Introduction: Lights for an Electrical Bike

Picture of Lights for an Electrical Bike

This project was originally created for an electrical bike, it can be used for other things though. It is a basic headlight and turning signals. We created this in the Designed World Class taught by Jason Cox at Dublin School in the fall of 2016.

Step 1: Headlights: Materials

Picture of Headlights: Materials

Wires

12 Anderson Connecters

2 10W LEDs

2 10W Resistor

Banana Plugs

Heat Shrinks

Switch

Quadcopter Power Distribution Board

2 Heat Sinks

Solder

__________

Battery (with anderson connectors)

Step 2: Headlights: Lights

Picture of Headlights: Lights

Take the heat sinks and attach them to the back of the LED lights. Then solder the positive side of the wire to the positive side of the light. Then solder the negative side of the wire to the negative side of the light. Put heat shrink over the exposed wire. Attach anderson connectors to the other ends of the wire.

  • Test the lights using a battery (with a anderson connector) before going on the make sure that the lights work.

Step 3: Headlights: 3D Printed Parabolic Reflector

Picture of Headlights: 3D Printed Parabolic Reflector

A parabolic reflector will focus all the light in one area. According to solarfact.com, "The parabola is special type of curve that has a focal point to which parallel beams of light will be reflected. The opposite is also true, a light source placed at the focus will create a parallel beam of light, as in a spotlight." (Picture is also from solarfact.com)

Step 4: Headlights: Switch

Picture of Headlights: Switch

Take the switch and see which sides are connected to each other using a multimeter. Then take a wire and cut the positive wire in half in the middle. Then solder the positive wire to the connected sides of the switch. Put heat shrink over the exposed wire. Put anderson connectors on the other end.

Step 5: Headlights: Resistor

Picture of Headlights: Resistor

Take a wire, cut the positive wire in half and solder two 10W resistors in between the wires. Take electrical tape and head shrink to cover the exposed wire and resistor. Attach an anderson connector to one side and banana plugs to the other.

Step 6: Headlights: Quadcopter Power Distribution Board

Picture of Headlights: Quadcopter Power Distribution Board

Take the wires with the resistor, and the banana plugs and attach them to a quadcopter power distribution board. Plug everything in in the order that it was created (lights, switch, resistor, and distribution board) and add a battery on the other side of the board. Test that this works by flipping the switch. If the lights turn on and off, SUCCESS!! If not, review the earlier steps.

Step 7: Turning Signals: Materials

Picture of Turning Signals: Materials

Materials:

  • Adruino Board
  • Arduino Program
  • Arduino Connector Cord
  • Wire
  • 4 10W LEDs
  • Anderson Connectors
  • Heat Sinks
  • Heat Shrinks
  • Relay Module
  • M-F Jumpers

Step 8: Turning Signals: Lights

Picture of Turning Signals: Lights

Take the heat sinks and attach them to the back of the LED lights. Then solder the positive side of the wire to the positive side of the light. Then solder the negative side of the wire to the negative side of the light. Put heat shrink over the exposed wire. Attach anderson connectors to the other ends of the wire.

Test the lights using a battery (with a anderson connector) before going on the make sure that the lights work.

Step 9: Turning Signals: Relay Module

Picture of Turning Signals: Relay Module

Take the lights and split the negative side from the positive side. Cut the positive side in the middle, and screw it into the relay board. Put the opposite positive side and put it in the connected hole on the relay board. Just leave the negative side out and put them all together in an Anderson connect. Do the same with the free positive sides.

Step 10: Turning Signals: Arduino

Picture of Turning Signals: Arduino

Use the program in the step below. Upload it to the board. Use the hookup wire to connect GND with GND, IN1 with -11, IN2 with -10, IN3 with -9, IN4 with -8, VOC with 5V.

Step 11: Turning Signals: Arduino Program

Picture of Turning Signals: Arduino Program

int switchr = 12,
switchl = 13; int light1 = 11, light2 = 10, light3 = 9, light4 = 8;

// the setup function runs once when you press reset or power the board void setup() { // initialize digital pin LED_BILTIN as an output. pinMode(light1, OUTPUT); pinMode(light2, OUTPUT); pinMode(light3, OUTPUT); pinMode(light4, OUTPUT); pinMode(switchr, INPUT_PULLUP); pinMode(switchl, INPUT_PULLUP); digitalWrite(light1, HIGH); digitalWrite(light2, HIGH); digitalWrite(light3, HIGH); digitalWrite(light4, HIGH); } void blinker(int lightNumber) { digitalWrite(lightNumber, LOW); //digitalWrite(lightNumber2, LOW); // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level) delay(500); // wait for a second digitalWrite(lightNumber, HIGH); //digitalWrite(lightNumber2, HIGH); // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW delay(500); }

void blinker2(int lightNumber, int lightNumber2) { digitalWrite(lightNumber, LOW); digitalWrite(lightNumber2, LOW); // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level) delay(500); // wait for a second digitalWrite(lightNumber, HIGH); digitalWrite(lightNumber2, HIGH); // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW delay(500); }

// the loop function runs over and over again forever void loop() { if(digitalRead(switchl) == LOW) blinker2(light1, light2); if(digitalRead(switchr) == LOW) blinker2(light3, light4); // wait for a second }

Comments

macho_manrandysavage (author)2016-10-26

Instructions unclear: Hand soldered, quadcopter stuck in motorcycle

Swansong (author)2016-10-25

Cool idea :) I used to have a little generator run by my back wheel that would power my bike lights.

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