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Picture of Make Your Own Yarn Winder for Center Pull Balls
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I have been looking for a ball winder to wind center-pull balls of yarn. After reading many reviews of commercially made winders, it seems that all of them have something wrong with them. So I decided to make my own. It is not perfect, but I made it all by myself! This Ball Winder can wind 100 grams of yarn easily, and I was able to double up and wind two 100 gram balls together as well!!

This instructable may look long, but you could make it in a few hours.  

I didn't feel like working in the workshop so I designed this so you don't have to use any power tools or hand tools that would make a mess.

Most of the items I had on hand.  I just bought the lazy susan bearing ($2.19) and the tubes of silicone (~$7.00 each), and the binding post (~$1.00).  

Using a Yarn Swift with the Ball Winder is a good idea.  I made a swift out of wire hangers, a wine bottle, duct tape, and a box to stabilize the bottle.  It is a modified version of the Yarn Swift at http://aemmeleia.wordpress.com/2007/09/05/diy-yarn-swift-desparate-measures/.  I used 6 hangers instead of 4 and put the bottle in a box.  Didn't cost anything!


 
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Step 1: DEMONSTRATION VIDEO

Picture of DEMONSTRATION VIDEO




The beginning shows the parts of the ball winder and yarn swift and the end shows how to use it.    It might help as you go through the steps.

Step 2: Supply List and Tools (No Power Tools Needed!!)

Picture of Supply List and Tools (No Power Tools Needed!!)
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Supply List
  1. Duct Tape
  2. Corrugated cardboard or foam core board or re-used corrugated plastic (we have a lot of campaign signs up around town that eventually will need to come down)
  3. Lightweight cardboard (like the weight of an index card) big enough to cover the center hole of a CD.
  4. Cardboard or plastic tube with a diameter of at least an inch and at least 3-1/2 inches long. Toilet paper or paper towel rolls are fine, but the sturdier the better. You can use the centers of rolls of first aid tape, office supply tapes, athletic tape, twine. If a tube is not long enough, you can connect tubes with the same outer diameter with duct tape.
  5. Epoxy, Bondo, or something that is fairly hard when it cures. I vote for Oogoo*. It works great and is much less expensive than epoxy or Bondo [http://www.instructables.com/id/How-To-Make-Your-Own-Sugru-Substitute/]. If you use Oogoo, you’ll need a couple tubes of silicone sealant and cornstarch. I will refer to Oogoo in the instructions.
  6. 2 CDs (compact disc) that you are not going to use anymore or one CD and one cardboard circle with a hole in the center.
  7. Dowel with the diameter of pencil about 9 to 10 inches long or a round chopstick. Measurements do not need to be exact.
  8. A hollow tube that the dowel (above) would fit in. I found that a large felt marker with the tips and inside removed works really well. Or you can use a pencil (one side should be flat). This is to make a hollow tunnel.
  9. A stiff piece of plastic like a report cover or a transparency to make a cone shaped form.  Or a form already made.   The base should be about 2 inches in diameter base and 6 inches in height.
  10. A cylinder about at least 1/2 inch thick and about 3 inches in diameter.  A jar lid or scrap of PVC pipe would work.
  11. A cylinder that fits in the center of a duct tape roll and the duct tape roll itself or cylinder with about the same diameter as an almost empty duct tape roll.  Again, a scrap of PVC pipe would work.  Actually, any combination of two cylinders that are able to move freely, one in the center of the other. 
  12. A really narrow tube about 2 inches long.  The end of the wire coat hanger (#15 below) needs to fit in it.  I used a post that is used to bind stacks of paper together, a binding post and screw set (you don't need the screw part).  It is also called a "Sex Bolt" or "Post Sex Screw".  Really, it is called that.  It costs less than a dollar.  This really didn't work very well for its purpose, because the hollow part was only about 1/2 inch deep and the wire kept coming out.
  13. Mounting tape.
  14. Lazy Susan or Lazy Susan bearing. The square bearings are easier to work with. I bought one for $2.19 at a wood working shop.
  15. Heavy Gauge hard wire (like a wire coat hanger)
  16. Rubberbands - one small and one really long. I have Size 117B (7” laid flat and 1/8” wide).   I think you can also use elastic, but it may slip on the turners. If you use elastic, you might want use the kind with ridges (non-roll elastic) and/or coat it with silicone seal to give it friction.
  17. Double sided tape and contact cement or really good glue.  Not super glue.

