Make a Wood Tap From a Bolt





Introduction: Make a Wood Tap From a Bolt

The ability to cut threads in wood can be useful for many projects. Often the needed tap can be expensive and a car ride away. For many applications, a tap can be made from a spare bolt. This simple tap can be made in less than 5 minutes with amazing results.

Step 1: Tools and Materials


  • Angle Grinder
  • Bench Grinder
  • Drill


  • Bolt or screw the size of the desired threads

Step 2: Shape Tap

If using a bolt, cut off the hex head. Create a slight taper on one end of the thread using a bench grinder. You can rotate it by hand or by using a drill to ensure an even taper. This will center your tap when using it.

Step 3: Clamp Tap and Cut Flutes

Clamp your tap on a work bench or in a vice and cut 3 or 4 flutes along the tap. This will give somewhere for the wood chips being cut from your threads to go.

Step 4: Clean Up Threads

Using a nut, run it up and down your tap. This will clean up any burs developed from cutting the flutes.

Chuck the tap in a drill and verify that it runs true. I haven't noticed any damage to my chuck from clamping directly on the threads. If you are concerned about possible damage, grind the threads away with a bench grinder.

Step 5: Tap Hole

Drill a clearance hole just smaller than the minor diameter of the threads. When tapping the hole go slowly and back out after every other revolution or so to clear out the wood chips. These threads will not be as strong as a threaded insert or a t-nut, but they are very useful for some applications.

What other shop tricks do you have up your sleeve? Let me know in the comments.



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    2 Tips

    Instead of clamping the threads in the drill chuck, or grinding the teeth away, go one tiny step further and grind three flats on the gripping area. They don't have to be ultra-precise; IME eyeballing them is good enough. Then the teeth of the chuck will have better surfaces to grab, with less slippage possible even when they are just-tight.

    Threads cut into wood are too weak. To reinforce them, apply cyanoacrilate glue (aka Krazy glue) to the recently cut threads, allow to dry and rethread them lightly and carefully with your tap. Then apply a very little quantity of candle wax. the glue-hardened wood thread will be much more durable and strong! Amclaussen.



    I'd leave the head on the bolt so that I could tap holes using a wrench. Thread a nut all the way onto the bolt FIRST, before doing any grinding. Then when done grinding, thread the nut off to clean up the threads. This trick also works very well whenever you have to shorten a bolt.

    I completely agree when cutting a bolt that you need to put a nut on first. And I thought it would be the same with the tap. However with the slight taper placed on it at the beginning, the threads don't get misaligned as much as cutting the bolt off completely would.

    If you try to use a standard wrench on a tap it won't thread completely straight and it will wobble out the hole. That is unless you use two handles like a traditional tap and die set. I also noticed that the small amount of play between the hex head and the wrench or socket being used can cause the threads to not be perfectly straight.

    I used a tap made from a bolt to thread the end of a rolling pin (instructable will come after Christmas) and it was just slightly out of square. The tap needed to have the hex head on it so it could freely change depth opposed to being firmly held in place with my tailstock like this tap would be. So the hex head definitely is useful is some situations, however the threads may be slightly out of square.

    Simple way to get thread square is to drill a clearance hole in scrap piece of wood. Slide the tap through that, and while holding the scrap firmly against the item being tapped, start the tapping a few turns. Then remove tap and scrap, and continue tapping.

    Pure genius! I'll try this next time. Thanks.

    Great advise. And poetic, too!

    Hi, you said

    "If you try to use a standard wrench on a tap it won't thread completely straight and it will wobble out the hole."

    this all depends on who is doing the tapping I have tapped many holes without a tap wrench and never had one not straight as long as you take the time and keep watching the tap to make sure it is still straight you will not have a problem, having to use a bolt or some threaded rod to cut the thread just needs a little more concentration, also on large diameter holes it would be better to leave on the head of the bolt or to put two nuts on a piece of threaded rod and lock them together makes it much easier to apply the higher torque required to cut the thread.

    You are correct. As long as you can apply a 100% moment with no lateral forces you will be fine. However this can be difficut. Which is why standard tap and die sets have two handles on them. When you apply a couple monent there will be no lateral forces to wobble out the hole. Both are possible, one is just more likely.

    I’ve used the technique where I didn’t have a tap the right size (speciality or metric). Works fine in aluminum too. We tap wood in building radio control planes frequently and it works fine. An additional trick is to tap the wood, apply thin CA glue to soak in the threads, retap after glue sets.

    EXACTLY!, but adding a little candle wax to the Cyanoed thread aids in maintaining the Cyano reinforced thread better! Amclaussen.