to keep us cool through the day. If you add a fan make sure it blows out as we found that kept us the coolest.
<p>What did you use to make the hair for Lord Business? Do you have pictures of the back of his head?</p>
His hair was also made of Styrofoam. This one I don't really have any pictures of as it was the second one I did. I also unfortunately no longer have it as my friend took it home with him. It was a bit tricky, so I will do the best I can to explain. I've also attached a diagram. You have to first cut the bottom of his hair. It's the shape of a partial octagon. What I did was cut the octagon shape then put the tube over the foam to cut the arch on the inside. Glue this to base to the outside of the head first. Then glue the sides onto the base. Found it easiest to tape the sides of all the sides together then glue to the base using the tape as a sort of hinge. Using the tape as a backing you can further glue the vertical seems for a stronger hold and to smooth them out. Glue on the top and then 2 layers of styrofoam for the mohawk part. Then glue on the front side burns and mohawk forehead part. Once it all dries drill a hole on the top for the fan. Did the same in using wall primer to cover everything before spray painting. <br><br>Hope this helps. I'll have to make sure to take more pictures and setup a second instructable next time :)
<p>Awesome. Thanks for the picture and the diagram. Appreciated.</p>
Was able to locate 1 photo of it all glued and drying. The painters tape was used to apply pressure while it was drying since it didn't rip up the styrofoam when you took it off.
<p>What did you use for Emmit's construction hat? Or did you buy it?</p>
I actually made it out of Styrofoam. I unfortunately did not take as many pictures of this part as I should have but I've attached the one that I do have. <br><br>Directions:<br>I used a styrofoam wreath and half dome glued together. Then cut thin arches out of some of the scrap styrofoam board left from making the bottom part of the head. Glued those onto the dome to create the ridges. Then used sand paper to roughly round the styrofoam ridges. Next I used spackling to finish smoothing out the ridges. Then glue to the top of the concrete tube. Once it was all dry I used the standard wall primer to coat the styrofoam before sanding and spray painting the final color. <br><br>Wreath: http://www.michaels.com/styrofoam-floral-wreath-flat-white/10531079.html#q=styrofoam&amp;start=21 (make sure the diameter matches the concrete tube)<br>Half Dome: http://www.michaels.com/floracraft-dry-foam-half-ball/10355246.html#q=half+ball&amp;start=3 (not exactly what I used, couldn't find it online. I found a standard white styrofoam dome the exact same diameter as the wreath at my local store)
<p>thank you for that. I found a 2 gallon bowl that is about right, and am going to glue down some roping for the ridges. Wont be as good as yours, but not sure I have the time for more styrofoam sanding ...</p><p>thank you for the reply</p>
<p>OK so here is how mine turned out. Thought I had the styrofoam well sanded but came out a bit rough in the end (I also uses foam wreath rings so I didnt have to cut that much, maybe that was it). Helmet I found a plastic planter that was ... well ... for me close enough!</p><p>Thanks to all!</p>
<p>Forgot to attach image</p>
<p>I'm wondering the same thing.</p>
<p>I have yet to see the Lego Movie but it appears like I need to. Great expressions! I knew adding a fan would help, I'm glad it worked well for you!</p>
Thanks so much for your creativity... it allowed me to appear to be creative... I made 1 and then my other 2 kids wanted them too... The girl hair comes off just like a real lego... and I used yellow beer koosies for the hands... They were a big hit!!!! Again... Nice instructions!!!! Great Job!!!!
<p>Beer coozies are a GREAT idea for the hands! That's easier than molding them out of cardboard and foam (which I doubt I'm going to have the patience for after making the head). Now I've just got to find some FAST.</p>
<p>Would you be interested in selling your Lego costumes? </p>
They look fantastic! Thank you for the kind words, it makes me happy every time this instructable makes someones' night memorable!
Hm...I just came up with a thought. Instead of using tape, how about paper mache? I think that would be easier to paint and come out with a smoother look.
<p>Using paper machete is a fantastic idea, for all or part of the head. It takes a while to dry, and if you are going to wear the costume, make sure you're not using water soluble glue, or your body sweat will break it down quickly and cause the paint to run. You can treat the paper machete costume afterwards, or use glue that is waterproof. Google waterproof paper machete. http://www.ultimatepapermache.com/waterproofing-papier-mache </p>
Good idea. Never thought about using paper mache. You could smooth out the entire head for an even finish.
what do you think of using the egg crate foamy material for inside the head? i'm getting materials together this week for my son's costume!
Egg crate foam would be a great replacement to the foam I used. Would help with ventilation too!

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Bio: I'm just a guy that loves to make things. Art, electronics, crafts, woodwork etc. You name it, I've probably at least tried it ... More »
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