Make a $2 High-quality Soldering Iron Tip Cleaner

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Introduction: Make a $2 High-quality Soldering Iron Tip Cleaner

This is a really simple 'able. It's my second so I'm not getting into anything too serious yet...If you liked this you might like my wall powered dual-fan solder extractor with a dynamic fan. So let's get started.

Step 1: Materials

All we really need is a 1 1/2" tube, some steel wool, a screw, and something to mount it to - for convenience and also because it would be best not to just leave it on its own, as it would be very unbalanced.

Step 2: Stretch Steel Wool and Mount the Pipe

"Stretch" the steel wool with your hands as much as you can. Now mount the pipe to whatever it is you're mounting it to.

Step 3: Roll Steel Wool and Insert Into Pipe

Roll the wool and push it into the pipe.

You're done. Was that hard?

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    39 Comments

    Most people use a wet cellulose sponge to clean their soldering iron tip regularly. That is what the pan is for on most soldering iron stands, to hold the wet sponge in.

    Picture of soldering iron stand and sponge:
    https://www.instructables.com/files/deriv/FV4/RRAH/F41RXKUZ/FV4RRAHF41RXKUZ.MEDIUM.jpg

    Note also how iron is not held in a vertical position to avoid heating up the handle excessively when the iron is idling.

    If I really need to steel wool a tip I just wipe a piece of steel wool over the tip myself.

    Also, quit being such a baby with puny iron fumes. If you need a fan for an iron what would you need running an 800 pound wave solder pump?

    19 replies

    The idea of this was to: -hold the soldering iron in a convenient matter -have a small place to clean the tip handy and it accompmplished this very well so I don't know why you're complaining. And please restate that last part because I don't have the slightest idea of what you're talking about...

    Again. This is supposed to be simple. I have no idea what a wave soldering machine is, why you brought it up, or why I should care. As much as you'd like to believe they do, the soldering irons don't really care what position they're in, and don't get hot. This was designed with joe newbie in mind. no metal building/bending skills involved. your suggestions are pointless. it's SUPPOSED to be simple!

    Why I brought it up was obviously for illustrative purposes. Why you should care is a riddle for the ages. Just in case you didn't know, soldering is a metal working skill. It is pretty much almost (flux excluded) all about metal, and working with it in point of fact. Your Instructable may possibly be a good learn from others mistakes example. Because who has enough time to make them all on their own? Just because someone is new at something is no reason not to give them the best we can. "Nothing starts out complicated, it just gets that way." --Don Johnson

    I never said anything about soldering not being metalworking. This is a setup for someone new at soldering. Nothing too fancy. And I don't know why you don't think soldering needs a fan, unless you don't solder nearly as much as you lead us to believe.

    Yes but you did place the phrase close enough for me to make the connection. I said it before now I will say it again, just because someone is new is no reason to start them off in the wrong direction. If you don't know why I don't think that hand soldering needs a fan I will try to spell it out as clearly here as I can. Because I have worked in the PCB fabrication industry professionally and have actually run commercial processes that *CAN* lead to flux over exposure and that has given me added perspective that most (that would include you too I am afraid labor laws would disallow you from having these experiences for a few years) do not possess. I've sat at a bench and soldered for full shifts for weeks on end kiddo. Let alone the odd electronics projects I've done over more than 30 years now! I don't need to lead anyone to believe anything, I've the body of work to back up everything I say.

    Again. I'm not starting them off on the wrong foot. There's a difference between a simple system and a bad system. This is a simple system. Please learn the difference.

    You have some learning to do that is for sure!.

    I've said this to other people; just because you have lungs of steel doesn't mean everyone does. Two of my friends' airways get constricted and almost close up if they breathe this stuff. You're cool, we get it; you don't need no stinking fan. Some people do, and that's who the guide was for.

    You simply cannot generate enough fumes off the tip of a soldering iron to get ill from it. Unless you have the tip of the iron up your nose or something. But when you are involved in a process that generates many times the volume of fumes as an iron can then you can become rather sick from the effects.

    I've been in both situations so I know the difference. When I run this thing I need to ventilate, but its a LOT bigger than a soldering iron now isn't it? Honestly I like the smell of flux off an iron, its not bad.


    solderpot.jpg

    " You simply cannot generate enough fumes off the tip of a soldering iron to get ill from it."

    While I am late by 7 years, you really do have no idea what you're talking about. Just because it does nothing to you personally doesn't mean that it doesn't cause horrible nausea from the flux fumes after only a bit of soldering. Talking about myself.

    If you aren't sensitive to it, I agree, soldering a bit in a closed room really won't do a lot of harm to you...

    I do have an idea what I am talking about. Because I have gotten flux sick. But to do it I dumped a whole pound spool of flux core solder into my solder pot. So I am obviously sensitive to flux fumes. It just takes a much larger volume of fumes than will come off a low Watt soldering iron to make me sick.

    *ahem*.

    I wasn't kidding.
    I know 2 different people (not related) whose airway constrict at the inhalation of solder fumes. Now, would you kindly bugger off? Obviously this guide wasn't made for you and I don't know what you're trying to prove, telling people that they should macho up and suck up some acid fumes.

     I am going to jump in this 7 months later. I started using a soldering iron to earn a living in 1975. I have had fans, worked under ventilation hoods, run wave soldering equipment.
    1. You do not ever need a fan to run one soldering iron in a room.
    2. I have found a wet cellulose sponge to be a good tip cleaner if the tip is hot. Keep a small squeeze bottle of H2O handy to keep the sponge moist. If you do not have a soldering stand with a place for a tip cleaner, get a saucer or metal jar lid, a piece of wet sponge, and you are ready to clean the tip as needed.
    3. A professional grade soldering iron of useful wattage should be held in a near horizontal position between soldering operations. It will get too hot to hold comfortably if left nearly vertical. 
    4. Most beginners start off with an iron that does not get hot enough to consistently produce good solder joints.

    john,
    while I'm sure your lungs are quite resilient to the burning flux fumes, I know several people who cannot stand the smell and I'm not going to go and tell them to quit being a sissy because it won't kill them. That said, you have to understand that using a fan never hurts.

    If you won't then I will, quit being a sissy! If you're not writhing on the ground retching your brains out then you don't need a fan to blow away the flux fumes.

    Because when you are really being overcome by flux fumes that is what it is like!

    Why does it bother you when someone wants a fume extractor? Why should he make his lungs have a hard time... If you can buy (or make) one, Why not use it?

    Umm...I don't think you took me serious. For 2 of my friends, the smell of solder fumes constricts their throats to the point that they could suffocate. As in, lose air, and die. Now do you really wanna keep being mr. macho and tell them to man up and suffocate to death; or back off and realize a fan never hurt anyone and no one cares how tough your lungs are?

    Your friends reactions are abnormal. I'm not macho I'm just normal.