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I had just made a sissy bar for my cruiser bike, but was unhappy as how the pop rivets looked, they where very visable and did nothing to take away the home made look.

I solved this problem by using cup washers on either side of the joint to be riveted, they make the joints look much more professional.

Its not much of a how to but more of this works and can be used in lots of applications.

Thanks for looking, I hope you find this method useful.

Step 1: How To.

All you need for this trick are cup washers that have the same size hole as your pop rivet.

1. Use a cup washer on either side of the joint and rivet as usual.

2. Use the stem of a rivet to knock out the steel stub that is left in the riveted joint, these rust eventually and will stain the work piece.

3. Use a small hammer to flatted the crimped end of the rivet into the well of the cup washer.

That's it, the is not much to it but it gives a much more pleasing finish .

Thanks for looking, I hope you find the idea useful.


Step 2: Other Aplications.


I actually discovered this idea when messing around with some aluminium curtain rail left over from the sissy bar project.

I have been toying with the idea of making a small sterling engine to run from the heat of my wood stove and had though of using the aluminium rail to make the brackets and connecting rods with.

The same method could also be used to make eyelets on brackets for bike break systems and the hole is big enough for a break cable to pass through.

If anyone has other idea please share them.

To be honest I dont think pop rivets look to Un-professional in the first place.
They do when you can see both sides of the rivet.
Here in Argentina these washers are named cot or cradle washers (arandelas cuna). <br><br>I think that when a pop rivet is not properly terminated is because it is longer than necessary. For example, in the second photo of the introduction, when you put &quot;Not happy with how the rivets look&quot;. If you draw these rivets and replace them with others 2 mm shorter, they must stand well (pardon my English). I don't know how to calculate the proper length, i do it by eye, depending on the diameter of the rivet and the softness of the substract. In example: over metal it will be shorter than over rubber. I also use washers when the substract is not enough strong, case of plastic, leather, leash, wood, etc.
That picture was from the Ible i did on making the cissy bar.<br> <br> Any pop rivet that are exposed are ugly, the cup washers was the solution that I came up with they worked out so well I did this Ible to share the idea.
They 're really called finishing washers.<br><br>Great idea!
Well, where I come from they are called cup washers. The hardware store I worked in stocked them under cup washers and our suppliers also used the term cup washer.
Well done!
Thanks.
Great idea!
Thanks, They really do make the rivets look so nice on viable joints.<br> <br> I have been a huge fan of the cup washer for many years, they can make the simplest things look much nicer and can have so many other uses if you are thinking outside the box.<br> <br> I bought a full box of the cup washers reap cheap for the VAWT project.the full box was about &pound;4 for and it contained 1000 of them.

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Bio: Learning to live with Fibromyalgia brought on be numerous injuries some old some quite recent. Currently under no fixed agenda, just going with the flow ... More »
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