Tools (No Power Tools!)
  1. Straight edge (anything with a firm straight side, like the side of a pencil)
  2. Ruler or measuring tape.
  3. Pencil and marking pen (that will mark duct tape).
  4. Scissors
  5. Pliers and wire cutter
  6. Box cutter or exacto knife
  7. Optional:  A fine toothed hand saw to cut plastic, if you don’t want to use a box cutter
*One caution about using Oogoo: Cornstarch is so very fine that any amount will make the duct tape lose its stickiness. Do your mixing well away from where you are constructing your Duct Tape Ball Winder. Wash your hands after handling any Oogoo materials and wipe down the parts you are working on before you begin again.

You will need about one large roll of Duct Tape and will probably use your box cutter or exacto knife for all the steps.  The Pro Grade DT is Awesome!

Step 3: Parts of the Ball Winder

Picture of Parts of the Ball Winder
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PARTS OF A DUCT TAPE BALL WINDER (and what you will be using to build each part)

Winder (CD & Dowel, Oogoo cone)

Spin Stabilizer made in two separate steps. (Cardboard Tube, Oogoo, hollow tube/pencil, corrugated cardboard or foam core, padded double sided sticky tape, rubberband, marking pen)

Lazy Susan  (Lazy Susan bearing, corrugated cardboard or foam core, double sided tape or Glue, marking pen.)

Turner (Jar, Cylinder, padded double sided sticky tape, Jar cap. long rubberband, contact cement)

Bottom Base (I didn't label it in the photo but it is the part at the very bottom that the Turner and Lazy Susan are taped to.

Step 4: STEP ONE: First Part of the Spin Stabilizer

Make this part of the Spin Stabilizer first so the Oogoo or whatever you are using can cure a bit.

Prepare the cardboard tube.
  1. Measure the diameter.
  2. Mark the length of the diameter down the side of the tube (First Mark).
  3. On the opposite side of this mark, make another mark on the top edge of the tube (Second Mark).
  4. Using a straight edge, extend the marks straight along the length of the tube. These should be very visible marks. You will need to see them later.
  5. Fit the rubberband around the tube level with the First Mark (not tightly, just enough so it doesn’t move). Use a narrow piece of duct tape to secure the rubberband to the tube at the First Mark.
  6. Roll the other side of the rubberband up to the edge of the tube at the Second Mark. Secure it with another narrow piece of duct tape.
  7. The rubberband is a guide for cutting the tube at an angle.
  8.  Mark the tube using the rubberband as a guide.
  9. Remove the rubberband and tape and with your box cutter or exacto knife, carefully cut along the line you have just drawn.
  10. Place the cut side of the tube against a flat surface. It should be pretty flush to the surface, but it doesn’t need to be perfect. This will be the Top of your tube.
Place theTunnel
  1. Along the Second Mark line, measure one diameter length from the Top edge. Make a short line that crosses the Second Mark line.
  2. Make a hole centered on the cross. The hole should be big enough to fit whatever you are using for #8 (hollow tube or pencil) on the Supply List.
  3. Push the hollow tube or pencil through the hole. Angle it so one end is even with the cut opening of the tube. Using duct tape, securely seal the Top opening. Several strips should cover the Top depending on the diameter tube. Push the hollow tube or pencil against the inside of the tape so it sticks and you can see it from the outside tape side.  Center it.
Fill the Cardboard Tube.
  1. Mix your Oogoo, epoxy or bondo. With the Top end flat on a firm surface, fill the tube. Fill but don’t over fill and make either end bulge out. If you are using a pencil to make the “tunnel”, after the Oogoo set a little bit, twist it around so it doesn’t stick.
  2. Set the tube upright. The pencil or hollow tube should be perpendicular to the surface of the Top.
  3. Let it set until it is firm.
  4. Remove the tape from the top and fill any gaps with more Oogoo.
  5. Set it aside to fully cure. 

