Instructables

Metrication of Recipes Simplified

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America is still using Imperial Measurements in their recipes. There are 6.4 billion Metric users vs. only .3 billion Americans. So this is a four step, when you use your Metric Cups/Spoons, process to convert your American recipes to Metric.

 When I first made my first Metric instructable there was virtually no one selling Metric Cups and Spoons. As of 8/7/2010 I have found now only three websites selling to Americans, True Metric Cups and Spoons, and you should spend no more then $5. Replacing your American cups, 237 mL for a Metric cup, 250 mL, and Replace your American tablespoon set, 14.79 mL with true Metric tablespoon set, 15 mL.

Next you need to do, is substitute every American pound (453.59 g) with 500 g. That was easy, no? You will need to convert centimeters, and Celsius. In the end you will actually end up making about 10% more. Why? Because the Metric Kitchen units are bigger then the American units.

Metric is easy -- one gram of water = one milliliter of water = one cubic centimeter.

Water --- 1 g = 1 mL = 1 cm³ 
                 1 kg =  1 L = 1 dm³
                 1 Mg = 1 kL = 1 m³

Find Metric Cups
Find Metric Spoons
 
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Step 1: Choose Your Faviorite Recipe

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So You Want to Convert Your Recipe to Metric And You Want to Use Weights With Your Dry Ingredients? How Do You Do It?

Are You Confused and Baffled?
Don't Worry

 It is a Four Step Process, if you use Metric cups/spoons, That You Have To Follow

First, you do not have to change the cups and spoon measurements keep them exactly the way they are. But add the words 'This is a Metric Recipe with one cup = 250 mL'

Remember the following ...
One cup = 250 mL
Half cup = 125 mL
Quarter cup = 60 mL (62.5)
Eigth cup = 30 mL (31.25)
One tablespoon = 15 mL
One teaspoon = 5 mL








Prfesser3 years ago
Your method is probably quite useful for cooking. Caution should be taken when *baking*, i.e., cakes, breads, piecrust, etc. Cooking can be, and often is, done 'slapdash' without careful measurement. Baking usually requires more precision.

Your point is well made about Americans and the metric system. Sigh... I doubt that it will change in the foreseeable future.
spamattakky (author)  Prfesser3 years ago
No you should not have any troubles, really, because you switch to Metric cups, 250 mL, first then use the volume to weight calculators like ...
http://www.onlineconversion.com/weight_volume_cooking.htm
They get their data from US Nutrition database.
Culturespy3 years ago
I use both on a regular basis and have no problem with either one. Both are taught in US schools and most labels have both measures on them. It's not all that difficult the way it is.
spamattakky (author)  Culturespy3 years ago
You are right, but if you have seen how the food website try to do conversions, you would understand. Some do not even use the right abbreviations or do exact conversions. And you end up with odd ball Metric numbers, so I use this as an example when I contact the food websites to show them that they are doing it wrong or overdoing it.