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Keep your lens cap's from getting lost all over the shop with this clever Lego and Sugru hack. And if you don't have Sugru you could always use Araldite for extra strength and resilience to tough camera abuse. I did both and I've got to say I'd trust the Araldite a lot more.

What you need:

  • Camera lens cap
  • Camera strap
  • Sugru
  • Flat lego pieces
  • Araldite

Step 1: Attaching the Lego to the Lens Cap

Spread a blob of Sugru on to your lens cap about the rough size of your Lego piece with the bricks bump face upwards (make sure you don't put it in the way of the clasping mechanism).

Fill the underside of the flat Lego piece with Sugru and then push it brick side up on to the lens cap Sugru mound, pressing the two pieces together but be careful not to apply too much force as the Lego pieces could cut through the Sugru rather than adhere to it.

Step 2: Attaching the Flat Lego to the Camera Strap

Smear a tiny piece of your Sugru on to your fabric camera strap and build up layer upon layer to give the Sugru strength against the flexible material, then push the Lego flat face side down in to the Sugru mound until it adheres.

Step 3: Let It Cure

Sugru is only pliable for thirty minutes after the packet has been opened so you should work fast and find a side project to use the rest of your Sugru on after you've finished this project. Sugru needs 24 hours to dry fully and to form the all important bond we need to keep the Lego securely in place.

Of course you could use your spare Sugru on turning everything and anything in to a lens cap port; your camera bag strap, a belt, a boot, whatever you use to go snapping your pictures you can paste Sugru on it and make it a Lens Cap safehouse. Also you could put Lego Flat's on each of your Len's caps.

Once your Sugru is dry you're good to go. You can also do this tutorial by replacing the Sugru with Araldite for extra strength and use whatever Lego pieces you like to snaz it up a bit.

<p>You are fxxxxx genius! thanks </p>
<p>Brilliant!</p>
I made it and used sugru too. I had no problem whatsoever with it holding on to the cap and the fabric of the strap. <br>I walked around with it for 3 days at the EXPO in Milano and even if I didn't trust it fully at the beginning it worked just fine. So thanks for the instruction.
<p>This is great, thank you. </p>
you are a jenus , you save me ; simple but amazing and usefull !
WHAT IS IT THOUGH? A LENSE CAP HERO OR A LENSE CAP SAVER. MAKE UP YOUR MIND!<br><br>jokes aside though nice instructable I pushed two Legos together on either side of my pocket (one on either side of the fabric) and then put the cap on the outside one. that works better for me than having the cap on my strap.
<p>I see what you mean, great for if the material you are wearing is thin. Simplicity is often best. </p>
<p>I think this is a good idea but Velcro is much less bulky, is easy to apply and makes a secure attachment.</p><p>Only a small piece of hook and of loop is necessary.</p>
<p>This is a great idea! I would probably use epoxy for the bond because I don't really trust Sugru... </p><p>How is your experience ? Does the Sugru perform well on the plastic to plastic and the plastic to leather joint ?</p>
Sugru wasn't really a good fit with the fabric despite the packet saying it 'works on most fabrics' but it worked alright on the plastic. Another user, Omnivent, suggested using nylon string to attach the lego piece to the fabric which was a great idea. <br><br>I would definitely just use some strong plastic glue like epoxy or araldite to stick the lego to the lens cap though.
<p>I generally would never trust the glueing part, but the idea of exploiting the LEGO mechanism is great!</p><p>:-)</p>
<p>I was going to use it to keep my gloves together, because somehow I always end up losing one. </p>
<p>Also a great idea!</p><p>:-)</p><p>I used to play with LEGO about 3 or 4 decades ago and those single items mechanically sticked together really very strong, I hope it still has the same productquality.</p><p>But I think the problem could be attaching them to very different materials.</p><p>For something made of cloth, just like gloves for example I would try to make some tiny holes right between the nipple-pins or actually within those inner circles of the upper part ... and stitch them....just considering ...</p><p>:-)</p>
Is the grey object a sort of glue???what is that???
<p>It's called Sugru it's the 'worlds first mouldable glue that turns in to rubber', it's super versatile and great for fixing things up. </p><p>Here's the link for the site: <a href="https://sugru.com/about" rel="nofollow">https://sugru.com/about</a></p><p>If you sign up to their newsletter you get 10% off because Sugru is kind of expensive for what it is. You can probably find a tutorial online to make your own Sugru; much cheaper alternative. </p>
<p style="color: black;">Not bad, but I've used magnets for this purpose for years, very out-of-sight. I back it up with a thin woven nylon string (black) and this would work for you as well, in case the LEGOs break apart - at least when you keep the cap on the camera strap :)</p><p style="color: black;">Have a nice day.</p>
<p>The string idea is a good one, I'll definitely use it to fortify the camera strap part. Cheers :D</p>
<p>Great idea! Checkout my camera project at: https://www.instructables.com/id/Versatile-GoPro-Clip/</p>
That is genius. Thanks for sharing the idea.
<p>Brilliant! I'm not even a photographer and I love this idea!!!</p>
<p>Nice life hack</p>
<p>I'm kicking myself for not thinking of this sooner... Thank you for that.<br><br>Time to go get the needed parts :D</p>

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