Instructables

FlashBack - Backpack, Camelbak or Jersey Integrated LED Bike Flashers

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Picture of FlashBack - Backpack, Camelbak or Jersey Integrated LED Bike Flashers
I often ride bikes that end up not having working LED flashers, either because it's a friends bike who doesn't believe in safety, mountain bike, or the batteries are dead again. Since I always bring my camelbak with me on rides, I designed some LED flashers that are integrated into the bag.

Some of the advantages that I have found to this system are:
- The lights are higher up, for better visibility then flashers attached below the seat.
- Waterproof. I've thrown the whole bag in the washing machine with the flashers attached.
- Flash timing between the 2 flashers is out of sync, creating an eye catching beat frequency strobing pattern.
- Single 2AA power source.
- Angle provides excellent side and rear visibility.
- They're always there when I need them.
- Don't need to buy separate flashers for each bike, if you have more then one.
- Could be sewn on to a bike jersey.
- You can blind the biker behind you.

Check it out at:
www.engineerable.com/flashback


 
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Step 1: Materials

Materials:

- The LED flashers were purchased on sale at Electronics Goldmine for $1.50. The housing turned out to be the worst cheap plastic, and the lens barely held on. However, the LED's were some of the brightest I had seen. They are actually daytime viewable. I didn't purchase these for this project, but since the LED's were so bright, and the board was tiny, they were perfect. They have so far survived 2 years of abuse and machine washing.
http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G15411

- Scrap Polycarbonate - the approximate thickness I used measures 3/32 (probably sold as 1/8in) and 7/32 (probably sold as 1/4 in)

- Wires - 6 approximately 6 inch small gauge wires

- One small switch. I used a smt click switch.

- 5 minutes epoxy

- Strong thread to sew the flashers onto the bag. Preferably an industrial grade thread, like something used to sew leather.
sgomes33 years ago
Thank you very much for this Instrucables. Absolutely brilliant. I have used a modified version of this in one of my instrucables. You can view it here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Voltage-Regulated-5-V-Bicycle-Dynamo-Light-USB/

I will probably hook it up to my panniers. The taillight is very visible and cool indeed. Thanks for sharing this idea. Regards,
Sonnet.
Very nicely done. 5/5.
Congrats on being featured on the MAKE: Blog too!
engineerable (author)  Handsome-Ryan6 years ago
Thanks, I have much more interesting stuff on the way.
 Great! Can't wait to see it!
chotzeny6 years ago
Great Job. wish I saw this last night. i had to change the LED's from my cheap flasher. they were suppose to be white, turned out to be yellow :( So i had a dodgi (not so cheap) head light that always stopped responding. know the Cheapo is working white. I will put it on my Baby carrige as a flash light...
Mr. Rig It6 years ago
I have to say again I really like this project. This is a favorite mine and congratulations on winning the contest! GOOD JOB!
engineerable (author)  Mr. Rig It6 years ago
Thanks, that's very cool! I didn't expect to win anything. I still have a video clip of it in action that I need to post.
leebryuk6 years ago
Nice job. It's a very good idea.
comodore6 years ago
Great instructable!!! I have added you Instructable to my MYTHBUSTERS group! rate:*****
santy226 years ago
Damm nice
Lego man6 years ago
Nice Instructable!
Mr. Rig It6 years ago
Cool! This give me all kinds of ideas. Just to let you know giving me ideas can be a dangerous thing. This is not only a cool project you made it look professional, KUDOS!