Instructables
Picture of Microwave Heating Pad
I love these microwaveable heating pads.  The are great for soothing sore muscles, injuries and cramps, or just for warming up your bed before you go to sleep.  They are really easy and inexpensive to make and make great gifts!
 
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Step 1: Picking fabric

Picture of Picking fabric
I use polar fleece for one side and cotton on the other side.  The fleece is thicker so that side of the heating pad is not as warm to the touch as the cotton side, which is nice, especially when it just comes out of the microwave and the cotton side might be a bit too hot for a few minutes.  Make sure the fabrics don't have any printed designs on them that have glitter or metallic paint.  I usually buy fabric in the remnants bin for these because you don't need really big pieces.
For this one, I used some pretty blue cotton and tan fleece.  Make sure you wash the fabric first!

Step 2: Cut out your fabric

Picture of Cut out your fabric
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One of the great things about these things is that you can make them in any size and shape you want.  I made this one rectangular shaped but you can also make long, thin ones to wrap around your neck.
Cut out one rectangle each of cotton and fleece.

Step 3: Sew two sides together

After cutting out a rectangle of cotton and a rectangle of fleece, pin them with right sides together and sew around the edges leaving about 1/4" inch seam allowance.  Make sure you leave an opening of a few inches so you can add the rice afterwards.  Then sew another seam about 1/8" inside the first seam.  Make sure you don't sew the opening though!

Step 4: Add rice

Picture of Add rice
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Turn your newly sewn bag right side out using the hole you left in the seam.  My friend gave me some cheap rice she had left over that she wasn't going to use to fill this bag.  I've found it is easiest to just put the open side of the bag of rice inside the opening int he fabric and pour the rice in.
xoAbiox1 year ago
I would love to make one of these!! Does anyone have any suggestions on adding scents? Like essential oils? I don't want to make my microwave smell!
lillicalux1 year ago
This is a great Instructable, except for one thing: I do not recommend using the fleece. Because it gets hot, you run the risk of it getting hot enough to melt the synthetic fibers. I use 100% cotton flannel for all of mine.
That's definitely good to keep in mind. I wouldn't have thought to use fleece, but I've seen many store-bought microwave heating pads made from the same material and I've never have a problem with mine melting, just don't heat it for longer than 3 minutes!
saosport1 year ago
Great instructable. I have been making these for years out of old wash cloths or socks (clean socks that lost there partner) I love the idea of polar fleece. I never thought of using that. I will have to make one for grandma. Also flax seed works nice instead of rice. It does not smell after long use.
I love using flax seeds but I think they cost more than rice, and I happened to have rice on hand. There have been some great suggestions of different ways to make these things in the comments!
bobcash1 year ago
I love this idea! I need a specific size for placing on my (closed) eyes. Warm heat is the cure all for a sty on your eye! I would imagine one could throw it in the freezer for a cold compress also.
Wow !! Thats really friendly and easy !! Thanks for the amazing share :)

Heating Pad | Sabar Healthcare | Sabar India
Yeah i agree with my friend using field corns, thats the way even i have prepared before !! It smells great..haha. and works great too..Fabrics do really enhance your Heating pad a lot !!
Thanks for sharing the above insights :) 
I am sure it works great, I never thought of using rice. When I make mine I use field corn that you get at the feed store. Mine will smell like popcorn when it's heated up.
grannyjones2 years ago
I used to do this with orphan socks.
sunshiine2 years ago
I loved the fabric you chose for this bag!
Thanks!