Step 2: Ingredients and materials

You will need a small, heat resistant container, such as a stainless steel measuring cup. Use the smallest one you have.

The following quantity will fit easily into most lip balm tins, but you will have a little left over if you are using a tube, which usually holds only 0.15oz. For the triple lipstick mold, double the recipe.

I have tested a variety of different ingredients, and although the end product varies in "feel" you have a lot of flexibility in your choices.

Here is the basic recipe:

1/2 crayon of your favorite color (approx 2.4g)
1/2 tsp jojoba oil (approx 2 g)
1 almond-sized chunk of shea butter (approx 2g)

Ingredients you can add to the above:

1 pea-sized dab of lanolin (improves feel and possibly color distribution)
1 pinch gum arabic (improves color distribution and durability of color)
1 drop vitamin E (helps prevent oil from becoming rancid, improves shelf life)
1 pinch zinc oxide (makes color lighter and more opaque, offers protection against UVA and UVB sun rays -- but make sure your wax mixture is well stirred before you pour)

Alternate ingredients:

You can replace shea butter with cocoa butter (will make lipstick slightly more firm)
You can replace jojoba oil with castor oil (will make a glossier lipstick)

These are the alternate ingredients I've tried, but there's no reason you can't experiment with any other type of edible oils.

Oh btw I have sensitive skin so will coconut oil make my lips blow up?
Not unless you're allergic to coconut oil... to test it, put a little oil in the on your skin (the wrist or crock of your elbow is a good place). If it becomes itchy, don't use coconut oil)
Oh btw I have sensitive skin so will coconut oil make my lips blow up?
Oh this is a fun instructable thank you<br>Pleez keep posting :)
<p>I think this is so cool and will defenitly try it </p>
I used old clear Chapstick instead of Vaseline or coconut oil and put the lipstick in a Chapstick container
<p>I am beginning to consider giving this a try, though I am still a little skeptical. For one thing, it is possible to make a claim that your product is non toxic even if it contains questionable ingredients. And even if Crayola is confident that their product is safe, how closely are they supervising production? There have been many incidents of reputable companies, such as Fisher Price and Matel, having lead based paint and other toxic stuff found in their toys, which, according to them, they knew nothing about. </p><p>But then again, it wouldn't be the wierdest thing I ever used as makeup, and I'm sure some of my choices were not exactly safe. Not to mention some of the commercial cosmetics I used in the past, which are downright scary when you actually look at what's in them. </p>
<p>I found another way. What you do is get Vaseline, get your favorite colored pencil, shave off the color with scissors into a container, mix some Vaseline with it and you got some lipstick.</p>
<p>Did it really work? I can't imagine the pigment from shaved pencils would mix properly with vaseline. Maybe it you grind it really fine, but even then I imagine it would just disperse, not actually dissolve. Also, I know that crayons have wax and pigments, but I'm not sure what's in the colored leads of pencils -- and I wouldn't want to put anything on my lips unless I felt reasonably sure it's safe.</p>
<p>If you want safe then do NOT use any type of vaseline. It is a by-product of petroleum and is HIGHLY, HIGHLYY toxic to the body, especially when people use it on babies. If anyone tells you otherwise then just research it and you'll see. A safer, all natural route is a spoonful of coconut oil per crayon. it works perfectly and makes the lipstick not only moisturizing but makes it go on very smoothly.</p>
<p>If you are using crayons to make your lipstick then there is no point in avoiding Vaseline, since crayons are mostly paraffin wax, which is also a petroleum product. Most commercially prepared lipsticks and balms also contain petroleum products, as well as other moisturizers and beauty products. So do many of the foods you eat, not to mention just about everything that is made of plastic, including food and beverage containers.... If you want to avoid petroleum, you pretty much have to move to another planet. Or go back in time to before we started using petroleum.</p>
Actual Vaseline is harmless is actually very useful And not just for beauty reasons. And as said by a dermatologist (who doesn't work for Vaseline): &quot;Vaseline is highly-refined, triple-purified and regarded as non-carcinogenic.&quot;
Hear hear! People can develop allergies to almost any so-called &quot;natural&quot; products (never been able to figure out what that really means), but Vaseline is reliably neutral and safe.
Can I use blistex?
No u can't use fucking chapstick... Like are u fucking nuts ?? lipstick ? IS LIFE!!!!!!!
I tried to make a blue lipstick, but it ended up more like a tinted lip gloss; I also tried to make a black lipstick, but even though I used the same ratio, it was too solid. Any tips, primarily for the blue?
Try doubling the crayon and oil and omitting the Shea butter... If it ends up too soft, add more crayon, too hard add more oil. Maybe (for blue, not black) adding a pinch of zinc oxide will make it lighter and less transparent.
Love this! One thing that worked for me was using cocoa butter and coconut oil, it gave it a very smooth texture, better than most commercial lipsticks in my opinion, and definitely cheaper! I made a neutral tone and a red, and i couldnt be happier with the results!
cool!i dont wear lipstick but my mom wud like one
