loading

Step 3: Making the Koeksisters

METHOD:

Roll the dough out until about 5mm (0.2 inches) thick. Make sure in is at least 7 to 9cm (2.75 to 3.5 inches) long. Cut the dough into 5cm (1.96 inches) broad strips. Divide each strip (block of 8 x 5cm) into three equal strips called fingers. Do not divide them right through but leave them attached at one end. This should leave you with 8 x 5cm blocks of dough each with three "fingers" but all still connected at one end.

We are now going to braid / weave / plait the dough like you would hair into a pigtail. Once you has braided the dough press the ends tightly together.

Heat up the oil and once the oil is ready put the raw "koeksisters" in two or three at a time. Let them fry for 2 to 3 minutes until golden brown then turn them over for another minute or two on the other side. Make sure they are all round golden brown.

The oil must not be too hot. The hotter the oil, the "crispier" the outside of the "koeksister" will be. This will also happen if you leave them in too long. They should normally just turn a golden yellow, light brown before you take them out of the oil.
Unfair, how can I look at them at not want to make them. Koeksisters are so nice. When ever I go to a friends house and there are koeksisters... Empty bowl remains. I'm totaly going to jot down your recipe. Thanks.
These things are amazing!!! I've had them before and would recommend them to anyone! <br> <br>Thanks Andre for making an instructable about them, I hope to make these for sure!
You should try them. You will be the talk of the town. They are actually a weird looking doughnut. The braiding bit is n bit tricky but by the end of the batch you will be a champion. <br> <br>The syrup is a killer. People do different things with the syrup to give them different flavors. Some have a strong ginger taste, others are more cinnamon. Some people keep the syrup warm and let the &quot;koeksisters&quot; soak in them overnight. They then become soft, juicy and quite sweet. <br> <br>Mine were n bit crispy, not too sweet and a little like a doughnut right in the middle.
Wow, those sound so good. I love ginger and cinnamon. :D
The syrup is actually what makes the &quot;koeksister&quot;. I submerged the cinnamon stick a lot during the boiling of the syrup. The &quot;koeksister&quot; is a kind of doughnut and during this instructable, my wife and I, made a few &quot;doughnuts&quot; and covered then in &quot;koeksister&quot; syrup. They were just as delicious! The &quot;koeksister&quot; has become such a part of the South African Afrikaans culture that we call everyday occurrences by this name. A specific set of very busy highways and flyovers that intertwine each other is called &quot;koeksister&quot; crossing. A very conservative girl that does not put out will be called a &quot;koeksister&quot;, anything intertwined or crossed over might be called a &quot;koeksister&quot;. <br> <br>You should really try then. It is a bit of work and the end result will not last long. Although the &quot;koeksister&quot; can last for days, ours did not even see 24 hours before they were all gobbled up.
Since this uses water, you should think about entering this in the Water Challenge. :)<br> <a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Summer-Water-Challenge/" rel="nofollow">http://www.instructables.com/id/Summer-Water-Challenge/</a>
Since this uses water, you should think about entering this in the Water Challenge. :)<br> <a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Summer-Water-Challenge/" rel="nofollow">http://www.instructables.com/id/Summer-Water-Challenge/</a>

About This Instructable

44,584views

25favorites

License:

Bio: I love finding out how things work. I like reading. I love the Internet for its vast amount of information. I like helping others and ... More »
More by Andre Coetzee:Laptop Hacks and Repairs Solve Laptop Overheating Animating Pictures 
Add instructable to: