Introduction: Make Your Own Design W/ DIY LED Lighting

Make your own design with DIY Lighting LED bulbs using basic parts from the home improvement store! This is an inexpensive and flexible way to create bright lighting that fits your space, no matter whether you design it for your shop or your home.

Please ask a professional before attempting any electrical work. This project is for demonstration purposes and is designed to inspire lighting ideas only and should not be confused with electrical advice.

Step 1: Materials Needed:

For this project you need:

Parts

  • LED Incandescent Replacement Bulbs (11 watts, 60 equivalent)
  • Light Boxes
  • Light Receptacles
  • 1 Light Switch
  • 1 Switch Box
  • ½ inch Conduit
  • Male/Female Conduit Connectors
  • 14 gauge 14-2 wire
  • Extension Cord
  • Wire Nuts
  • Misc Screws

Tools Needed:

  • Wire Stripper/Cutter
  • Utility Knife
  • Hacksaw
  • Screwdriver (Regular & Philips)
  • Drill/Driver
  • Pliers

Step 2: Assembling the Lights

Method

  1. Cut the conduit to length with a hacksaw.
  2. Next, remove the shielding from your 14 gauge wire and cut to length.
  3. Strip the ends with a wire stripper
  4. Cut the female end of the extension cord off, remove the casing and strip the three wires.
  5. Pop out the metal on the metal switch box and connect the male/female conduit adapters and thread the wire through.
  6. To connect the two boxes, thread the wires through the conduit pipe and into the metal switch box.
  7. Connect the ground wire together and ground the metal box. Connect the hot and neutral to the light receptacle from both sides.
  8. Secure the light receptacles to the boxes and screw in the bulbs.

Final Box:

  1. Now repeat the same step to your other boxes, until you reach your final box.
  2. Connect the conduit to the adapter, and it's a good idea to glue this.
  3. Ground the metal box, and connect the hot and the neutral to the light receptacle.
  4. Secure the receptacle to the box and screw in the bulb.

Adding a Switch:

To make it easy to turn the lights on and off, let's use a switch.

  1. Bring out the switch box, the switch and the extension cord connected to the lights.
  2. Cut the extension cord in half and remove the shielding and strip the ends.
  3. Thread through both cords to the light switch box and connect both to the light switch.
  4. Secure the switch to the box and add the cover.
  5. Check all your grounds and connections and plug it in.

Step 3: Conclusion - Watch the Video

For a more in depth look, please take a look at the video that goes over the various steps.

Comments

author
Budweiser143 (author)2015-03-14

Sorry, 1 last thing: you need to use PVC glue to glue the connectors to the PVC pipe.

author
Budweiser143 (author)2015-03-14

Not trying to knock your project, but from an electrical standpoint, where your cord goes in to the 1st metal octagon box/light fixture, you need to use a metal romex connector to prevent the wires from being yanked out. Also, where your cord goes in to the plastic box (I would use a metal "handy box" there) the orange wire needs to be pushed completely in to the the box (about 1/8-1/4") so that your THHN is not sticking out of the box.

Lastly, although using a female adapter on the outside with a male connector threaded in to it from the inside is technically "ok" you can save yourself a bit of money by using a male connector going in to the box, with a locknut threaded on to it from the inside. (this is how we do it in the field)

author
Budweiser143 (author)2015-03-14

Not trying to knock your project, but from an electrical standpoint, where your cord goes in to the 1st metal octagon box/light fixture, you need to use a metal romex connector to prevent the wires from being yanked out. Also, where your cord goes in to the plastic box (I would use a metal "handy box" there) the orange wire needs to be pushed completely in to the the box (about 1/8-1/4") so that your THHN is not sticking out of the box.

Lastly, although using a female adapter on the outside with a male connector threaded in to it from the inside is technically "ok" you can save yourself a bit of money by using a male connector going in to the box, with a locknut threaded on to it from the inside. (this is how we do it in the field)

About This Instructable

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Bio: Hi I'm Linn and on my Youtube Channel I have lots of great videos about building, construction and fun projects. You can also check ... More »
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