Step 5: STEP TWO: Make the Winder

The CD
  1. Cut a piece of lightweight cardboard big enough to cover the hole in the CD.
  2. Duct tape the piece of cardboard over the hole in the CD.
  3. Turn the CD over and mark the center of the hole. Cut a small X centered over the hole or center mark. The X should not be larger than the diameter of the dowel.
  4. Push the dowel through the X and arrange it so one side is about 3 inches long and the other side is about 6+ inches long. The shorter side should be on the side of the duct tape,
  5. Tear many narrow strips of duct tape about 2 inches long and set aside so it is readily available for you to use. I tore a piece of duct tape lengthwise down the middle, then tore each of the two pieces in half again.

The Short End
  1. Holding the dowel perpendicular to the CD, with the long side down, place one strip of duct tape about 1 inch up the dowel.
  2. Lightly secure along the dowel to the joint of the dowel and CD. Using something pointy, poke the tape so it adheres to the joint. Lightly secure the remaining length of tape to the CD.
  3. Check to make sure the dowel is still perpendicular to the CD by checking at eye level. If it isn't, adjust the strips of tape until it is. Then, firmly press the strips of tape into place.
  4. Keep adding additional strips of tape to make the dowel/CD joint secure in its perpendicular position. The strips of tape can be wider. You will probably have to cut slits in the tape at the joint in order to make the tape lie flat. Use small pieces of tape to cover the end. Using wider pieces of tape, neatly cover this side of the CD.
The Long End

Make your cone form.

  1. Lay your plastic flat. You might want to tack the corners down to keep it from sliding around.
  2. Mark the center of each long side of the plastic.  I folded it in half and crimped the ends to markthe centers.
  3. Draw a vertical line connecting them. Using your marking pen, draw an arc by measuring 8 inches from the top mark at several different places. Make enough marks that you can connect the dots and draw an arc. Or, make an arc by holding an 8 inch string at the top with one hand and the pen in the other and swing and mark the curve from one end to the other. Or use any other method you know.
  4. Hold a ruler horizontally crossing the vertical line. Move the ruler up and down until you find the point where the horizontal line is about 7 inches from one side of the arc to the other. Mark these two intersections. Draw a line from these points to the first mark you made at the center of the top. It forms a shape like a big slice of pie. Cut it out. Draw several other straight lines from the tip to the arc. This will help you to line up the plastic when you roll the plastic into the cone shape.
  5. Trim the point about 2 inches down. I trimmed it only 1 inch and had to keep cutting.  There should be a 1/4 inch opening at the tip.
  6. Roll the form and overlap the ends until the bottom (fat end) of the cone is about 2 inches in diameter. Match up the extra lines you have drawn and the bottom edges and tape the form securely. It is easier if you start at the bottom and tape across every inch or so. Then it will be easier to seal the joint.
  7. Mix your Oogoo and fill your cone form. You don't need to push the Oogoo all the way to the tip.
  8. Push the long end of the dowel through fat side of the Oogoo filled cone and out the other end, all the way until the base of the Oogoo cone touches the CD.
  9. Center the cone on the dowel and check the short end to make sure that the dowel stays centered and perpendicular to the CD. Adjust as necessary.
  10. Inserting the dowel should have pushed some of the Oogoo toward the tip and out the fat side. Press the cone firmly on the CD. Scrape off any excess Oogoo from the CD side. The cone should adhere. Don't worry if it doesn't or if there is a little empty space at the tip.
  11. When the Oogoo has set, remove the cone form. The surface should look shiny.
  12. Set aside to cure.

Step 6: STEP THREE: Make the Lazy Susan

If you already have a Lazy Susan, skip to STEP FOUR.

Draw and cut out two circles from the corrugated cardboard or foam core.  One should be at least 1 to 2 inches wider than the diameter of the large disk/jar cap (see Supplies #10).  Add at least 4 inches to the diameter of the circle you just cut to make the Second circle.  The measurements don’t have to be exact.

Attach to top of the Lazy Susan.

  1. Place the smaller circle flat with the Lazy Susan bearing on top of it. Center the bearing as best you can.
  2. Trace around the edges of the bearing and take the bearing off.
  3. Put pieces of double sided tape within the tracing. Or, spread contact cement within the tracing and on one side of the bearing, let the contact cement get tacky.
  4. Using the tracing as a guide, firmly press down to attach the bearing to the circle.
  5. Tear 4 to 5 inch lengths of duct tape in half. You will need to end up with at least 8 pieces.
  6. With both hands, hold one strip of tap taut and with the sticky side down facing the circle. Slip the tape between the two plates of the bearing at a corner. Keeping the tape taut, tape the corner of the bearing to the circle. Use a pencil tip to secure the tape at the bearing and circle contact. Do this for each corner.  Repeat for the sides of the bearing.
  7. Using larger pieces of tape, further secure and cover the bearing side of the circle.

Attach the base. 

  1. Place the smaller circle, bearing side up on the larger circle.  Center it as best you can.
  2. Trace around the smaller circle.  Move the circle/bearing away.
  3. Put pieces of double sided tape within the tracing. Or, spread contact cement within the tracing and on one side of the bearing, let the contact cement get tacky.
  4. Using the tracing as a guide, firmly press down to attach the bearing to the circle.
  5. Tear long lengths of duct tape in half. You will need to end up with at least 8 pieces.
  6. With both hands, hold one strip of tap taut and with the sticky side down facing the circle. Slip the tape between the two plates of the bearing at a corner. Keeping the tape taut, tape the corner of the bearing to the circle. Use a pencil tip to secure the tape at the bearing and circle contact. Do this for each corner. Repeat for the sides of the bearing,  If you have excess tape, neatly wrap it over to the other side of the circle.  You may have to cut slits in the tape to make sure it lies flat against the surface.
  7. Using larger pieces of tape, further secure the bearing to the Large circle. Use more tape to neatly cover both surfaces of the Base.

Step 7: STEP FOUR: Attach one Part of the Turner

  1. Turn over the Lazy Susan right side up.
  2. Take your large disk/jar lid and center it flat side down on the Lazy Susan. This really needs to be centered to help keep the Lazy Susan stable. Place the disk as close to center as you can. *Gently spin the Lazy Susan and see where the disk is off center. If you hold a pencil steady and touching the edge of the disk while you are spinning the top of the Lazy Susan, you can more easily see what side is sticking out. Tap that side in. Repeat from * until the disk is centered.
  3. Hold the disk down and without moving it from center, trace around its edge.
  4. Spread contact cement or use super strong double stick tape within the tracing and on the flat side of your disk. Let the contact cement get tacky.
  5. Using the tracing as a guide, firmly press down to attach the bearing to the circle. It should be very secure.  

Step 8: STEP FIVE: Finish the Spin Stabilizer

Picture of STEP FIVE:  Finish the Spin Stabilizer
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  1. Cut a circle from foam core with a diameter about 1 inches less than the diameter of a CD.
  2. Cut a hole in the middle of the circle wider than the tunnel entrance.
  3. Tear many narrow strips of duct tape about 2 inches long and set aside so it is readily available for you to use. I tore a piece of duct tape lengthwise down the middle, then tore each of the two pieces in half again.
  4. Center the circle over the angled cut of the first part of the Spin Stabilizer and turn it over to see that the tunnel entrance is not covered.
  5. Lightly secure the circle to the angled side.
  6. Again, check to make sure the circle is centered and the tunnel hole is not covered.
  7. If the hole is covered, adjust the circle and then press the strips of tape into place.
  8. Keep adding additional strips of tape to secure the circle to the first part of the stabilizer.   The strips of tape can be wider. You will probably have to cut slits in the tape at the joint in order to make the tape lie flat.
  9. Cover the entire surface of the Spin Stabilizer with tape, keepin the tunnel hole open.

