Pizza is a staple at our house, and we love making sprouted dough for it's whole-grain goodness and to switch up on our usual wheat flour pizza.

Sprouted breads have long history, may offer very slight advantage in protein, nutrient availability, and let you mix your favorite grains and legumes (my example dough contains wheat, spelt, rice and beans!); to me it's mostly about the wonderful texture and earthy taste! Sourdough starter complements a sprouted dough well.

What you need

* Assorted dry whole grains and legumes (try the bulk section at your grocery store)
* Mason jar
* A strainer lid for your jar (find these at any health food store or online at ebay, amazon)
* Food processor (or, if you dare, mortar and pestle)
* Oven
* Several days to let your grains sprout
* all the usual things you need for pizza dough --- yeast, flour, salt, water
* tomato, cheese (or fake cheese) and toppings

When I make pizza dough I like to limit my sprouted sponge to 30-60% of dough, using whole grain flour as the remainder to maintain excellent dough integrity. It's possible to make a 100% "flourless" dough but the texture is wetter and chewier than what you'd expect from pizza. In this case it can be helpful to add a binding agent like flax, egg, or oil.

If you're looking for a crispier texture (and you don't have issues with gluten) try a pizzaria trick --- add a pinch of vital wheat gluten.

If you've never made bread or pizza dough before I strongly suggest trying more traditional recipes first so you can find a process you like, get a good idea of baking proportions, see what good (and not so good) dough development looks like!

Step 1: Soak your grains overnight and let them sprout

Take you grains and legumes, place them in your mason jar, attaching a strainer lid. Cover with water and let sit overnight.

When morning comes, you should notice they've expanded and taken on water! Invert your jar and empty the water.

You'll store them this way, inverted (it can be helpful to rest your jar on a wire rack or kitchen towel).

Now it's time to wait!

Rinse your grains and drain at least once a day.  And be on the look out for mold or anything strange.
<p>This inspires me to try and make some sprouted grain bread. Thanks for sharing.</p><p>sunshiine</p>
<p>Sprouted grains are the new wave in healthy eating. Thanks for this pizza dough recipe!</p>
<p>Nice idea!</p><p>I would like to add that when you pre-bake the pizza, you could add some oil at the bottom in order to make the surface more crunchy. (even more! :) )</p>

About This Instructable


24 favorites


Bio: Sharing knowledge and ideas. Constantly learning!
More by danasf: Intel Edison and Addressable LEDs Internet of Ducks Lighting In A Bottle
Add instructable to: