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Objective

The purpose of this instructable is to show you how to build a portable object photography soft-light box using low-cost materials and simple tools. The box should easily fold up and store under a bed or behind furniture. Then when it's time to shoot, the box can be quickly reassembled and set up.

Overview

  1. Attach velcro strips to the rear flaps of the box
  2. Cut a hatch on top
  3. Attach hinge and pull handle to hatch
  4. Cut side windows
  5. Attach diffuser fabric to side windows
  6. Whiten box's interior
  7. Install background sheet
  8. Test shoot
  9. Test box collapsing and reassembly
  10. Lessons learned and ideas for improvement

Suggestion

Before you start, read this instructable from beginning to end; it should make your building experience much easier and much less tedious. However, I added enough pictures that if your English is limited, you can still follow the instructable by looking at the illustrations. (Move over, IKEA!)

Step 1: Gather Your Tools

Tools Needed

  • Sharp Scissors or shears
  • Box cutter or large blade hobby knife
  • Straightedge* or ruler
  • Marker, pen or pencil
  • (Optional) Clothing Iron

*Note: if you use a non-measuring straightedge, you'll need to obtain a measuring tape or ruler as well.

Step 2: Gather Your Materials

Project Materials

  • Cardboard box
  • Flat-white tape
  • Neutral-white muslin fabric
  • Large format heavy white paper or poster board
  • Adhesive Velcro strips
  • White Sheets of Printer/Copier Paper
  • Blue masking tape (painter's tape)

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ABOUT YOUR PROJECT MATERIALS

We do allow much flexibility on choosing your materials as your needs may vary. It is the intent of the description below to let you know the intention of how the materials are used:

Choose a cardboard box that will suit the average size of the object you'll be photographing. It is important that the box is large enough to allow ample room around the object to give you some flexibility composing the shot with your camera. For my project I chose a shipping box measuring approximately 25 x 25 x 25 inches (635 x 635 x 635 mm). You don't have to choose a cube-shaped box like I did, but I chose mine because I felt a cube would be much easier to work with. You'll see why further on in the construction steps.

Ideally the white tape should be flat white (matt white) to aid in diffusing the white light bouncing inside the box. A 2-inch wide (about 51-mm wide) white-paper Artist Tape should work well. The Artist Tape can on occasion be a bit pricy, so if you know of a good alternative, please share that information in the comments section. Your contribution would be much appreciated. The tape has to be sticky enough to hold the fabric taut across a cutout window of the cardboard box.

  • Note: later on in the construction, I noticed that the Artist Tape was not flat white, but close to a satin finish. However the glare from it was minimal so in practice it became a non-issue.

The purpose of the white muslin fabric is to diffuse white light coming into the box from your external light sources. If the fabric is too thick, it might diffuse better but will also attenuate the light excessively. If it's too transparent, you might lose the diffusing effect that is essential for soft light photography. When you find the fabric, hold it up to the light to test how much light gets through. The size of the fabric, at a minimum, should be large enough to cover both sides of your box. I bought 6 feet (1.8 m); I wanted to have some left over for other projects.

The large format heavy white paper or poster board, which will be used as a background, needs to be as wide as the interior width of the box and as long as the height + length of the box. For example, if, hypothetically, the interior of your box is 20 inches wide by 26 inches high by 30 inches long (508 mm by 660 mm by 762 mm), cut the the background 20 inches wide (508 mm) by 56 inches (142 cm) long. If you want your shots to look professional, it is worth going through the effort of obtaining a roll of large-format white paper. The last thing you want to do is taping two sheets together to make up the length and end up with an ugly seam the picture. My poster board was too small, so I splurged and bought for $19.51 USD a roll of inkjet printer/plotter paper measuring 24 inches by 150 feet. That should last me for a while. I calculated that it might render about 35 background sheets. You don't need to spend that kind of money. There are economical alternatives that you can exploit such as using the reverse plain white side of a roll of a heavy-weight gift-wrapping paper. Again, we welcome your ideas.

The Velcro strips should be the kind that has a pressure-sensitive adhesive side with the peel-off backing. Both hook and loop strips should each have an adhesive side. You can still use the ones that don't have adhesives, but you'll need to find another way to affix them to the box, whether you use hot glue, regular glue, staples or other adhering methods of your choosing.

The white sheets of printer/copier paper are used for covering any exposed color from the interior box walls. If the box is white inside, you have no problem. If the interior is cardboard brown, then you should cover that up with white paper. The idea is to reflect diffused white light within the box for even illumination. You may opt for spray-painting the interior of the box with flat-white (matt white) paint instead of lining with sheets of paper. Ensure that paint is as neutral white as it can be.

The blue masking tape (painter's tape) is optional but useful. For example, the tape is used as a hinge for a hatch. If you choose to remove the hatch entirely, the blue tape will peel off the box without damaging the box's surface.

Not included in the materials list is something that you might need in the future, packaging tape. Eventually you might need to make repairs to the cardboard box. Rather than using your expensive white or blue tape, you may consider buying some packaging tape. They are fairly inexpensive if you know where to look. Try not to use the packaging tape inside the box as the tape tend to be very glossy.

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For the following steps we're going to assemble the box and apply the velcro strips.

Step 3: Unfold and Reassemble the Box

Close the inner flaps of one end of the box. Leave the other end of the box open.

This side is now designated as the rear of the box and--obviously--the opposite end is now the front.

Step 4: Cut and Adhere the Velcro Strips to the Inside of the Outer Flap

Cut the strips approximately 3 inches ( about 8 cm) in length.

Peel the backing of one side of the velcro strips and adhere near one corner of the flap and press against it firmly. I placed them at an angle about 2 inches (5 cm) from the corner, but the angle shouldn't be critical.

Step 5: Peel Off the The Second Strip and Remove the Backing

Separate the fastened strip if you haven't done so already.

Step 6: Lightly Place the Strip Back on the Adhered Strip

and by "lightly" it means just barely holding on.

Step 7: Close the Outer Flap and Push Hard Against the Inner Flap to Firmly Adhere the Second Velcro Strip

Tip:

  • If you leave the other two flaps open, you can put your hand inside to push against the inner flap for support while you press from the outside.

Step 8: Open the Flap Carefully Ensuring That the Strip Adhered to the Inner Flap

You should hear the satisfying peeling velcro sound as you open the flap. If not, ensure that the strip is still positioned correctly, close the flap and apply pressure again.

  • Note: if you tear a layer off the box, cover the injury with permanent tape and adhere the velcro on top of the tape. It happened to me later on in this build, so I used a piece of white tape to make the repair.

Step 9: Repeat for All Four Corners As Shown and Close the Rear Side of the Box

That should do. Now you can securely close this end of the box.

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For the next steps you will focus on creating a hatch on the top side of the box. The hatch serves several purposes:

  • The hatch gives you easy access to the subject (object) from above to reposition it without disturbing your camera setup.
  • It also gives you better reach of the interior rear of the box for mounting your background material.
  • The upper opening gives you an optional 'skylight' window for bringing in additional illumination to your subject from above.
  • It gives your camera a bird's-eye-view perspective if you want to shoot downward.

Step 10: Ensure the Box Is Rotated So That the Gap Between the Inner Flaps Is Vertical

The gap between the outer flaps should be horizontal.

  • Why? The interior flap orientation provides a lip for installing your background.

Step 11: Measure and Mark Cutting Guides for All Four Sides of the Hatch

On the top surface of the box, measure 3 inches (76 mm) margin from the edges and make some guiding marks for your straightedge. I just put four crosses with my indelible marker representing the four corners of the cutout.

  • Note: if your box is smallish, you can adjust the measurement to 2 inches (51 mm). The idea is to not cut too close to the edge because doing so might compromise the box's structural integrity. You're going to make more cutouts so you'll see why. Use your judgement.

Step 12: Cut Out the Hatch

Using the marks you made from the previous step, cut along the straightedge and repeat for the four sides to cut out a rectangular piece. Ensure that your cuts are straight and clean and keep track of the orientation of the cutout piece because you will be putting it back in place.

Tips:

  • Use blue tape to hold your straight edge in place so that you can focus on making a clean cut.
  • When cutting, especially on a double-thick walled box, cut in multiple strokes so that your edges don't become jagged. You can see above that my first cuts were far from perfect until I started to use the multiple-stroke-cutting technique.
  • To keep track of the orientation of the hatch piece, draw an arrow on it pointing to the front of the box. I also wrote "Top" on the hatch piece, which, along with the arrow, was quite redundant since I already had the big FedEx logo on it, but I marked them for illustrative purposes.

Step 13: Reinstall the Cutout, Hinge It, and Install a Pull Handle

Maintaining the correct orientation of the cutout piece, put it back in the rectangular opening then tape the rear gap to the box surface to make a hinge. Tape almost exactly the full length of the gap. I used blue masking tape in case at a later date I decide to remove the hatch entirely without damaging the surface of the box.

To make the pull handle, on the edge opposite to the hinge, loop a piece of tape perpendicular to the edge and create a loop to make a pull handle*. Now the hatch should be easily opened with the pull handle.

  • * To make the pull handle, cut an 8-inch piece of tape, then at the 4-inch point put a mark on the tape. Do the same for the 3-inch point and for the 5-inch point. Fold the tape at the 4-inch mark and let it adhere to itself for about 1 inch (the 3- and 5-inch marks meet). Stick one end the tape on top of the hatch and the other end to the bottom.

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This concludes the hatch-making section. Next, you're going to make the side windows.

Step 14: Measure and Mark the Side of the Box

As you did with the top hatch, on the side of the box measure 3 inches (76 mm) from the edge and mark the four corners.

Step 15: Cut Out the Rectangular Piece

With the aid of a straight edge, cut a rectangular window. Repeat for the opposite side. Save the pieces you cut out because you will be using them as templates.

Tip:

  • In the following steps you will be installing the fabric for the side windows and lining the interior of the box with white paper. If instead of covering the interior with paper you choose to paint the interior with flat-white (matt white) spray paint, now is a great opportunity to do so, because you would not need to protect the fabric from overspray. Ensure that you also paint the interior side of all 4 flaps located at the front the box.

Step 16: Cut a Piece of Muslin Fabric Larger Than Your Template

Place that piece you saved on top of a single layer of the muslin fabric.

Leaving between 1- to 2-inch (25 to 51 mm) margin around the template, cut the fabric around the template.

Tips:

  • You can use your marker to create a guide for cutting. The marks you make will be covered up by the white tape.
  • If the fabric is waaay too wrinkled that no amount of stretching will help it, iron it. It's not that difficult.
  • Use sharp scissors (shears are better). It is just too easy to make a jagged cut with dull scissors, like I did.

Step 17: Attach Muslin Fabric to Inside of Window

Using your white tape, attach the fabric you just cut to the inside 'frame' of the rectangular window. The fabric should to be somewhat drum tight so that it stays flat. Repeat for the opposite side.

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Next, you're going to whiten the interior of the box.

Step 18: Cover the Interior Surfaces of the Box With Sheets of White Copier Paper

    You can skip this step if you already painted the interior of the box.

    Using sheets of copier paper and white tape, cover every bit of the interior surface of the box, except the fabric, of course. If there are any glossy surfaces, you need to cover those too; that is to avoid any uneven lighting reflections.

    On the front side of the box, cover the interior side of the inner and outer flaps as well. You'll see why later on.

    Tips:

    • To cover the frame around the hatch, just use the white tape.
    • Bring the edge of the tape as close as you can to the box's folds. If you cover the folds with tape or paper, it might hinder folding and your covering work might be ruined when the box is folded.

    Step 19: Cut the Background Sheet to Size

    Cut the sheet width a tiny bit smaller than the interior width of your box. The length should be the height + the length of the interior of the box. Since my box is a cube and the interior is about 24 inches (61 cm) in the three dimensions, then the size of my background sheet should 24 inches wide by 48 inches (122 cm) long. It's my luck that the roll is already 24 inches wide

    Step 20: Prepare Background Sheet for Mounting

    As shown in the picture fold about 1 inch (25 mm) along the width of the sheet. I wrapped mine around a ruler and made a U-shape channel.

    Step 21: Mount the Background Sheet Inside the Box

    The folded end fits over the top edge of the inner flaps of the rear of the box. You'll need to open the outer flaps and the hatch so that you can use both hands for this operation. Take care not to wrinkle or fold the background sheet. The idea is that the background sheet should hang from the top and gently curve forward towards the front of the box. Once you install the sheet, close the outer rear flaps so that they hold the background sheet in place.

    Step 22: Test Shoot

    Arrange your two light sources as shown and place your test subject inside your hand-made soft light box and place the object right in the center of your stage. Aim the lights closer or further from the side windows for different effects and lighting intensities. Shoot pictures with your camera at different settings to see what kind of results you get. Experiment, experiment, experiment and take lots of photos. Out of those you may find this one gem that looks great.

    When you are shooting an object that has a reflective surface, one technique you can do is close the outer flaps in front of the box until you get a slit just wide enough for your camera. That way the object will reflect the slit but not the photographer. That is a technique that some professional photographers use when they are shooting products such as new silverware or pots and pans. Next time you open a catalog or an ad, take a close look at the product pictures and notice what is reflected on the product image.

    Step 23: Collapse and Reassemble Test

    You already know how to fold up the box, but it is important that you first pull out the background sheet carefully to avoid putting any visible wrinkles or folds on the sheet. Roll from the folded edge first and go with the natural curve when it was installed in the box. Use a low-tack tape like the blue tape to secure the roll.

    When you reinstall the background sheet, unroll as shown and attach the folded edge back on the top edge of the inner flap. The two free corners of the sheet might curl up; just tack it down with blue tape so that the outer front flaps can swing freely.

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    You are good to go. Enjoy the rewarding activity of object photography.

    Step 24: Lessons Learned and Ideas for Improvement

    • Get sharp scissors or shears. Dull ones create unnecessary work and you end up with poor results.
    • To cut cardboard neatly, especially a double thickness one, using a straight edge anchored to cardboard surface with blue tape, then cut the cardboard in multiple strokes.
    • Before installing the white fabric, paint the interior of the box with neutral white spray paint. It is worth it. Lining the interior of the box with paper is very tedious and time-consuming and you might have better results with paint.
    • Iron the fabric before installing it.
    • When installing the velcros to the rear flaps, cut one piece about 3 inches long and the mating piece, 1 inch long. Align the small piece in the center of the larger piece. That should avoid tearing a layer off the box.
    • Instead of velcro, use small powerful disc magnets. Dig a shallow hole on the surface of the cardboard flap using the magnet as a template, and glue (or hot glue) the magnet into the hole. Then, to ensure that they align correctly when the flaps are closed, stack another disc magnet on top of the glued one. Then take a pencil and rub the lead over the one on top so that when you close the flap, the mark from the pencil transfers to the other flap. You can then use that marking as guide for gluing the second magnet.
    • On the subject of magnets, secure with white tape two small disc magnets on the back and top edge of the background sheet. The inner flaps would have another pair of magnets already glued or taped in place. Then it would be a matter of maneuvering the background sheet into the box and clicking it to the magnets. Easy peasy.
    • When shooting a photo, anchor the camera down on a tripod. If you have a DSLR or a camera that provides manual control; use the lowest ISO setting; disable the flash; focus manually; set the lens opening to the smallest opening possible to increase the depth of field (depth of focus); and since the camera might be using a slow shutter speed to compensate for the smaller lens opening and low ISO, it is best to trigger the camera either remotely or using the built-in 10 second timer to avoid jiggling the camera when pressing the trigger. I noticed that when I was photographing a glass tumbler, my camera did a horrible job at automatically focussing because it could not see the glass surface on which to focus. Once I chose manual focus, I was able to lock down the focus and take good pictures.
    • To light from the top, make a cardboard frame larger than the hatch. Install muslin fabric on the frame. Open the hatch and lay the frame over the hatch opening. Now you can light it from above and diffuse that light as well.
    • When the box is disassembled and folded up, the rolled up background sheet needs to go into some kind of protective container such as a mailing tube.
    <p>Made it from this Great Tutorial! Enjoyed this project very much. Very detailed and easy to follow. </p>
    <p>Wow! The photos look great. What size box did you make?</p>
    <p>Thanks. Don't have exact measurements at the moment but roughly 400mm x 400mm x 400mm. Having a lot of fun with it. </p>
    <p>Made one! Thanks a lot for this nice instructable. From 5:50pm to 7:33pm - from starting to look for material, to finishing photo editing the first picture. Including looking for tools, material, wasted time trying to make magnets working on the back but found it too weak. (in the front panel it worked fine, though.) <br><br>and it's 7:38 I'm done making this post! My first light box for my 3d printed stuff! thank you.<br><br></p>
    <p>That is awesome. Thank you for sharing!!! Your model looks great.</p><p> What size is the box?</p>
    10x10x12&quot;<br>I like to swap my own head on action figures and historical statues.
    <p>I should mention that I used white console tape and copy paper for walls, and paper towels for backdrop. Under these yellow light, the image came out very green so I had to make some color adjustment. Should I go for daylight lamps? I'm happy as is, though. </p>
    <p>Woohoo! Talk about a detailed 'ible. Off the charts and a great read. Thanks for all the time you've put into this. Very nice and useful. </p>
    <p>Thanks for the complement. The actual build would have taken a couple of hours at most, but making this instructable took awhile, about one order of magnitude more spread out in a week. I must say it was fun to do and I look forward making more.</p>
    <p>Thanks, your post easy to follow. Hopefully, the beginners get helped by the post. I also recommend the post (</p><p>http://www.clippingpathexperts.com/blog/5-steps-to-make-inexpensive-photography-light-box/</p><p>)</p>
    <p>Made with a large roll of white paper I had floating around instead of muslin. Not quite as much light makes it through, but still works well enough! </p>
    <p>Looking very nice. If you have the doors on the front opening of the box, some of that light would reflected to the front side of the object giving it a nice shadowless all around illumination. Illumination from above won't hurt either. If you would like to make some some of the shadows disappear on your existing shots you might want to consider running it through and photo editing program (GIMP is free and very good) and adjust the brightness and contrast at least, to brighten the white background. I'll refer you to an award-winning instructable to help you do just that: <a href="https://www.instructables.com/id/Pure-White-Background-Photography-Using-Smartphone/" rel="nofollow">https://www.instructables.com/id/Pure-White-Background-Photography-Using-Smartphone/</a></p><p>Congratulations on your construction and thanks for posting your shots.</p>
    <p>Congrats on your win! I think you deserve it.</p>
    <p>Very in depth steps! Thank you</p>
    <p>I am a professional photographer... Great job on explaining how to make this. RE: artist tape, save some money by running the fabric close to the end, use a glue stick or double sided tape to hold it. Then, use 3/4&quot; artist tape from Office Depot which is inexpensive <a href="http://www.officedepot.com/a/products/609696/Staedtler-Artist-Tape-34-x-360/" rel="nofollow"> http://www.officedepot.com/a/products/609696/Stae...</a> it's about $5. Or drywall tape from a home center. Just hit it with a little spray adhesive. <a href="http://t.homedepot.com/p/Sheetrock-250-ft-Drywall-Joint-Tape-382175/100321613." rel="nofollow"> http://www.officedepot.com/a/products/609696/Stae...</a> RE: Fabric use Rip Stop Nylon, which what most soft boxes are made with. If the light is too harsh, just drape another layer on the outside. The &quot;quality&quot; of light is a function of both distance from the light to the fabric panel and the distance from the panel to the object, the closer the panel is to the object, the less defined the shadows.</p><p>RE: White background paper, try butcher paper from any restaurant supply or plain white paper cloths.</p><p>Long and short, if you are shooting small objects, you might consider a smaller box</p><p>If all else fails, you can save time and probably money buying one from B&amp;H Photo for $45. <a href="http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/331824-REG/Interfit_INT296_Studio_Light_Tent.html" rel="nofollow"> http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/331824-REG/...</a></p>
    <p>Those were very useful suggestions. Thank you for your feedback.</p>
    <p>Very nice! You deserve a patch. I would have made this if I hadn't already wussed out and bought a portable photo studio kit on eBay, partly because it included lights.</p><p>Excellent job on your first Instructable!</p>
    Thank you so much. Nice patch. My very first
    <p>This is a fantastic idea, I like. I'm taking a break from making BBQ cook threads, but when I get back to it, I'm going to make one of these. The first photos of my cook thread usually have daylight streaming sideways at them through the kitchen window which often sets up a lovely shot. By the time 'low and slow' cooking was done, my end photos were often taken at night. Building this 'ible could help me get nicer finished plate shots. Thank you!</p>
    <p>Oh please post an &quot;I Made it!&quot; with example food photos. I would like to see what that would look like with soft lighting. I imagine that the photo would incorporate soft lighting plus a spot light source focus on the food itself to avoid casting shadows on the background paper. That way you can control the glistening effect that makes food look more appetizing and it also gives it an outdoorsy effect.</p>
    <p>Wow, my friend, even more good advice with spot light and glistening. I like that, too, I believe I can raise the bar that high. I'll probably be making cook threads again in November or so, I'll post an &quot;I Made it!&quot; when I get back into that swing. Thank you for being so helpful!</p>
    <p>I've been thinking about the spot light and perhaps it doesn't need to be a spot, but a single point source light to emulate the sun. Like a single halogen natural white light source. That is if you want to give it a daylight feel to it.</p>
    <p>I love that daylight feeling!! That's one of the reasons I love taking daytime cook thread shots by the kitchen window, they have a 'blue sky' feel. I replaced my kitchen CFLs with LED daylight bulbs to help get the yellow out of my night cook thread shots and it's helped a lot but still, my night cook shots are underexposed. I picked up some thinner white fabric last year to stretch on a simple frame with a daylight LED shining through from the side onto the plate (advice from a pro friend) but still have not put that together. The idea that I can capture glistening in a box has me hypnotized. Do you think I could get that effect with a daylight LED? Not sure if there is a price difference, it may work better to use halogen. I'll check into it and report my findings in my &quot;I Made it!&quot; later this year. Hope you like photos of low and slow smoked meat (I smoke blocks of tofu for vegan family and friends, too).</p>
    <p>Let me know for sure how it turned out. It is a great thing to learn from each other. Food photography is something that I have never attempted. I have a question. Do you shoot with a white background or do you shoot with a place-setting background?</p>
    <p>My food photography is simple, mostly because I don't know how to make it complicated. I just got out of auto focus into manual focus not long ago. There was a great instructable that explained ISO, shutter and aperature so I'm looking forward to experimenting with that. I use my kitchen counter as a backdrop and sometimes layer linens/fabric under glass and other plates to provide colour contrast. Here's a few examples.</p><p>I'm sure the first two daylight/nightlight examples are taken in auto focus but could either have incandescent or LED daylight bulbs for the night plate shots. One was a Weiner TD I turned into a Rocky Horror Picture Show theme and the other is cabbage rolls that starts with diced onions.</p><p>I think I used manual focus for the other two -- carrot cake smoked in my kamado and the pho soup with smoked steak skirt slices. I would still use the counter for daylight shots, I like the atmosphere, but a soft light box for the night plate shots would be awesome to have.</p>
    <p>Hmmm yummy appetizing dishes. I'm ready to eat the last one. Pho?</p>
