MY CROSS-CUT JIG AKA a SLED

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Introduction: MY CROSS-CUT JIG AKA a SLED

About: 1945 was a very good year. No, not for wine ... for me. I was born. Yes, I'm old, Father William, but brillig, and my slithy toves still gyre and gimble in the wabe. Yes, I had a pet dinosaur. His name was...

A jig is a device that holds and guides a piece of work. This jig is also called a sled.

Step 1: I HAVE a SMALL ONE

Admittedly, it's not something a DIYer likes to talk about, but I have a small table saw. I wanted to build a cross-cut sled for it to be used on a project I had planned. I know, it's obvious I have table saw envy. Forgive me my short comings.

Step 2: IT'S ALL ABOUT THE BASE

I found an unused shelf to use as the base of the sled.

Step 3: MY TABLE SAW IS SO SMALL....

HOW SMALL IS IT?

The slots for the runners wouldn't even fit a penny. I had to use small washers. I trimmed 1/4" wood down to the exact width of the two tracks on the table saw to act as runners for the base. The washers kept the runners just above the table surface. One runner went in each track and glue was spread on each. The base was then set on top.

Step 4: SEE THE TWO RUNNERS?

I weighed it down with a box of wood until the glue set. Then flipped it over to check it out. I will add screws to secure the runners.

Step 5: THE FRONT SUPPORT

I found a piece of ripped 2 x 4 once used as a cutting board. I screwed it in place.

Step 6: FIRST CUT

I ran the saw and cut into the base. Now you see what that front support was for. To hold the base together.

Step 7: PUSH SUPPORT

I found a piece of what I was going to use for a leg for a project that I never completed. I put one pivot screw in it and squared it to the blade. Then added the other screw. The whole purpose of this jig is to make perfectly accurate square cuts.

Step 8: CONFIRMING a SQUARE CUT

There are several methods for assuring a square cut. 3-4-5 method, 5 cut method, reciprocal method, or simply holding a square against it, which is what I did. Once I was assured I had a perfectly functioning jig I secured the support.

Step 9: SAFETY FIRST

Since I would be pushing the sled into the blade I added a little memory block which would remind me to keep my hands away from that area, not that I would ever have to fully push the sled all the way through.

Step 10: I WAXED MY JIG

Waxing the bottom of the jig and its runners helps with sliding. I made that wooden mallet in 2013. Yes, I date and sign my work.

Step 11: I TESTED THE JIG

And I was very satisfied with the results. I'm able to clamp a stop on the front support push bar. That'll make for accurate cutting. It only took about an hour to build this. It ain't purdy, but it dang sure is functional. Mission accomplished. Hope you enjoyed.

KJ

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3 Discussions

Yep, small table saws abound. Mine was a Christmas present from a spouse-person, so I can never replace it unless she forgets about it.

But I like the crosscut jig. It looks useful.

1 reply

Yes, Uncle Ed, not all of us DIYers have a shop with all the bells and whistles. I've accomplished some nice things with limited tools and especially with all my jigs, which I keep waxed, of course, of course, Uncle Ed.

LITTLE SHOP.pngWell, Wilbur.png

Timely post Kink, I too sadly are a member of the small table saw group. Meetings held on Tuesdays here :)

Seriously this is exactly what I need, thank you.