Get off this fucking site... Your dead to me ?????? lipstick is... Is.... LIFE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I considered making some of this for when I&nbsp;occasionally get gothed up.<br /> <br /> Just a note about the Lanolin optional ingredient. It's rare, but some people have an allergy to it. If you've never used any products with lanolin before (more likely if you're a guy like me)&nbsp;test a tiny bit of lanolin (or a product with it in - a lot of barrier creams use it) on your skin.<br /> <br /> My hairdresser found out about my lanolin allergy the hard way (for me) when after testing my skin for reaction to the black hair dye (no problem there) she began to apply barrier cream to my neck causing me to yell (it burned like crazy). After she'd apologised and quickly wiped it away and washed the spot where she'd put it I&nbsp;had a red 'fingerprint' on the back of my neck. Took about an hour to go down IIRC.<br /> <br /> Like I said. If you want to include Lanolin be aware that there's a slight possibility that you (or whoever you give it to)&nbsp;may have an allergy to it like I did. (assuming it WAS the Lanolin but they couldn't find anything else in the cream that I&nbsp;was likely to react to).
<p>I took up doing this because I am allergic to stevia and it's in all the cool natural lip balms. You can be allergic to anything unfortunately.</p>
True -- but luckily this is super easy to make and customize so it's no trouble to avoid all the ingredients which you are sensitive or allergic to.
Thanks for pointing that out. The relationship between lanolin and allergies is particularly fraught... in wikipedia, they write that lanolin is both hypoallergenic AND that some people are allergic. Possibly because the term hypoallergenic has no legal meaning whatsoever, it was invented by one of Don Draper's (Mad Men) real-life colleagues in the 1950s. But I digress. &nbsp;There are several grades of lanolin, the most refined (and allergy-free) is used to coat bandaids to prevent sticking, or to slather on the nipples of breastfeeding mothers, to avoid painful, cracked and bloody breasts... so that type of lanolin is quite safe given that it protects open wounds and is approved for tiny infants, who can't even consume honey, eggs or wheat. Which is not to say that some people might be allergic! Here's an <a href="http://orgs.dermis.net/content/e05eecdrg/e05news/e686/e720/index_ger.html" rel="nofollow">article</a> on the difficulty of ascertaining lanolin allergy, for those who are interested.
thank u! im lazy so i put it in the microwave for&nbsp; 22 sec:) ill never buy lipstick again.
<p>hey, um can I use this wit hair coconut oil? </p>
I'm not familiar with hair coconut oil, but my first instinct would be to say no. Check the ingredients: if it's 100% coconut oil with no other additives, it's probably OK. If there are other ingredients you need to check them one by one and make sure they are all edible, but I doubt they would be, since this is a hair product. I wouldn't risk it. You can buy coconut oil (for cooking) in most grocery stores which will be safe and delicious.
Could i make this without oils?
Yes instead of oil use Vaseline
<p>You can substitute one type of oil or butter with another, but you can't omit it -- if you did all you would have left is a crayon! And that won't spread on your lips. By the way, butters are oils too -- they're just solid at room temperature. </p>
<p>can i use crazy art</p>
<p>can i use crazy art</p>
<p>can i use oil pastels?</p>
<p>I wouldn't.</p>
<p>what do you need to make it</p>
<p>Ingredients are listed in step 2</p>
<p>what do you need to make it</p>
<p>So I was wanting to try the crayon lipstick using kokum butter, beeswax pastilles, coconut oil, and crayola crayons. Would these ingredients work just as well?</p>
I've never tried kokum butter, but I imagine it would be a fine replacement for the shea butter. Skip the beeswax pastilles though, because there's already wax in the crayons so if you add more the result will be too waxy and won't spread nicely. Coconut oil will work too.
Could I use veggie oil? I don't have any coconut oil and the store here does not sell it
Of course -- as long as it's food grade you can use any oil. The oil used will influence the &quot;feel&quot; of the lipstick but you can substitute any oil with another edible one.
<p>does it matter what brand of oil you use</p>
No, as long as it's food grade.
What kind of coconut oil do you use is it the one that you use for your hair
<p>Can i sell crayola crayons or do i have to get permission from crayola</p>
<p>Not sure if I understand your question... If you want to sell crayons, presumably you'd be buying them wholesale from Crayola and then selling them. The act of buying them wholesale implies that you have permission to resell the crayons... If you want to make lipstick with crayons and then sell that lipstick while advertising that they contain crayola crayons, then yes, I would contact Crayola to get their permission. You'd be using their name and brand to advertise your product. But I would guess they would NOT grant you permission for various brand protection and liability reasons. It's one thing to make your own DYI products for yourself, quite another to sell it.</p>
<p>I just heard about this from My friend...she uses coconut oil and other essencial oils which aren't needed to make it but she likes them...also says if you add a drop of cinnimon oil...it plumps the lips if you need plumping ...she has amazing lips..that are plump enough without it...seen in the pic.</p>
<p>Yes, you can absolutely use different carrier oils -- personally I'd be cautious with essential oils, they can be very potent and since they're on your lips, they will make it into your body... Not all of them are safe to ingest. Depending on the EO in question and the quantity that may be a problem. It is possible that cinnamon oil makes your lips swell, but to me that would be a proof that too much is being used! A tiny bit for the flavor might be pleasant, but if your lips get noticeably swollen (or &quot;plump&quot;) then it's an allergic reaction, and not a very good thing!</p>
<p>Sorry it is good that you have the words but it will be better if you put it with the pictures to see what you are making&lt;3</p>

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