Step 9: STEP SIX: Connect the Spin Stabilizer to the Lazy Susan

Picture of STEP SIX:  Connect the Spin Stabilizer to the Lazy Susan
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  1.  Place the flat end of the Spin Stabilizer (slanted circle side up) in the center of the first part of the Turner that you attached in Step Four. 
  2. Tear many 2 inch narrow strips of tape.
  3. Lightly secure the Spin Stabilizer to the Turner.  Spin gently to make sure it is centered.  If it isn’t, adjust the strips of tape until it is. Firmly press the strips of tape into place.
  4. Keep adding additional strips of tape to make the Turner/tube joint secure. If your tunnel sticks out of the tube, tape that connection as well. You will probably have to cut slits in the tape at the joint in order to make the tape lie flat. Continue to do this until the piece is very secure and stable. Neatly cover the entire piece, including the top of the Lazy Susan, with duct tape.
  5. Give it a good spin to make sure nothing flies off. Whatever feels loose, reattach in the correct place with duct tape.  You might have to resort to epoxy to really get it secure.

Step 10: STEP SEVEN: First Fitting

Picture of STEP SEVEN:  First Fitting
  1. Get the Winder and put the short side of the dowel into the tunnel hole in the top of the tube arrangement. It should fit snugly, not tightly, in the tunnel. You should be able to turn it without pulling it out of the tunnel but it should also not be able to spin loose.
  2. Spin the Lazy Susan again to make sure everything stays intact. Whatever comes loose, reattach with duct tape. If the winder flies off, bummer.
Just kidding. The tunnel might be too wide. Take the winder off and wrap a layer of duct tape around the short side dowel and try again. Or the short side of the Winder might be too short. Add a piece of dowel or pencil to the short end by holding the ends together end to end and duct taping it together.


Step 11: STEP EIGHT: Make the Other Side of the Turner

Supplies
Find a Jar or Cylinder that fits pretty well (not snugly) in a cylinder that has a larger diameter than the tube diameter of the Spin Stabilizer. I used a CVS jar of muscle rub stuff and my almost empty duct tape roll. The larger diameter is necessary so that rotations of the Turner are fewer than the rotations of the Spin Stabilizer. Gear logic without the gears (Though, I have ordered some gears to eventually modify the design).

Cut out a base.
  1. Draw out a base made from two different sized circles.  One should be at least the size of the Lazy Susan base.  The other should have a diameter about an inch or two inches larger than the jar or inner cylinder of the turner.
  2. Draw lines to connect the outer diameters of the circles.
  3. Cut out the shape.
Using duct tape, secure the Lazy Susan to the larger end of the base.

Determine the placement of the Jar/Cylinder arrangement.

  1. Slip the rubberband over the Spin Stabilizer and over the Jar/Cylinder arrangement.  Pull the Jar/Cylinder away from the Spin Stabilizer keeping it on the main base.  Pull it until the rubberband is taut but not tight.  If it is too tight, it will exert too much pressure on the Spin Stabilizer and make it lose its upright position.
  2. Turn the duct tape roll.  The friction of the rubberband on the outside of the duct tape roll and the cylinder of the Spin Stabilizer should cause the Spin Stabilizer to turn.  If it does not turn and the rubberband appears to be slipping, pull the Jar/Cylinder arrangement further away from the Spin Stabilizer.  Check the turn action again.  Keep adjusting until turning the duct tape roll makes the Spin Stabilizer also turn.
  3. Mark the placement of the Jar/Cylinder arrangement.
  4. Add strips of mounting tape to the top edge of the duct tape roll.  This is to keep the rubberband from slipping off the top of the turn mechanism.
  5. Attach the binder post to the top edge of the duct tape roll.  Add addtional mounting tape.
  6. Test out the effectiveness of the rubberband turn action again.
  7. Adjust if necessary.
  8. Check the height of the rubberband on the duct tape roll to the height of the rubberband on the Spin Stabilizer.  The rubberband should be level.*
  9. Add more mounting tape to both the Spin Stabilizer and to the top and bottom edges of the duct tape roll to prevent the rubberband from slipping out of place while turning.