    <p>Yes, pho with sliced, smoked steak skirt - that's how my butcher labeled it. When you buy a half pasture-fed steer and tell your butcher you're a smoke head, you get creative cuts to play with. The pho tasted amazing, the smoke in the beef added to the char flavour on the ginger, onions, cinnamon, anise used to make the broth. The Rocky Horror set up had specialized entries for Frank N Furter, Edie, Dr. Scott (see his sexy leg rising?), Brad and Janet. Thinking about how much fun it is to dress up plate shots I'm sure I need to make a large size soft light box. I'm also thinking I should affix rings and such to pin things up for theatrical cook threads. Even this MkRib shot could translate to a soft light box set up if I had somewhere to attach and drape the tablecloth background. (For the foodies, my MkRib is made from a four bone de-boned section of a smoked rack of ribs.)</p>
    <p>Well, I *WAS* going to buy a lightbox set up, until I saw this; I have everything on hand, except for the blue tape....and I am thinking about hand painting the inside with flat white paint that I have on hand :) TY for this! </p>
    <p>The tape doesn't have to be the blue masking tape. Should be a tape that can be easily removed without tearing up your work but strong enough to do the job.</p><p>I'm looking forward to seeing your results.</p>
    Thanks for a well done 'ible. What are those lamps you are using please?
    <p>I bought them on Ebay in 2014 and paid 35.00 USD. They are called: 300W Photo Studio Table Top Light Kit Stands+Bulbs+Reflectors For Soft Box Tent. I scanned Ebay a little and found that they are a bit cheaper today. My only complaint is that some of the screws that hold the bell to the tripod are a little loose and I had to continually tighten them. The issue was solved when I put a little locktite on the screws.</p>
    Thank you for the reply. I'm in the UK but will search. I've heard that nail varnish is great for keeping screw from coming loose but haven't had anything to try it on to verify!
    <p>Someone ask me about the image in step 24, if I made it myself. The answer is Yes and No. I downloaded 3 public-domain cliparts and edited them together for a humorous take on thinking out of the box concept. The image of the &quot;bright idea&quot; silhouette had a filament light bulb in the largest cloud, so I updated it with an LED bulb clipart. Some of the editing also involved placing the dark figure inside the box.</p><p>Clip art sources:</p><p><a href="https://openclipart.org/detail/22259/open-box" rel="nofollow">https://openclipart.org/detail/22259/open-box</a></p><p><a href="https://openclipart.org/detail/222289/bright-idea" rel="nofollow">https://openclipart.org/detail/222289/bright-idea</a></p><p><a href="https://openclipart.org/detail/48409/light-bulb-led-on" rel="nofollow">https://openclipart.org/detail/48409/light-bulb-le...</a></p><p>License:</p><p><a href="https://openclipart.org/share" rel="nofollow">https://openclipart.org/share</a></p>
    <p>bought a similar product to use; this one is much better than the one I bought; will definitely make it</p>
    <p>Did you buy the rigid kind or the soft tent kind? What are your impressions about it versus the cardboard box?</p>
    <p>Cool! This will improve my instructables pics and hide my messy workbench at the same time. Win-win.</p>
    <p>I would like to see what it looks like when you make yours. I know you are going to improve it and make it cooler.</p>
    <p>great instruction,..</p><p>thanks for sharing</p><p>:)</p><p>I will try to do :)</p>
    <p>You're welcome. </p><p>Please make one and improve on it if you want. Please post a picture when you make it.</p>
    <p>Good thinking on the wrapping paper. I don't know if this would work but maybe fabric tape from first aid kit might make a substitute. They also have a tissue tape. I don't think a washi tape would be a good substitute because it doesn't stick very well. Also http://www.findtape.com/ has tons of tape to chose from. I haven't purchased from them but have it bookmarked so if I ever need a tape fix, I might give it a try.</p>
    <p>In response to the fabric tape used in first-aid kits, I think that would work if they were matte white but, at least the ones that I have, have a glossy sheen, more so than my roll of artist tape. The surgical tape has a very good stickiness to it and it might do the job well, but it's expensive unless you buy in large bulk quantities.</p>
    <p>I enjoyed looking at that site. I think the artist tape they list that is comparable to mine cost less. I'm too embarrassed to say how much I paid for mine. </p><p>The washi tape doesn't seem to come in the 2-inch variety. It is also described as being a little see-thru. It might not be as economical in the long run. I don't know much about the stickiness but I'll take your word for it.</p><p>I looked at the gaffer's tape and 15.60 USD for a 2 inch x 60 yards roll is high but not as high if you were to buy it locally. I've used it before and it would be my preferred tape (if I didn't have to pay that much for it). It is super sticky and matte white. The artist/console tape of the same dimensions is 6.21 USD per roll. I paid 13.37 USD at amazon Prime which means I did not pay for shipping. I suspect findtape offers a better deal.</p><p>Thanks for the find.</p>
    Way cool! <br>Thanks for sharing! <br>You've got my Vote. <br>
    <p>Thank Ye Matey. Fair winds!</p>
    <p>god, it's genius.</p>
    <p>Thanks for sharing!</p>
    <p>Nice!!! Nice! Nice! Thanks!</p>
    <p>Obrigado, obrigado, bem-vindo !!</p>
    <p>Really nice! We'll expect to see lots more 'ibles from you now, at Eureka Factory, since you've got this awesome light box now! :-) </p>
    <p>I'll try my best. I have a small 'ible that is coming up. It should take no time to build.</p>

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