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Part 1: I introduce some basic ideas and fold the first large model.


Part 2: I go down to the smaller scales with a model of a Fox. The fox model is from Origami Omnibus by Kunihiko Kasahara, which has the full instructions.


Part 3: I go back to make a larger model using thicker paper to simulate the effects that will happen with the smaller scales.


Part 4: I scale down the crane model to small scales.


Part 5: I go to smaller scales with a dinosaur model (a loch ness monster type dinosaur).


Part 6: I make an even smaller crane model and conclude the series.
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Back towards the end of May I posted a picture of a very tiny set of origami that I made using bond paper and my fingers and the question was asked, “How do you make them?”

Apparently claiming magic is not acceptable to the Instructables community.

I believe the following video will help to answer your questions.

I look forward to any comments! This is my first video post, so let me know wat you think about the editing, pacing, etc...

If you make some tiny origami of your own please post them!

Edit: I made some changes to the video to improve the quality, but after those edits I really felt that this should be broken up a bit better as a step by step Instructable, which is posted now. Thanks for the feedback everyone!
<p>these are awsome instructions and i think you took time on them</p>
Thank you very much! It's a lot of work but nice comments like yours make it worth the effort.
Awesome, thanks for posting and showing your technique. I liked the video a lot because you told the cold hard realities about micro origami such as the sweat from your fingers helping and the fact that they won't be perfect because of the small scale. <br>Earlier when you said that you only used normal printer paper I was really surprised. Since origami paper is thinner I would used that if I attempted to fold this small but I was also thinking about foil paper because it holds it folds much better. Have you tried either of those and what was your experience if so?
Thanks! <br> <br>Mostly I do origami as a way to keep my hands busy when I'm doing other things. When I'm at the hobby store I tend to forget to pick up specialty paper, so for the most part my experience has been with bond (printer) paper, post-it notes, and the paper rings at restaraunts. <br> <br>I'm sure I have some origami paper around, so I should try it. <br> <br>I am not sure about foil paper. Holding a crease is good, but if it holds a crease too well at those scales you might not be able to reverse a fold.
That IS the drawback of the foil paper. It's an especially annoying problem when the model involved tucking flaps into places such as on a water bomb. Now if some sort of tools were used to help open those areas up I bet the end result would be great.
<p>how about using pin and sticking a pin in between the fold and slide it along then upwards? </p>
<p>That can be helpful. I generally don't use tools out of habit since I was making these small to keep from being seen folding, but a pin or toothpick might help.</p>
<p>I made a crane 1cm long, 8mm wide and 5mm high. thanks for the video.</p>
<p>Good to hear. I saw your picture on the other Instructable. Keep folding!</p>
Thanks<br>
<p>Glad I could help!</p>

About This Instructable

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Bio: I'm a Mechancial/Aerospace Engineer that likes to tinker in my spare time. I make my own Christmas Cards.
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