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Dvd player as a computer monitor? You remember that we used a composite monitor back in the Mythtv instructables. (https://www.instructables.com/id/Setting-up-a-computer-based-DVR-with-Mythtv-for-l/). Here we are going to do a variation on that but use a dvd player as the monitor. Though I meant this to be for text based server and computers Certain low gui desktops could work also.

Most but not all computer servers are going to the command line I.e no graphics. Even as I understand it, MSWindows 8 server is going to the command line. Never hurts to have a back up monitor for an emergency, for portability, or if you just want to go retro.

Also see: https://www.instructables.com/id/Extra-TV-setup/

Note: Tried two old portable B&W tv's and it did not work.

Update: Using the dvd player as a monitor for Raspbmc!

Step 1: Computer Video Output.

S-video was a step up from the old composite video from earlier computers. Actually it is still around if you look at your video card or the back of your computer you may see an s-video port. Even some of the newest cards still support s-video.

Step 2: Adapter Cables and Adapters.

Harder and harder to find, but you still can get the cables and or adapters. S-video cables usually come in three varieties, They either are composite and audio or chroma, luma and audio.  Some adapters only have composite video. That is what I used for the pictures here. Found it at the 99cent store of all places.

Note: The Comodore 1701 and related monitors supported the chroma and luma inputs.  No connection to Cyber Technology.

Step 3: Make Your Own Adapter.

(Try this at your own risk!) If you care technically inclined you can hack an s-video extension or male jack. Just get a 470 pF capacitor.  Should be under a dollar.at your local electronics store.

Note: Have not tried this myself yet.

Step 4: Technology Can Surprise You.

Your results may vary, but it worked for me.screen hooked to ald PC to see what would happen.

Step 5: The Computer.

A picture of the computer (running a Debian lamp) web server used for the instructable. When the raspberry pi comes out, it will be used instead.

Note: You do not need that many cables. We were just testing quite a lot of things to see what worked.

Step 6: Graphics.

Running gui via Reactos. Screen looked better than the picture I took.

Step 7: B&W Tv.

We did find that even though the desktop computer did not really work with the old portable tv's, the RaspberryPi worked just fine. Even though the screen was limited, it was much easier to read on an old portable B&W tv. The old tv also works with the arduino via TV.out.

Step 8: Test Hack.

Was throwning together some old pentium I's from the junk parts and wondered if the monochrome tv would work. This will take you back. Found and old "EGA" graphics card with composite out. How would it work with linux?  After a bit of tweaking. it seems to work. Now you will not get a gui screen from a server, but that is just fine!  Usually do not use a monitorr on the server anyway. There is more than one way to skin a cat.

Note: Have a "CGA" card somewhere but did not take the time to look for it.

Step 9: The TV the Media Said Was Worthless.

With the help of the vcr as an rf modulator, we hooked up the computer to it to see the results. No Gui, but textmode and text games work fine. Forgotten how long the Tv has been in the family. At least three decades or more. Still love ninvaders!

Step 10: Advanced.

You can even use an extra pc or your touchpad to act as a monitor. You just need to have what is know as an rdp client. Most of the touchpads have them now.  First shots were done with a Nexus 7 acting as a monitor.

To access the linux boxes and raspberry pi, you will need to install a vnc server or use xrdp:

$ sudo apt-get install xrdp.

Note the gui does not need to be running on the raspberry pi. Better if it is not.

Step 11: Arduino

Even the Arduino can be hooked to a composite monitor with siftware that supports the TV.out libary/

Step 13: Regular Lcds.

Miniature lcs have their place too especially for reporting.

Step 14: Text Only Terminals Can Be Good Too.

Text terminals have their uses too, especially with embedded systems, networking equipment, and for debugging servers.

Step 15: Trs-80 B&w Monitor Hack.

Try this at your own risk.

Almost had forgotten about this At one time I had a Commodore computer or two and needed another monitor, but did not want to spend several hundred dollars for another monitor. This was probably one of my first hardware hacks. The Trs-80 model one monitor was basically a composite monitor but required a +5 v dc line.

Model 1 video connector

The TRS-80 Model 1 monitor was actually a black and white RCA television set with most of the guts taken out. Because the chassis was connected to the power mains, Radio Shack added an optical isolator to help prevent shocks. The output of the TRS-80 was 5 volts to power the optoisolator, and a standard 2 volt composite video signal. If you want to have a bigger monitor, you can wire up a DIN connector with pins 4 and 5 and connect that to the video input of your TV (or VCR or whatever).

If I were you, I would rip out the DVD readers and place the raspi, then put in a voltage regulater to power the pi off of the player's battery. Bonus points for a miniature keyboard intagrated somewhere
Sounds like an interesting idea. Do not have a spare dvd player. I will probably just get a case and use double stick tape to attach the RPi to the back of the player, We dislike one function devices. Multi-use is more practical...
I've had a similar idea.. Just scavenged a Sylvania 10" DVD player from the junk yard.. Found out the reason the person tossed it, apparently someone in quality control missed where the ribbon cable for the LCD/Speakers went in the base, and crimped several wires of the ribbon, between a screw mount. (they layered 7-8 wire sections of the ribbon op top of eachother, and tightened the screw for the base to the middle/keyboard, right on it.. Video looked Horrible!) Now.. Looking at a detached LCD/Speaker panel, with a ZIF strip, and no source for the connector pin-out. Small as it is, it's about the right dimensions for a HD, but I'd be darned if I could figure a way for connecting it to the HDMI port of the RPi.
If you go to fcc.goc with the fcc id, you might be able to score some documents.
I've had a similar idea.. Just scavenged a Sylvania 10" DVD player from the junk yard.. Found out the reason the person tossed it, apparently someone in quality control missed where the ribbon cable for the LCD/Speakers went in the base, and crimped several wires of the ribbon, between a screw mount. (they layered 7-8 wire sections of the ribbon op top of eachother, and tightened the screw for the base to the middle/keyboard, right on it.. Video looked Horrible!) Now.. Looking at a detached LCD/Speaker panel, with a ZIF strip, and no source for the connector pin-out. Small as it is, it's about the right dimensions for a HD, but I'd be darned if I could figure a way for connecting it to the HDMI port of the RPi.

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