*I needed to raise the duct tape roll in order to get the rubberband height even with the height on the Spin Stabilizer.  I cut out several additional circles of foam core and cut holes in the center of them to fit over the Jar.  The duct tape roll rested on the top of the foam core and the angle of the rubberband drive was fixed.

Secure the Jar and circles to the main base.
  1. Remove the circles and the duct tape roll.
  2. Using the contact cement, glue the Jar in place on the main base.
  3. Connect all of the circles used to raise the duct tape roll together.
  4. Using the contact cement, glue the circles that are used to raise the duct tape roll.
  5. Duct tape in place.

Make the Turn Handle

  1. Cut a 4 inch length of wire. Pinch it about 1 inch from the end and bend the wire at a 90 degree angle.
  2. Pinch it again just over 1 inch from the first bend and bend it in the opposite direction.
  3. With the remaining length, use the pliers bend it tightly around in a spiral so you can hold it without it poking you.
  4. Place the non-spiral side into the binder post and use it  to more easily make the turn mechanism work.
If you can find a tube with a hollow deeper than that of a binder post, that would be great.  I ended up just using the binder post to turn the turner because the wire turn handle kept slipping out.   I think I am just going to use a stick.

Step 12: STEP NINE: The Yarn Guide

Cut the hook and twisty part off the wire coat hanger and straighten it out as best you can.
Use your pliers to pinch the wire about 3 inches from one end.
Bend the wire 90 degrees, pinch again right next to the bend, and make a 90 degree bend in the opposite direction, pinch again right next to this bend, and make a 90 degree bend in the same direction.
Repeat two more times.
Near the end of the wire, it may become difficult to bend by hand and you may want to use another pair of pliers. You should have a squarish shape that wraps on itself.
You are making a lot of wraps so it is easier to adjust the guide later if you need to.
Hold the wire so the square is a little higher that the highest point of Spin Stabilizer. Bend the wire at that point where it hits the surface you are working on. Leave a 2 inch “tail”.

Tape it down

Step 13: STEP TEN: Winding the Yarn

  1. Place the winder in the Spin Stabilizer
  2. Place the skein to be wound over a yarn swift or have someone hold the yarn for you.
  3. Attach one end of the yarn to the top of the winder.  Hold in place with a CD or cardboard circle with a hole in the center slipped over the top.
  4. Slip the yarn through one of the spirals of the yarn guide.
  5. Pull some yarn loose from the yarn swift.
  6. With your left hand, hold the yarn between the yarn guide and the yard swift and with your right hand hold the turner handle in the binder post and start cranking slowly.
  7. Work a few wraps of yarn around the Winder.
  8. With your right hand, hold the top of the Winder and turn it about 20 degrees in the same direction that the yarn is winding.  You need to turn the Winder every so often in order for the wraps to be evenly distributed around the ball.
  9. Start cranking the turner again and get more wraps on the Winder.  In the beginning, the wraps may not look really nice, but eventually, it will start evening up.  Hold the top of the Winder and turn it about 20 degrees in the same direction that the yarn is winding.
  10. If the yarn swift is not spinning well, pull a good length of yarn off the swift each time you make a turn on of the Winder and before you start cranking.
  11. Keep repeating the cranking to wind the yarn and turning the winder until you have a yard or two left.  Take off the CD or cardboard cap and lift the ball of yarn off the winder.  Loosely wrap the last few yards around the middle of the ball and tuck in the end.

