LVD

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Introduction: LVD

This chair is designed to enable deaf people to enjoy music. It can do this by using the speakers I modified in to transucers. This way deaf people can hear with their tactile organs instead of their ears.
People who aren't deaf can experience the music through the symbioses of both senses

Step 1: Welding the Frame

Step one is to weld the frame that will hold the spine, seat and armsrests

Step 2: Armrests

Here you can see the holders of the armrests mounted in place.

Step 3: Spine

Then you bend the spine, wich consists of two 4mm thick metal bars, and attach it to the folding mechanism of a car seat

Step 4: Bending the Wood

Here is my woodboiler, that I used to bend the backframe, the armrests and the curves of the sitting element, on this MDF mold, that has armoring rods (for concrete) as spacers

Step 5: Wood in Place

The wood is bent into the armrest, seat and back

Step 6: Seat

I tried to find the ideal sitting curves so I just used my bum as a mold, with Poly urethane foam, aluminium and finished it with polyester.

the bottom of the seating compartiment ( last photo) has the sliding rails of a car under it.

Step 7: Transducers

I tried several designs for the transducers, to maximize the freqeuncy range.



Step 8: Finishing

Connecting a velleman kit to 3 pairs of light bulbs (UV colour-coded) through opto-switches so the audio source can be monitored visually as well.

Hooking all the speakers up to three 4-channel amps and you are off to go.

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    25 Comments

    are those... waterballons in bags?

    you should make this a product for the average store

    My wife, once a passionate classical music lover and Sonny Terry-Brownie McGhee fan, slowly lost her hearing... 95-110 dB gone, over several years... and she has been despondent about the loss. I am going to build this, my first big project, to give her back some of the music. I have no idea how to vote or anything similar, but be assured, there is a personal and compelling fan of your work out here, in Netland. Thank you.

    have you finished it, and how much did it cost
    I thought it may be good for kids with parents who cant stand loud music

    Great project and very nice craftsmanship. I've only seen wooden steam boxes. Would it be possible to get more information on the pipe boiler?

    it's actually a really straight forward design, it is a long pipe, about 3.5m long in thick steel wich has a hole for a manometer in it, wich I would really recommend to put in, and then the second part is the outlet, wich is a boll-tap (If you call it that way), a larger kind of on-off tap. Originally I tried putting the two together with ski bindings, but I wanted to be sure so I used screws (becouse it goes up to 10 x atmospheric pressure) normally you should put a seal in between the tap and the boiler itself, wich I originally did, but it can't stand opening and closing that well; it has about a 30 open-close cycle life span. it's not that expensive (about 5 dollar) but ity's cheaper to do it with modeling foam cardboard and it works just as good (Kappa and Bristol kind) It takes about an hour and a half from inserting the wood to full fibre saturation(ready wood) of course all depending on the kind/thickness of your wood and the temperature of the fire. To see the boiler in action, I added a video I made about a steamer and the boiler

    100_0660.JPG100_1078.JPG

    I dunno if this would work, but when I worked in a pipeshop cleaning and pressure testing drilling pipes. They were often tested to very high pressures, and the pipes themselves are fairly wide, thus allowing more room for more wood. One length of pipe could give you several of these wood steamers. ~adamvan2000

    Many thanks for the response. I've been interested in steam bending for a few years. I was thinking of building a wooden steam box. I like your version much better. It will be one of my next projects. May have to wait for cold weather though.

    That was the video I featured in my article a few weeks ago! Awesome! :D