Instructables

Make Virtually Free Hanging Planters/Upside down tomatoes

Step 6: July 6 Update!

Here is the upside down basket of tomatoes this date. My conclusions: Tomatoes are great. I think this is a successful experiment, and was fun doing. However, overall, I feel that any added benefits from this method are outweighed by just a few disadvantages. 1: since the root ball is contained in such a small area, more often watering was required. 2. Eventually, the weight of the plant and fruit combined might cause the whole thing to crash to the ground. 3. Not that esthetically pleasing. 4. the old "in the ground" method has been around a lot longer, and with a little care, always works! What do you think? Cman
 
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mdeibert13 months ago
How tall is the 4x4 post you are using, and how deep is it buried in the ground/concrete?
robj981682 years ago
"Not that esthetically pleasing"

Are you serious? This looks fantastic!!!
hawgnutz5 years ago
I use a hanging tomato plant, here, to keep it away from rats, mice, and shrews that ate my first crop of tomatoes. They would wait until the fruit ripened, then eat half of it. Now, I have one plant in a container and two hanging plants. The hanging Romas are going great. The other plant suffered a setback, but it is starting to bloom, now. Ditto on using some container to shield the plant when you fill the cavity with soil. I used an old plant container that one of my larger plants came in. It worked great. It fully supported my hanging planter and shielded my tomato plant from breakage. I see you used the top of the planter for marigolds. It looks good and keeps bugs away, too!