handprints (author) 4 years ago
Video is done!! Click on the link to You Tube.
MicioGatta10 months ago

My Mother's winder broke up a lot of times. My father repaired it every time, but I'll keep in mind this great project in case it will be no more to do. Thank you

dsiddens1 year ago
Beautiful!
ntolbert2 years ago
Video is private so im not sure how i can view it
handprints (author)  ntolbert2 years ago
I think I fixed it. Try it again. thanks!
handprints (author)  ntolbert2 years ago
oops! let me see what I did to it!
I love duct tape! This is great. I will have to try and make one of these. Making hand made items to make hand made..a double cool thing.
handprints (author)  NaturalCrafter4 years ago
thanks so much! I love your knitting "D" too!
Thanks for the compliment. I was looking more closely to how the parts went together. I am getting ready to try and make my own yarn and wanted to be able to wind it up efficiently. You also found references I never found before.
Very cool! How resourceful of you!
sideways4 years ago
YOU ROCK! GO GIRL! I love this :-)
handprints (author)  sideways4 years ago
thanks!!!
handprints (author) 4 years ago
Sorry, had a problem with the link.
lemonie4 years ago

Very good - any possibility of a video?

L
handprints (author)  lemonie4 years ago
still trying to get it uploaded....
handprints (author)  lemonie4 years ago
I forgot my camera had video capabilities!! Will include it today.

Thanks (RealPlayer didn't like it, but I had a go)

L
handprints (author)  lemonie4 years ago
Really? Maybe after Thanksgiving. I have to finishing knitting my daughter's first winter sweater. thanks for the comment!
aemmeleia4 years ago
Great instructions for a very useful thing for knitters/spinners/weavers! Thanks for the link-back to my DIY swift idea, too!
handprints (author)  aemmeleia4 years ago
Thank YOU for designing the swift! I have to double up the yarn I am using to get the correct gauge so I am dealing with 30 skeins that each need to be dealt with and then winding them two balls to into one. I'd rather be knitting! I am making a heavy cardigan cabled hoodie for my daughter.
rimar20004 years ago
Good work, handprints.

I did one of these winders many years ago (1959-1960), copying the design of a commercial. It was a little simpler, but it worked very well.

It had a main axis ending in a small cone at the tip. Revolved around this axis had an arm holding the reel, tilted. The reel had a rubber ring that rested against the little main cone. Manually turning a crank, that rotated the reel support. For every turn that this was, winding the yarn at an angle, slightly rotated its position so that the next turn was adjacent to the first. The result was a winding perfectly cylindrical.

I think I have it still in the attic, would have to scramble a bit to find it.
handprints (author)  rimar20004 years ago
Thanks for the comment!!

please do look for it when you have the time. I love to see how things work! I have my great-uncle's old eggbeater hand drill and am trying to replicate the gear work hobby shop parts...
Forgive, I looked in the attic, garage and backyard shed, without success. I know it exists, or at least was there time ago. Perhaps I have lent it or given away, for years I do not see it. I thinked to take a photo a send it to you...
handprints (author)  rimar20004 years ago
So sad. Things sometimes disappear. Maybe you can sketch it out?
Found on the web these two images that are not very good but they serve to give you an idea. The one I did was not so good finish, but it worked perfectly.
ovillador2.jpgovillador1.jpg
handprints (author)  rimar20004 years ago
Thank you! So the friction from the rubber rings facilitate the turns on both winding the yarn and adjusting the spool. I will work on this some more. Many many thanks!
No. The rubber ring is that lags slightly each turn of yarn over the previous. The loop is produced simply by the rotation of the reel. As the winding axle is skewed, the loop is traversed diagonally.
handprints (author)  rimar20004 years ago
How does the rubber ring make each turn of the yarn slightly lag on the spool? That is what I can't picture in my head.

Thank you for being so patient.
handprints (author)  handprints4 years ago
I see how it works now! Thank you very much!